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Simple Teachings on Higher Truths - Ajahn Akicano

Simple Teachings on Higher Truths - Ajahn Akicano

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Published by Dhamma Thought

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Published by: Dhamma Thought on Jul 20, 2012
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09/06/2013

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Introduction
The mind has been spinning all morning, trying to work everythingout. We would like to get on with our meditation, but need toresolve this first. It’s about the practice. Meditating seems harderthese days: less remarkable, less relaxing. Lately there’s been a lot of uninvited thinking going on. Something has been drudging up worries, possibilities, old memories, song lyrics.... Hadn’t we gonebeyond all this? Nevermind, though. We probably just need achange of scene.Surely it’s the monastery itself. Reflecting on some aspectsof the place, it seems that things could be better. It could be quieter,for one; there could be less people. The weather could definitely be better, cooler. Maybe we could plant some more trees? Andcertainly we ought to be able to work out the schedule a bit moreefficiently. More time for meditation, less chores. If things weredifferent, we could get beyond all this suffering and discontent,right? Actually, at the moment there is time. Nothing is beingasked of us. But how could we sit in meditation with this feeling
 
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hanging around? It’s the lingering unease of uncertainty, of unresolved doubts. Things are not clear. When we try to work out the immediate future, just the next couple months, say, it is stillnot clear. We are imagining, what if-ing, and there are many looseends. We are thinking that maybe we would benefit from a changeof scene. Either a stay at another monastery or some retreat time,off in the forest. Would that solve things? Hmmm. Lets just figurethis out and then the mind will be peaceful and we can get on withthe real work… We know we’ve got to go to see our teacher, Ajahn Anan. We would like to work this out ourself, to reason the mind intosubmission, but we’ve been here before. At the moment our mindis a churning, foaming, river eddy. Our mind is a jabbering idiot, arenegade webpage gone mad with pop-up windows. It will most definitely not be reasoned with. It will not be thought intosubmission. But if we pay Ajahn Anan a visit, things might get resolved. In our forest tradition we take the Ajahn as our mentor,our leader…our father. We rely on him for guidance and advicebecause he has taken the road of Dhamma before us.It is nearly 11 am. The need to ease the agitation in themind has not diminished; if anything, it has become more urgent.So we set off briskly, striding up the hill in the direction of Ajahn Anan’s kuti. When we arrive a few minutes later, we find himattending to his duties. At the moment he is talking with some lay 

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