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Australian Bee Genus Tricocolletes

Australian Bee Genus Tricocolletes

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Published by draculavanhelsing
Revision of the Australian Bee Genus Trichocolletes Cockerell
(Hymenoptera: Colletidae: Paracolletini)
Revision of the Australian Bee Genus Trichocolletes Cockerell
(Hymenoptera: Colletidae: Paracolletini)

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Published by: draculavanhelsing on Jul 30, 2012
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 AUSTRALIAN MUSEUMSCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
Australian Museum science is freely accessible online athttp://publications.australianmuseum.net.au6 College Street, Sydney NSW 2010, Australia
nature culture
 
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Batley, Michael, and Terry F. Houston, 2012. Revision of the Australian beegenus
Trichocolletes 
Cockerell (Hymenoptera: Colletidae: Paracolletini).
Records of the Australian Museum
64(1): 1–50. [Published 23 May 2012].http://dx.doi.org/10.3853/j.0067-1975.64.2012.1589ISSN 0067-1975Published by the Australian Museum, Sydney 
 
* author for correspondence
© The Authors, 2012. Journal compilation © Australian Museum, Sydney, 2012
 Records of the Australian Museum
(2012) Vol. 64: 1–50. ISSN 0067-1975http://dx.doi.org/10.3853/j.0067-1975.64.2012.1589
Revision of the Australian Bee Genus
Trichocolletes
Cockerell(Hymenoptera: Colletidae: Paracolletini)
M
ichael
B
atley
1
*
and
t
erry
F. h
ouston
2
1
Australian Museum, 6 College Street, Sydney NSW 2010, Australiamichael.batley@gmail.com
2
Western Australian Museum, Locked Bag 49, Welshpool D.C. WA 6986, AustraliaTerry.Houston@museum.wa.gov.au
The monobasic genus
Trichocolletes
(Cockerell, 1912) waserected for the species
 Lamprocolletes venustus
Smith byvirtue of its conspicuously hairy eyes. Rayment (1929, 1931)added four additional species so that Cockerell’s 1934 surveyof the family Colletidae in Australia, listed ve names in thegenus
Trichocolletes.
When Michener (1965) revised thegenera of Australian bees, he recognized that species withouthairy eyes, previously placed in
 Anthoglossa
and
Paracolletes
,belonged in a more broadly dened genus. At the same timeMichener created a separate subgenus for the species
T. pulcherrimus
Michener, a decision he recently suggested(Michener, 2007) might merit reexamination. Since 1965,two new species have been added (Houston, 1990), but therehas been no revision of the genus. This is, therefore, the rstspecies-level revision of the genus
Trichocolletes
.A recent molecular phylogeny of the family Colletidae(Almeida & Danforth, 2009) concluded that the Australianand South American genera traditionally included in thetribe Paracolletini (Michener, 2007), excluding
Callomelitta
 and
Paracolletes s. str.,
form a monophyletic group and ithas been proposed (Almeida
et al
., 2012) that the nameNeopasiphaeinae should be used for this group. Thephylogenetic analysis suggested that the genus
 Anthoglossa
 is sister to all other Neopasiphaeinae and the genus
Trichocolletes
is, in turn, sister to all Neopasiphaeinae otherthan
 Anthoglossa
. Until morphological clarication of thestatus of 
Paracolletes
is available, we have opted to followMichener’s (2007) family-level names.
a
Bstract
. The endemic Australian bee genus
Trichocolletes
is revised. Forty species are recognised,including twenty-three new species:
Trichocolletes aeratus, T. albigenae, T. avialis, T. brachytomus, T.brunilabrum, T. capillosus, T. centralis, T. dundasensis, T. fuscus, T. gelasinus, T. grandis, T. lacaris,T. leucogenys, T. luteorufus, T. macrognathus, T. micans, T. nitens, T. orientalis, T. platyprosopis, T.serotinus, T. simus, T. soror 
and
T. tuberatus
. Four new synonymies are proposed:
Paracolletes marginatuslucidus
Cockerell, 1929 =
T. chrysostomus
(Cockerell, 1929);
T. daviesiae
Rayment, 1931 =
T. venustus
 (Smith, 1862);
T. marginatulus
Michener, 1965 =
T. sericeus
(Smith, 1862);
T. nigroclypeatus
Rayment,1929 =
T. venustus
(Smith, 1862).
Trichocolletes rufus
(Rayment, 1930) is moved to
 Leioproctus
and
T.rufopilosus
(Rayment, 1935) to
 Anthoglossa
. Descriptions are given for new species and redescriptionsfor species described before 1965, including rst descriptions of males of 
T. aureotinctus
(Cockerell),
T.burnsi
Michener,
T. latifrons
(Cockerell) and
T. maximus
(Cockerell) and the females of 
T. dowerinensis
 Rayment and
T. rubasis
(Cockerell). Lectotypes are designated for
 Lamprocolletes venustus
Smith and
 Anthoglossa plumata
Smith. Keys to species are provided for both sexes, as are distribution maps and asummary of recorded oral visitation.
B
atley
, M
ichael
,
and
t
erry
F. h
ouston
. 2012. Revision of the Australian bee genus
Trichocolletes
Cockerell(Hymenoptera: Colletidae: Paracolletini).
 Records of the Australian Museum
64(1): 1–50.
 
