Reader reviews for ChiRunning : A Revolutionary Approach to Effortless, Inju...

If you ever studied T'ai Chi Ch'uan for at least for a few months you'll probably agree with the author on many points. The book provides valuable tips for developing a rather effortless running style based on the principles of T'ai Chi. It was interesting read for me because I have never taught about applying my T'ai Chi experience to running. Now that the book presents the big picture I can see easily.But of course don't expect any magic happen instantly. The book is repetitive and there's a point to it, you need to be repetitive in some sense, too in order to benefit. You have to be actively monitoring what you're doing, too. If you are a runner and decide to attend to some T'ai Chi classes after this book you are going to understand what it is all about. Maybe the most important part of the book was the part where the author talked about the faces of children as they were running. Children are very relaxed and have fun. (And then we learn how to be stiff, stressed and focused on wrong things which takes a lot of training to get rid of).
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a must read for runners with A-type personalities. We're the dorks who, despite being intelligent and well educated, invariably make the mistake of over-training ourselves into injuries that blow our racing plans out of the water. Huh...maybe we're not so smart after all.

So what does this book have to offer the injury prone over achiever who would really like to keep running until the day they die? In simple terms: It encourages you to Chillax. To go with the flow. And stop fighting your body and the forces of nature. IMO, that's a lot better than running like an aggressive maniac, which will tear up your joints until you eventually need a knee or hip replacement.

Funny thing is, Dreyer has included a chapter that is sure to make any A-type runner grin: Peak Performance and Race-Specific Training. In the vernacular of Shaun of the Dead's Ed, these tidbits of wisdom are "Fried Gold".
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
No rating provided
Very interesting new take on how to run. The author runs about 35 miles per week and is still able to run ultramarathons without pain or injury--at an age most of us would consider it impossible!
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I picked up ChiRunning after just having hurt my foot from over-running it. Wrapping my head around the different methods used was difficult at first, but the new approach has proven very helpful. Many people already viewed some of my running methods as unconventional so testing out this new form of mechanics was not a big step. This book, along with a few others, have changed the way that I look toward training in athletics. Form comes first, and speed or distance flow out of a good form. Also, a big fundamental piece of the puzzle is that power flows out from the core, not the extremities.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I haven't read many running books and I suspect they have similarities, in that a large part of the beginning of the book was dedicated to telling us how excellent "Chi running" is. It's subtitled "A Revolutionary Approach to Effortless, Injury-Free Running". Basically, it's an anti- what he calls "power running" (building up muscles for running which are then a) heavy to move around b) restrictive of joint movement) and a call for a more flexible, tai-chi based idea of body-awareness, being in the moment and lightness of foot. Amongst the tai-chi theory (which is not pushed down your throat) and the slightly alien concept of running while inclined forwards, which is meant to make gravity help you run and avoid heel-striking (I'm going to try that in my run today) there is a lot of sensible and useful stuff - some great exercises for loosening up the joints and tendons, which I will be taking on board (some of the "loosening up" exercises are suspiciously similar to the usual runners' stretches) and some good solid advice on building form then distance then speed and preparing for a race. I was pleased to see I am already an exponent of some of his theories (keeping loose, body aware and relaxed on a downhill run, keeping the arms relaxed etc) but I would imagine most runners would fit this category in some way. Nice to see he recommends looking at yourself in a shop window to check posture - how I miss our Woolworths and McDonalds on the High Street for that!Still, an inspiring read, as I find the magazines and the other book I've read, and some good stuff to take away and try.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.