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Diastema Spring

Diastema Spring

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Published by: BruinASDA on Jul 29, 2012
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SPRING 2012 | VOLUME 9 | ISSUE 1
FEATURE STORIES
ASDA Welcome Address
UCLA
 
School of Dentistry 
ASDA Special NeedsCommitteeResearch: MouthwashEliminates CariesWhat Lies Behind ClinicDoors?Faculty Interview:Dr. Fisher
T  
Diastema
Dental Education:New Oral SurgeryRequirements
W
hen Dr. John Yagiela passed away on February 21, 2012, the UCLA School of Denstry com
-
munity lost one of its most endeared members. Dr. Yagiela was a Disnguished Professor inthe eld of Dental Anesthesiology unl his rerement last year. A revered lecturer and passionatementor, he also served on the American Dental Board of Anesthesiology and was President of theAmerican Society of Denst Anesthesiologists. He was recognized for his immense contribuonsto the eld by receiving a myriad of awards, and his textbook, Pharmacology and Therapeucs forDenstry, was considered the standard reference for dental students alike across the country.When asked about Dr. Yagiela’s contribuons to the school, Dr. Barrie Kenney, a colleague of his forover thirty years, said that: “Dr. Yagiela was integral in developing the reputaon of this school andmaking it one of the best in the world. He also played a central role in developing the renowneddental anesthesiology program here at UCLA and worked to make dental anesthesiology an ADArecognized specialty.”As those in the Dental Anesthesiology community will mourn the loss of a great mind, his studentswill also miss his passionate lectures and mentorship. What made him a great educator, however,was not only intellectual prowess and his unique ability to communicate complex subjects to stu
-
dents, but it was also his upbeat personality, sense of humor, and passion for teaching. “Dr. Yagielawas one of the biggest names walking around UCLA. At the same me, he was sll one of the mostapproachable,” recalls Sarah Koyama, a second-year dental student.Dr. Yagiela is survived by his son, daughter, and ve grandchildren. A memorial service was held onSaturday, April 7th at the UCLA Neuroscience Research Building Auditorium.By Kent Lau
 
 
 ASDA Welcome Address
UCLA ASDA Members,
O
n behalf of the execuve cabinet of UCLA ASDA, it is mygreat pleasure to welcome all students, faculty and sta toanother great year at the UCLA School of Denstry. UCLA ASDAhas been working diligently to launch an extensive slate of eventsthis year designed to help students navigate dental school andto advocate on behalf of dental students at the local, state andnaonal level.From health fairs and school visits to the newly created specialneeds outreach events, UCLA ASDA is commied to providingplenful opportunies for students to reach out and support thecommunity, both locally and abroad. In the last year alone, our
ASDA chapter has increased the schedule of Lunch-and-Learn
seminars and informaonal sessions solely to make sure you arereceiving informaon about the important issues aecng thedental profession beyond dental school. ASDA is also commitedto easing the burden of dental school by increasing the number of tutorials, student panels and stress-relievingmorale events. All members are encouraged to get involved and to bring new ideas or suggesons to the ExecuveCabinet so ASDA can connue to improve.It is with great pride that I am able to report that the UCLA ASDA chapter was honored with the presgious IdealASDA Award in 2011, receiving this recognion for the second consecuve year. This award recognizes UCLA as theoverall strongest chapter of all 61 dental schools across the country. This year, we were awarded for our achieve
-
ments with the presgious Gold Crown in Fundraising and also received 1st Place in the ASDA/Crest Oral-B Commu
-
nity Denstry Category. The Execuve Cabinet would like to congratulate all UCLA ASDA members, as their dedica
-
on to becoming leaders in the community and advocates of organized denstry enables UCLA to be an example forother dental schools and a connued source of opmism for the future of the profession.Thank you again for your dedicaon and involvement in ASDA and we look forward to another outstanding year!Best Regards,Ma Sandre
UCLA ASDA PresidentUCLA SOD Class of 2013
Table of Contents
ASDA Welcome Address.............................................................................................................................................................................................2Health: Piercings o the Oral Cavity and Oral Health........................................................................................................................................3Opposing Cusps: Anti-Mid-Level Provider...........................................................................................................................................................4Opposing Cusps: Pro Mid-level Provider..............................................................................................................................................................4ASDA: Big-sib ASDA program...................................................................................................................................................................................6Main Story: ASDA Special Needs Committee.....................................................................................................................................................7What Lies Beneath Clinic Doors...............................................................................................................................................................................8Events: American Association o Women in Dentistry.....................................................................................................................................9Faculty Interview: Dr. Fisher....................................................................................................................................................................................10Games – Factual Faculty Factoids.........................................................................................................................................................................12Research: Mouthwash eliminates caries.............................................................................................................................................................13Dental Education: New Oral Surgery Requirements......................................................................................................................................14 Taking Of the Loupes: Seeing the bigger picture o ASDA........................................................................................................................15
2UCLA School of Dentistry | ASDA
 
