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Document #8 - Chief Librarian's Report

Document #8 - Chief Librarian's Report

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Published by Gary Romero

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Published by: Gary Romero on Jul 24, 2012
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07/24/2012

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T
he
C
hief
L
ibrarian
s
eporT
Library News HighlightsJuly 25, 2012
1. a
naCosTia
L
ibrary
W
ins
 
The
n
aTionaL
iiDa/aLaa
WarD
 
This biennial competition iscosponsored by the InternationalInterior Design Association(IIDA) and the AmericanLibrary Association (ALA).The award honors excellence inlibrary interior design. Awardwinners demonstrate excellencein aesthetics, design, creativity, function, and satisfaction of the client’s objectives.The competition is managed by the LLAMA Buildings and Equipment Section. Jeff Bonvecchio, DCPL’s Director of Capital Projects accepted the award at the Annual ALAConference in Anaheim, CA, and was joined by the Project’s Interior Designer, KathrynTaylor, a Senior Associate with The Freelon Group, and Cherylle Durst, Executive VicePresident at IIDA.
2. DCpL e
arns
s
peCiaL
eCogniTion
 
for 
h
isToriC
p
reservaTion
The DC Historic Preservation Ofce and Ofce of Planning honored the Georgetown
 Neighborhood Library project during the Ninth Annual Awards for Excellence with aStewardship Award for the careful restoration of the building in the aftermath of the
2007 re. The award recognized Jerry McCoy’s role in preserving the Peabody RoomCollection during and after the re. The same ceremony brought recognition for the
 publication,
 Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Library Design Guidelines
, for DCPL’sefforts to plan the future of this landmark building. The awards ceremony for historic preservation was held, appropriately, at the Sixth and I Historic Synagogue. Mayor Vincent Gray was the presenter. 
Document #8Board of Library Trustees MeetingJuly 25, 2012
 
3.
iDs
, T
Weens
 
anD
T
eens
s
ign
U
p
 
for 
s
Ummer 
 
eaDing
 Dream Big—Read!
and
Own the Night 
are the national themesDCPL is using for this summers reading programs for children andteens, respectively. The major kick-off event was held at the Libraryof Congress and featured Walter Dean Myers, the newly appointedambassador for reading for kids. A well-attended kick-off for teens was held at MLK Library, with live music from Cops ComeKnockin’, a photo booth, a giant chess game, refreshments, and
rafe prizes. DCPL has been working with a collaborative of nine
DC Public Schools to promote summer reading and together entice
students to nd the magic in books all summer long. The approach is
working well: In the teens’ program, registrations by the end of Junewere within 200 of doubling last summer’s numbers.
4.
 I 
gnIte 
 
the 
 park 
T
eCh
C
amp
s
eTs
 
The
i
magi
-
naTion
 
on
f
ire
A partnership between the Adaptive Services Divisionand the Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind gave 12 blindand low-vision teens the opportunity to learn all theycould do with the latest technology. Adaptive Servicestech instructor Chris Corrigan led advanced JAWSscreen-reader users through techniques for searchingless-than-accessible websites, reading Wikipedia entries,watching YouTube videos on current events and the FirstAmendment, and downloading digital Talking Books from the Library for the Blind
BARD website. Volunteer Shannon McMahon taught new JAWS users the basics of 
computer use with assistive software. Campers took an accessible tour of the Newseum,and learned to download their own TV broadcast session recorded during the visit.
 
5. sTar g
eTs
e
ven
b
eTTer 
 
An internship program at William and Mary College brought an intern with a special interest in children’sliterature to DCPL. At the same time, the AmericanLibrary Association issued new guidelines for early
literacy workshops through its Every Child Ready toRead@ the Library program. Pam Rogers, a DCPL
volunteer, is a librarian who trained in the new program. She worked with the intern to update DCPL’s
STAR scripts for teacher leaders, and then tested the
new training at a parenting program with very positiveresults.
2
 
6. T
he
C
ommUniTy
m
aKes
U
se
 
of
T
heir 
L
ibraries
The intense series of electric storms that struck DC, Maryland, and
•
Virginia on Friday, June 29
th
, left close to 500,000 homes in the areawithout power. With temperatures in the high 90s and low 100s,
DCPL kept ve libraries—Anacostia, William O. Lockridge/Bellevue,Dorothy I. Height/Benning, Tenley-Friendship, and MLK Libraries— 
open until 9 PM that Saturday and open again on Sunday from 1 PM to9 PM. More than 50 DCPL staff members volunteered to work and staylate or come in from home. Thank you!DCPL is once again participating in the District’s Free Summer 
•
Meals Program. The program runs from July 2
nd
through August 10
th
,from 1-2:30 PM, Monday through Friday, at Anacostia, William O.
Lockridge/Bellevue, Capitol View, Dorothy I. Height/Benning, FrancisA. Gregory, Juanita Thornton/Shepherd Park, Lamond-Riggs, Petworth,
Mount Pleasant, Southwest, Woodridge, and MLK Libraries.
The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) hosted a
•
naturalization and immigration information session at MLK Library.USCIS representatives discussed naturalization eligibility and residencyrequirements for becoming a U.S. citizen, along with the application process and the naturalization test. Attendees were given an overviewof U.S. history and civics principles, observed a mock naturalization
interview, and left with educational materials and contact informationfor follow-up.
7. T
heLma
J
ones
W
ay
” U
nveiLeD
n
ear 
a
naCosTia
 L
ibrary
 
City ofcials and many others who have been touched by Thelma Jones’
work over the years came out to honor Ms. Jones by unveiling “ThelmaJones Way” near the Anacostia Library. Ms. Jones’ community activism of 30+ years has had many successes, often in the service of youth and in theinterest of bringing the voice of people in public housing in southwest DC
to the city’s public ofcials. A strong library champion, Ms. Jones worked
at the World Bank for 33 years, until her retirement in 2005. Isn’t DClucky that Ms. Jones’ mother decided that her daughter should leave NorthCarolina after she graduated from college and live with her aunt in DC?
3

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