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Table Of Contents

Meet Perl
1.1 Perl’s Default Behaviour
1.1.1 Our first Perl program
1.1.2 Perl’s default variable
1.1.3 The strange first line explained
1.2 Using Variables in Perl
1.2.1 One of something: scalars
1.2.2 A collection of somethings: arrays and lists
1.2.3 Hashes
1.2.4 References
1.2.5 Built-in variables
1.2.6 Scoping with local, my and our
1.6.4 In-built subroutines
1.6.5 References to subroutines
1.7 Perl I/O
1.7.1 Variable interpolation
1.8 Packages, Modules and Objects
1.8.1 Modules
1.8.2 Objects
1.8.3 The joy of CPAN
1.9 More Perl
1.10 Where To From Here?
1.11 Print Resources
1.12 Web Resources
Snooping
2.1 Thank You, Tim Potter
2.2 Preparing To Snoop
2.2.1 Installing NetPacket::*
2.2.2 Installing Net::Pcap
2.2.3 Installing Net::PcapUtils
2.2.4 Online documentation
2.2.5 Configuring your network interface
2.3 Building Low-Level Snooping Tools
2.3.1 loop=open+next
2.3.2 Optional parameters: loop and open
2.3.3 Optional parameters: the callback function
2.3.4 Ethernet Analysis
2.3.5 EtherSnooper (v0.01)
2.3.6 EtherSnooper (v0.02)
2.3.7 EtherSnooper (v0.03)
2.3.8 Displaying IP addresses
2.4 Snooping IP Datagrams
2.4.1 EtherSnooper (v0.05)
2.4.2 EtherSnooper (v0.06)
2.5 Transport Snoopers
2.5.1 Preparing to snoop UDP
2.5.2 Preparing to snoop TCP
2.5.3 The TCP and UDP gotcha!
2.5.4 Application traffic monitoring
2.5.5 EtherSnooper (v0.07)
2.6 The Network Debugger
2.6.1 Processing command-line parameters
2.6.2 Storing captured results
2.6.3 The NetDebug source code
2.7 Where To From Here?
2.8 Print Resources
2.9 Web Resources
Sockets
3.1 Clients and Servers
3.1.1 Client characteristics
3.1.2 Server characteristics
3.2 Transport Services
3.2.1 Unreliable transport
3.2.2 Reliable transport
3.3 Introducing the Perl Socket API
3.4 Socket Support Subroutines
3.4.1 inet_aton and inet_ntoa
3.4.2 Socket addresses
3.4.3 getservbyname and getservbyport
3.4.4 getprotobyname and getprotobynumber
3.4.5 gethostbyname and gethostbyaddr
3.5 Simple UDP Clients and Servers
3.5.1 Testing with localhost
3.5.2 The first UDP server
3.5.3 The first UDP client
3.6 Genericity and Robustness
3.7 UDP Is Unreliable
3.7.1 No flow control
3.8 Sending and Receiving with UDP
3.9 Dealing with Deadlock
3.9.1 Specifying a time-out
3.9.2 Checking for data
3.9.3 Spawning a subprocess
3.10 TCP Clients and Servers
3.10.1 The first TCP server
3.10.2 The first TCP client
3.11 A Common TCP Gotcha
3.12 More TCP Socket Communication
3.12.1 The remote syntax checker server
3.12.2 The remote syntax checker client
3.14.3 An object-oriented client and server
3.15 Where To From Here?
3.16 Print Resources
3.17 Web Resources
Protocols
4.1 Gotcha!
4.1.1 What’s the deal with newline?
4.2 Working with the Web
4.2.1 HTTP requests and responses
4.3 The World’s Worst Web Browser
4.3.1 Embedded graphics
4.3.2 A persistent wwwb
4.3.3 A better get_resource
4.4 HTTP Status Codes
4.7 The LWPwwwb Program
4.8 Doing More with LWPwwwb
4.8.1 Parsing HTML
4.8.2 Some parsewwwb examples
4.8.3 The HTML::Parser examples
4.9 Building a Custom Web Server
4.9.1 The custom Web server source code
4.9.2 The custom Web server in action
4.10 The libnet Library
4.10.1 Working with Usenet
4.10.2 The news reading source code
4.11 Email Enabling simplehttpd
4.11.1 The simple mail transfer protocol
4.11.2 The Net::SMTP module
4.11.3 Creating simplehttp2d
4.12 Other Networking Add-On Modules
4.12.1 Installing Net::Telnet
