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Citations - How to MAKE People BELIEVE You

Citations - How to MAKE People BELIEVE You

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Published by Bob Hurt
This January 2009 article describes citations of proof sources for written works, motivates the reader to use them, and summarizes the major style guides that define citations. It focuses on APA, MLA, Turabian, and CMS styles. It offers numerous links to on-line resources.

The author published the original article of the same title at http://groups.google.com/group/Lawmen on 9 January 2009
This January 2009 article describes citations of proof sources for written works, motivates the reader to use them, and summarizes the major style guides that define citations. It focuses on APA, MLA, Turabian, and CMS styles. It offers numerous links to on-line resources.

The author published the original article of the same title at http://groups.google.com/group/Lawmen on 9 January 2009

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Published by: Bob Hurt on Jan 10, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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09/22/2010

 
Citations - How to
MAKE 
People
BELIEVE 
You
Copyright © 9 Janurary 2009 by Bob Hurt. All rightsreserved. Author hereby permits distribution of this work, textually unmodified, without restriction.
Executive Summary 
- This article explains citations of proof sources, why they havegreat importance to your credibility, and how easily you can put them in your work. Itseeks to convince you to follow a style guide in documenting the sources of yourinformation when you write. It links you to an excellent automated citation tool - theCitation Machine - and to numerous online style guides. See attached style guides forcitations.
Cite in bibliography
as:
Bob Hurt. (2001, 9 January). Article:
Citations - How to Make PeopleBelieve You.
Retrieved <date> from the Lawmen Google Group:http://groups.google.com/group/Lawmen 
Cite in-line
(if bibliography, end note, or foot note contains above entry) as:
 According to one writer (Bob Hurt, 2009) readers "always think data-craving thoughts" (2nd paragraph, "Introduction and Motivation").i
 
Citations - How to Make People Believe You
ii
Contents
 
Citations - How to Make People Believe You
Introduction and Motivation
The 1100+Lawmen Groupsubscribers have a broad array of educations, avocations,professions, and callings. Some have magnificent cognitive abilities that they use to goodeffect when drafting and publishing letters, messages, articles, pleadings, motions,memoranda, and the like. Few or none use available, easily accessible resources to citetheir sources concisely, accurately, repletely, and professionally. And THAT makes their work less credible. Why?Because readers (I for one) always think data-craving thoughts like:
 
 Who told you that preposterous nonsense?
 
How did you come up with that inane idea?
 
 Where did you get that unlikely fact?
 
How can I study that further?
 
How do I connect that with what I already know?
 
Oh, really? Why?
 
 What else did the originator have to say?
 
 Where did you read, see, experience, or hear that?
Enter the Citation
 A single literary tool can help you answer such questions before or as they arise - theCITATION. A citation consists of a concise statement of the source of a writer's or speaker's data.Few tools will serve you better to get people to believe what you have to express becausethe citation specifically identifies the:
 
source media type (speech, interview, seminar, notes, phone conversation, TV show, movie, book, magazine, physical object, article, web site)
 
source name (of book, article, movie, art work, seminar, web site)
 
sub-source (as in a web page in a web site or article in a magazine)
 
publication date and, if necessary time)
 
publishing company 
 
publisher location
 
author of data (typically a person's name)
 
page number
Why Do I Need All That in a Citation?
Most web-based writing can include hyperlinks to sources. You would use hyperlinks inemails, blogs, web sites, email lists, including word processor output to PDF(POSTSCRIPT (or Portable) Display Format) files for web publication. When you have little time to mess around with the tedious and arcane requirements forproper, standard citations, you will typically include only a hyperlink to the source webpage. But this method has a number of serious drawbacks:1

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