Reader reviews for On Writing: A Memoir Of The Craft

While I don't harbor any sincere fantasies of becoming a writer, this was still a fantastic read. Much of this book features small snippets of King's life that are written in an engaging style. I have been an off and on King reader since junior high but have never given a lot of thought to the man behind the books that caused me to run to my mom and dad's bedroom from time to time (not kidding here... I really think "It" scarred me); this gave me an opportunity to get to know him, if only slightly. The sections about writing were interesting as well, but like I said, I don't really see myself as a writer so I didn't dwell on them very long. The best parts were the ones about him, which proves one of his theses, "write what you know."
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This is probably the best book on writing I have ever read.
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Very inspiring book - and funny too. Interesting memoir and great advice for aspiring writers - boy does King hate adverbs.
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Funny, honest and useful.
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I love that this book is part autobiography and part writing tutor, and manages to walk the line between the two perfectly. It's funny and sharp and shows a side of King that many fans had never seen before.
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Reading this book was like having a conversation with Mr. King. It was an honest look at the process that he goes through while writing a book. Great advice provided for the would-be writer.
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When an author as prolific as Stephen King writes a book about writing, it is worth listening to. You don’t have to like King’s books to enjoy this one, however. What you’ll find is the genesis and development of King as a writer, an inside glimpse into an author’s reality, and extremely practical information and guidance on becoming a writer yourself. Great stuff by a brilliant and often underrated author.
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This delightful read is a fascinating account of how Stephen King became one of his generation's greatest storytellers. It is also an inspirational guide for anyone who wants to become a writer. His openness and honesty are endearing. His true-life account of almost getting killed is thrilling and heartbreaking. On the craft itself, King covers the field, from governing principles to detailed practical advice. He tells us what to him is important and what is unimportant. I have only one quibble: on page 224 of my hardback edition, King describes flashbacks as "boring and sort of corny." However, his 2006 novel "Lisey's Story" has flashbacks and flashbacks within flashbacks -- they are neither boring nor corny -- they're terrific!
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Incredibly awesome memoir penned by Stephen King. He takes us back in to his past and how he became a writer. Offers very useful tips for people interested in the craft. I actually laughed out loud a few times too! Stephen King is a very funny, smart guy. He's sorta my hero
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Big Steve tells it like it is…..a bit. In the same way that Parris sees his homosexuality as a fleeting impostor in his otherwise normal life, Big Steve skims over his alcoholism and cocaine addiction in about three pages, when actually this is what we want to read! The book gives us a tasty appetiser of what King’s autobiography could deliver – it would be a cracker – but I feel he’ll never write it. The horrors of his own mind are not to be uncovered, I’ll wager.I also enjoyed his brief coverage of the early years, his marriage to Tabitha, the fact they never had a dime, the people and places he worked with that inspired his ideas and the months leading up to the paperback publication of Carrie when life seriously began to change for the boy. But how the bottle offered the easiest way to deal with it is only tantalisingly referred to – if the aspiring, eventual axe-wielding author in The Shining is King himself, as King here tells us it undoubtedly was, then too right we want to know more. We don’t get it though. In a book entitled “On Writing”, can someone please explain how you can write “Cujo” so pissed that you subsequently can’t remember anything of the whole period? There’s so much missed out between the lines that we really, really need to know more, Big Man.Otherwise, the book tells us of how King writes and gives some hints but, to use one of King’s analogies, if Eric Clapton says he plays his best stuff in his garden shed, it doesn’t mean that if you haul your guitar down there for even eight hours a day, you’ll also play like Eric!
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