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Climate Change as a Driver of Humanitarian Crises and Response

Climate Change as a Driver of Humanitarian Crises and Response

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This paper explores the relationships between climate change, humanitarian crises and humanitarian response through a review of published and grey literature. We examine the historical evidence for associations between climate change and humanitarian crises, and move on to a brief review of present humanitarian crises directly attributable to disasters triggered by climatological events. Finally, we look at three interrelated aspects of future trends: changing weather patterns, increasing societal vulnerabilities, and shifting demographics. We conclude with some thoughts on the policy and practical implications for the aid community, academia, and donor and crisis-affected states, emphasizing the need to shift from a mindset in which crisis response is exceptional and interventionist to one in which managing crises is seen as the norm, part of sovereignty and internalized within more formal international and national arrangements.

This document is available for download at our website: http://fic.tufts.edu.
This paper explores the relationships between climate change, humanitarian crises and humanitarian response through a review of published and grey literature. We examine the historical evidence for associations between climate change and humanitarian crises, and move on to a brief review of present humanitarian crises directly attributable to disasters triggered by climatological events. Finally, we look at three interrelated aspects of future trends: changing weather patterns, increasing societal vulnerabilities, and shifting demographics. We conclude with some thoughts on the policy and practical implications for the aid community, academia, and donor and crisis-affected states, emphasizing the need to shift from a mindset in which crisis response is exceptional and interventionist to one in which managing crises is seen as the norm, part of sovereignty and internalized within more formal international and national arrangements.

This document is available for download at our website: http://fic.tufts.edu.

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Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: Feinstein International Center on Jul 18, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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07/19/2012

 
Strengthening the humanity and dignity of people in crisis through knowledge and practice
Climate Change as a Driver of Humanitarian Crises and Response
Peter Walker (Feinstein International Center, Tufts University) Josh Glasser (Harvard Schoolof Public Health), Shubhada Kambli (Graduate School of Design, Harvard University)
 JUNE 2012
 
Feinstein International Center 2
 
Cover Photo:
 A man on horseback rides through a sandstorm in Niger’s Tillaberiregion in the southwest
.
© Jaspreet Kindra/IRIN
©2012 Feinstein International Center. All Rights Reserved.Fair use of this copyrighted material includes its use for non-commercial educationalpurposes, such as teaching, scholarship, research, criticism, commentary, and newsreporting. Unless otherwise noted, those who wish to reproduce text and image filesfrom this publication for such uses may do so without the Feinstein InternationalCenter’s express permission. However, all commercial use of this material and/orreproduction that alters its meaning or intent, without the express permission of theFeinstein International Center, is prohibited.Feinstein International Center Tufts University 114 Curtis StreetSomerville, MA 02144USA tel: +1 617.627.3423fax: +1 617.627.3428fic.tufts.edu
 
Abstract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62. Defining Humanitarian Crises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73. The Nature and Meaning of Humanitarian Response . . . . . . . 94. Looking to the Past . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105. Looking at the Present . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136. Anticipating the Future of Climate Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . .157. Anticipating Changes in Population Vulnerability . . . . . . . . . .208. State Responses to Future Crisis Loads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .269. Humanitarian System Response to Future Crisis Loads . . . . . .2810. Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
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