4.12.2 A Net::Telnet example
4.13 Where To From Here?
4.14 Print Resources
4.15 Web Resources
Management
5.1 Simple Management with ICMP
5.2 Doing the Ping Thing
5.2.1 Some ping examples
5.3 Doing the Net::Ping Thing
5.4 Tracing Routes
5.4.1 How traceroute works
5.5 Not So Simple Management with SNMP
5.5.1 A little SNMP history
5.6 The SNMP Management Framework
5.7 Managed Data
5.7.1 The TCP/IP MIB
5.8 The SNMP Protocol
5.8.1 SNMP’s operational model
5.8.2 A brief tour of SNMPv1, SNMPv2 and SNMPv3
5.8.3 SNMP communities
5.9 The Net::SNMP Module
5.9.1 The Net::SNMP methods
5.10 Working With Net::SNMP
5.10.1 Working with mnemonic object identifiers
5.10.2 The udpstats source code
5.10.3 The howlongup program
5.11 What’s Up?
5.11.1 Being more careful
5.12 Setting MIB-II Data
5.13 IP Router Mapping
5.14 Where To From Here?
5.15 Print Resources
5.16 Web Resources
Mobile Agents
6.1 What is a Mobile Agent?
6.1.1 Mobile agent=code+state
6.1.2 What is a mobile-agent environment?
6.2 Mobile-Agent Examples
6.2.1 Revisiting multiwho
6.2.2 Revisiting ipdetermine
6.3 Mobile-Agent Advantages/Disadvantages
6.4 Perl Agents
6.4.1 Preparing Perl for mobile agents
6.5 The Agent.pm Module
6.6 Ooooh, Objects!
6.7 The Default Mobile Agent
6.8 A Launching Mobile-Agent Environment
6.9 A One-Shot Location
6.10 Relocating To Multiple Locations
6.10.1 Processing multiple mobile agents
6.10.2 Identifying multiple locations
6.10.3 A multi-location mobile agent
6.11 The Mobile-Agent multiwho
6.12 The Mobile-Agent ipdetermine
6.13 The Cloning Mobile-Agent ipdetermine
6.14 Other Perl Agent Examples
6.15 Where To From Here?
6.16 Print Resources
6.17 Web Resources
Index
P. 1
Programming the Network with Perl

Programming the Network with Perl

Ratings: (0)|Views: 2,594|Likes:
Published by Wiley
After providing an introduction to the Perl programming language, this helpful guide teaches computer networking using Perl. Topics discussed include ethernet network analysis, programming standard Internet protocols, and exploring mobile agent programming.
* Each chapter provides a general discussion of the technologies under consideration, the support for programming the technologies as provided by Perl, and implementations of working examples
* Covers Mobile Agent Technology, which is set to become one of the "next big things" on the Internet
* Further information is supplied, including a listing of Web and print resources, programming exercises, and tips to expand the reader's understanding of the material
After providing an introduction to the Perl programming language, this helpful guide teaches computer networking using Perl. Topics discussed include ethernet network analysis, programming standard Internet protocols, and exploring mobile agent programming.
* Each chapter provides a general discussion of the technologies under consideration, the support for programming the technologies as provided by Perl, and implementations of working examples
* Covers Mobile Agent Technology, which is set to become one of the "next big things" on the Internet
* Further information is supplied, including a listing of Web and print resources, programming exercises, and tips to expand the reader's understanding of the material

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Publish date: Jan 10, 2003
Added to Scribd: Jul 23, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9780470849415
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