Reader reviews for Warped Passages

This is not an easy book to read. What's easy about quantum mechanics? To my own astonishment, however, Lisa Randall took me from basic physics to the esoteric theories of warp geometry, string theory and added dimensions in a way that I could understand and actually remember. She uses examples from our daily lives in an imaginative and fun way to make the readers understand some extraordinarily difficult concepts and take us along the road of discovery and, of course, speculation.This book has nothing to do with Star Trek or Star Wars but I found it just as fascinating.
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Good overview of some recent developments in string theory, but some muddled explanations made this a slog. I skipped to the end of the chapters and read the bullet points too often.
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I couldn't finish the book, so I took her suggestion and finished up the last hundred pages or so by reading the main bullet points at the end of every chapter. I found this book to be long-winded at times, but nothing against her, as I'm sure that she's a brilliant physicist. I just found her writing style to be too light and all over the place (granted, it is a difficult topic to write about to the lay person). She seemed awfully upbeat about the promise of string theory, barely acknowledging the fact that it's nearly impossible (if not so) to test any of these theories out. Physics at this level is nothing but advanced mathematics, yet she barely admits this fact. Had this book proposed to talk about the mathematics rather than the "physics" of string theory, I would have been able to digest this book easier. Physics at this level is nothing but mental masturbation.I have done a fair amount of reading on this material, and while it is good at explaining the extra dimensions, I would point readers to other books if they want a good introduction and history to the science leading up to string theory (Brian Greene and Michu Kaku come to mind). Sorry, but I just couldn't get into this book, and I really wanted too...
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Fascinating, but really hard to get through for a non-science person. She does her level best though.
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The absolute best description of a multi-dimensional universe I've ever read for someone without the necessary background to understand anything more than a rare, rough, abstraction of the mathematics involved. Which, sadly, is me. But less sad for the existence of this book.
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Lisa Randall does an excellent job of making complex ideas understandable to nonspecialists. She explains new ideas about the dimensionality of spacetime and along the way the reader gets to discover the underlying component parts of the universe. To one interested in God, theology and religion, this book is especially fascinating. Creation is truly extraordinary (and that's what I'd expect from an extraordinary God).
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A fascinating look at where the world of outré physics is going. Moderately-hard slogging, but probably worth it, although I do find myself with a question or two. I didn't finish it because it had to go back to the library--I'll have to re-borrow it sometime.
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The concept of additional spatial dimensions is as far from intuitive as any idea can be. Indeed, although Harvard physicist Randall does a very nice job of explaining—often deftly through the use of creative analogies—how our universe may have many unseen dimensions, readers' heads are likely to be swimming by the end of the book. Randall works hard to make her astoundingly complex material understandable, providing a great deal of background for recent advances in string and supersymmetry theory. As coauthor of the two most important scientific papers on this topic, she's ideally suited to popularize the idea. What is absolutely clear is that physicists simply do not yet know if there are extra dimensions a fraction of a millimeter in size, dimensions of infinite size or only the dimensions we see.
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Hard to read but quite enlightening with a lot of redundant passages. Style and short stories at the beginning of each chapter rather dull. Nevertheless recommendable for everyone who wants to broaden his horizons (in the truest sense of the word).
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Absolutely wonderful book. Lisa manages to describe without maths what is behind current theories in physics and the workings of the fundamental particles of all matter. She actually makes the unfolding mysteries of quarks and leptons fascinating reading, describing the paths that research has taken in the last 50 years or so and what is left to find out. You won't remember much of the details but what you will get is a general understanding of what they are looking for and how they do it.
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