Reader reviews for Diecinueve minutos (Nineteen Minutes: Novela

I wasn't sure about this book when I started it. I don't step out of my comfort zone when I read much, so I gravitate back to the same authors over and over again. I was almost tempted to stop reading this book shortly into it. In fact, I did put it aside to read other things for a while, but in the end I am really glad that I picked it back up again.I could really identify with Peter, and could see what would bring him to do what he did. I could also identify with Josie and when the truth came out, I was proud of her for finally standing up for, not only herself, but for her friend. I think people could learn quite a bit from Josie and from Peter.I'd highly recommend it to everyone.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Obviously, the subject matter of this book is extremely difficult. I imagined I knew just exactly how the story was going to unfold; a troubled teen seeks revenge on his school. To my joy and surprise, this was only half of this story. This was my first title by Jodi Piccoult, who had come highly-recommended. I was completely taken back and touched by the narrative from the various points-of-view. Particularly fascinating to me was the view from Peter's mother and father. In the horror that surrounds such events, rarely is any thought given to the parents of the shooter. I suppose largely due to the fact that few of the shooters actually survive. Piccoult elevated this narrative to a new level by having the shooter survive and by telling part of the story from the mother's view. It enabled her to portray Peter as a sympathetic character; something that surprised me in my reading. Piccoult also kept the suspense in a story that we all thought we would know how ended. The story contained twists right up until the last page.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Picoult always takes the headline stories and develops a compelling story behind them. Her characters are well-developed and the story has plenty of ideas. But, as in My Sister's Keeper, I felt that the ending was a bit of a let-down. It seems that all the effort and good ideas weren't able to continue to the end in either story and at some point it turns into something more "popular" and less believeable. It disappoints me because up to that point the story is really so good....
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was an excellent book that captured the thought pattern of both the accused and victum of a terrible crime.It really makes you sit back and see the results of thougtless acts of bullying in school.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was my first Picoult novel. It started out fine. I liked her writing style and how the characters were developing. I have always enjoyed books that delve into the criminal mind. My first turn-off was when I came across some timeline errors about two thirds into the book. I don't remember the details, but I remember that I kept rereading the sections and going back to try to figure out what was going on. Thinking I must be completely nuts, I did some research on the web and found the others had noticed the same errors. Things went downhill from there climaxing with an ending that felt very contrived and unbelievable.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Heart wrenching story of tradegy in a small town and the repercussions it has on everyone.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Nineteen minutes is the time it takes Peter Houghton to destroy or corrupt the lives of numerous people connected to his school, including his own. In this novel, Picoult takes the reader through the aftermath of the shooting and the sensational trial, but, crucially, she also takes us through the events leading up to this shocking reaction, from before Peter’s birth. Obviously the central dramatic event of the novel is one that is very sensitive, and it is easy when reading most media reports to conclude that school shooters are born or raised evil; it is typical to assume that parents were to blame, because we need to assign blame in order to feel that we can avoid the same mistake. However, Picoult discourages such simplistic judgements as we see how Peter’s parents raise him with the best of intentions and witness the extent of the bullying he suffers. This may be far scarier to consider than simply apportioning blame, but the greater ambiguity is what makes the book worth reading.The first chapter introduces the dramatic event through a series of perspectives, but tellingly reveals deeply flawed relationships between parents and their children, and casual bullying at the school; there is a certain, implicit apportioning of blame. Intriguingly, although Peter’s actions and history may seem to be the centre of the novel, they are closely intertwined and linked to those of a fellow student and one time friend: Josie Cormier. Again, this is a key part of what makes this book an interesting read: how far is Josie responsible for what happens to Peter? Her own uncomfortable relationship with her mother and the uncomfortable events that happen to her are shown to be closely linked. Picoult suggests how important it is to really know and understand someone you claim to love. The character also allows the author to show insights into the ‘in-crowd’: Josie feels strongly that her seemingly safe position in the school’s social hierarchy is only secure if she continues to wear a mask that she seems uncomfortable wearing. At one point her boyfriend explicitly states that is there isn’t a ‘them’ then there isn’t an ‘us’, outlining succinctly why schools seem to operate by survival of the fittest. Picoult doesn’t suggest simple solutions, but she clearly outlines the problems, encouraging readers to develop their own opinions on these issues.Overall, the characters are interesting - Peter’s behaviour is alternatively chilling and frustrating - the ideas are engaging, the twists in the trial scene are as well choreographed as readers have come to expect from Picoult. Typically, the entire story of that fateful day is not fully pieced together until the final few pages, allowing for further dramatic revelations. Her dramatic twist is hinted at throughout but when it occurs it detracts from the main denouement, including Peter’s treatment and actions. It does, however, reinforce one of Picoult’s key messages: given the opportunity and the motive, anyone can become a killer.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm done with the Picoult (and now Delinsky) sensationalist style of women's fiction. Conflict can not be manufactured.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is my first Jodi Picoult book and I wish I could say I enjoyed it more than I did. The subject matter made the book heavy and sad, and perhaps this means Picoult is a talented writer, because I left the book feeling like I needed an anti-depressant.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
No rating provided
i read this book in 4 days..maybe less. it was so close to a real life situation and faced the realities of today's world..it made us (as the readers) start to think about how we act to people we label as like "nerds" or "weird" because anyone could turn around, any day and do something like he did..we need to all be really careful
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.