Whether through the lower lip, tongue, or
cheek, oral and perioral piercings have un
-
doubtedly become increasingly popularamong the adolescent and young adult popu
-
laon. These rings, studs, and loops havenot escaped the aenon of oral healthcareprofessionals who queson the short-termand long-term eects of this jewelry on den
-
tal and systemic health. As a result, denstsshould be informed of these sequelae becausepaents may present either before acquir
-
ing a piercing to inquire about the risks or inneed of urgent care immediately aerwards.While most paents are well aware of the lin
-gering pain of a newly inserted piercing, few
are familiar with some of the potenal short-term consequences of even a correctly placedpiercing into such a highly vascularized and in
-
nervated part of the body. In addion to thepotenal to develop major hemorrhage, lasngparesthesia, or permanent hypogeusia, 50%of paents will experience painful ulceraonand inammaon that last 3-5 weeks and thatmay aect degluon, mascaon, and respi
-
raon. Furthermore, the connued presenceof jewelry in the oral cavity (especially thatmade of stainless steel) facilitates the entry of 
pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, A
group and beta-hemolyc Streptococcus, Pseu
-
domonas aeruginosa, and Erysipelas. Theseinfecons can easily spread through nearbylymph nodes and subsequently to vital or
-
gans, for instance in the case of endocardis.In addion to experiencing mild to serious al
-
lergic reacons (such as contact dermas)to the jewelry itself, paents also risk con
-
taminaon by infecous diseases as a resultof improperly sterilized equipment. Such dis
-
eases include hepas B and C, HIV, tetanus,syphilis, and tuberculosis, as well as a varietyof condions caused by herpes simplex vi
-
rus, Epstein-Barr virus, and Candida albicans.Moreover, the constant presence of a foreignobject in the mouth may cause lasng conse
-
quences on both the denon and surround
-
ing so ssues. One study found enamel lossin 80% of paents with tongue piercings, dueto constantly playing with the jewelry. Unin
-
tenonal orthodonc movement has also beenreported to occur. In one interesng case, awoman with a barbell-shaped piercing pre
-
sented with a midline diastema between themaxillary central incisors (see image). Paentsshould be aware of these long-term risks priorto acquiring a piercing, if possible, as removalof the piercing if so desired may become dif 
-
cult if epithelial ssue (for instance, in theform of hypertrophic or cheloid scars) growsover the inseron wound. Furthermore, themetal piercing provides a greater surface areafor food parcles, plaque, and calculus to col
-
lect, resulng in halitosis and gingivis, espe
-cially in the region of the piercing. Constant
irritaon of ssues by jewelry may also leadto localized gingival recession, horizontal boneloss, and increased periodontal pocket depth,depending on the locaon of the piercing.Finally, densts must consider how oral andperioral piercings may impact dental work.First and foremost, densts should rememberto remove all metal objects above the neck,including piercings, prior to x-ray examina
-
ons to avoid inclusion of interfering arfacts.Second, when considering large restoraons(especially those of porcelain) in paents withpiercings, clinicians should remember thatpiercings increase the risk of cusp fractures.Thirdly, when selecng a material for a directrestoraon, densts should opt for compos
-
ite instead of amalgam since the discrepancyin reducon potenal between certain met
-
als and amalgam may lead to corrosion of therestoraon and pulpal sensivity. Finally, eventhough paents may not always wear theirpiercings to dental appointments, piercingsshould be considered in dierenal diagno
-
ses for both so and hard ssue alteraons.Though the eects of perioral and oral piercingsmay not have been covered extensively in Peri
-
odoncs or Oral Pathology, bearing these consid
-
eraons in mind will allow dental students (andfuture densts) to provide their paents withthe comprehensive care that UCLA emphasizes.
Piercings of the Oral Cavity and Oral Health
By Khushbu Aggarwal
ORAL HEALTH
 
The
Diastema
 
Winter 2012
Vol.
9 Issue 13

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