2 Records of the Australian Museum (2012) Vol. 64
For the present study almost all available material inAustralian collections was examined and type specimenswere either seen by the authors or examined by experts atthe institutions housing them.Bees of the genus
Trichocolletes
are found only inAustralia in the south-eastern temperate, south-westerntemperate and eremean biomes (as dened by Crisp
et al
.,2004). Information on behaviour is limited. Many species areactive in late winter and spring and the common species of theeast coast have been reported (Hacker, 1918; Rayment, 1929,1935) to show a preference for pea owers, while a morecomprehensive survey of ower visiting records for WesternAustralian species (Houston, 2000) demonstrated that thebees forage from other ower families as well. Members of the genus have been identied as important pollinators of 
 Diuris
orchids (Indsto
et al
., 2006).
Terminology, methods and measurements
The morphological terminology follows that used by Michener(2007) and Harris (1979), including interchangeable use of the words hair and seta. Relative dimensions quoted in thedescriptions were measured using an eye-piece graticule on astereomicroscope with the zoom objective set to give a readingof 50 divisions for the head width. Abbreviations used for themeasurements are as in Houston (1990) and are as follows:as follows:
 AOD
antennocular distance;
 ASD
antennal socketdiameter;
 BMW 
basal width of mandible;
 DMA
distancebetween anterior mandibular articulations;
FL
agellumlength;
 HL
head length;
 HVO
height of vertex above lateralocelli;
 HW 
head width;
 IAD
interantennal distance;
 LID
; lowerinterorbital distance;
 ML
mandible length;
 MOD
diameter of median ocellus;
 MSL
malar space length (shortest distancebetween the abductor swelling and the eye);
OOD
ocelloculardistance;
SL
scape length;
SW 
scape width;
UFW 
upper widthof face;
UID
upper interorbital distance;
WOC 
width of ocellarcluster. Measurement of the length of the hind tarsus excludesthe claws. Metasomal terga are referred to as
T1, T2
etc. andsterna as
S1, S2
etc.
S7 
and
S8
, the “hidden sterna” of males,exhibit useful diagnostic characteristics and were extracted forexamination. Individual antennal agellomeres are referred toby number as
F1, F2
etc.
Figs 1–2.
Trichocolletes venustus
, male: (1) fore basitarsus showing plume (2) hind leg (part) showing long hair on femur.
All but three of the type specimens were examinedby one of us (MB). The exceptions were examined andphotographed by colleagues in the holding institutions onour behalf.Descriptions are arranged alphabetically.To minimize repetition in the specic descriptions, eyesare described as “not hairy”, rather than “with scattered,minute setae”. Many males carry a dense fringe of long,sinuous hair on the posterior margin of the fore basitarsus.When the hairs are longer than twice the width of thebasitarsus, the fringe is called a plume (Fig. 1), otherwiseit is called a brush. The section of the epistomal suture thatseparates the clypeus from the supraclypeal area is calledthe basal suture of the clypeus. The widths of metasomalbands are difcult to measure with any precision, but thereare discernable differences between species. Metasomalbands are described as “narrow” if the width of the bandon T2 is less than
1
 ⁄ 
5
the distance from the gradulus to theapex of the tergum, measured medially, and “wide” whenthe band width is more than ¼ of that distance.Characters of individual species are described onlywhere they differ from the typical condition given in thegeneric description. Unless otherwise noted, the bodylengths of all specimens examined were within ±1 mm of that for the specimen described. Sexes were associated bymorphological similarity and coincident collection, exceptwhere noted otherwise.Geospatial coordinates are GPS readings and distributions include Interim Biogeographical Regions of Australia codes(IBRA, 2010) in parentheses. The following abbreviationsare used for collections in which the specimens are lodged:AM, Australian Museum, Sydney; AMNH, AmericanMuseum of Natural History, New York; ANIC, AustralianNational Insect Collection, Canberra; BMNH, BritishMuseum (Natural History), London; MV, Museum Victoria,Melbourne; OUM, University Museum, Oxford; QM,Queensland Museum (now including the former UQIC,University of Queensland Insect Collection), Brisbane;SAM, South Australian Museum, Adelaide; WAA, WesternAustralian Department of Agriculture Insect ReferenceCollection; WAM, Western Australian Museum, Perth.

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