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07-30-12 Edition

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Published by: San Mateo Daily Journal on Jul 31, 2012
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06/12/2013

 
www.smdailyjournal.comMonday
 July 30,2012
Vol XII,Edition 298
SENATE CONTROL
NATION PAGE 7
 
IRAN URGESBABY BOOM
WORLDPAGE 8
MICHAEL PHELPSWINS 1ST SILVER
SPORTS PAGE 11
DEMOCRATS PUSH HARD TO KEEPSLIMMAJORITY
 Elegant Home Design Since 1952 
650
227
4882FREE ESTIMATE
165 N. Amphlett San Mateo www.rudolphsinteriors.com
By Ashley Hansen
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
If you clean your house,go towork every day or if the nearestvending machine is a favorite hang-out,chances are you’ve met SanMateo’s leading lady. And if youhaven’t been formally introduced,then Victor Hanna hopes you’rewilling to make a new local friend.Her name is Betty Mills and,while she doesn’t exist in the physi-cal sense,she has most likely been apart of your daily life since 2002.“Our mission,what we’ve set outto do,is to build a great Americanbrand,”Hanna said about BettyMills,a TOP 500 e-commerce com-pany and one of the Internet’s lead-ing janitorial and supply businessesheadquartered in San Mateo. “Ourcompany evolved quite a bit alongthe way. Most recently,we’veentered the industrial supply,theoffice snack,over 2,000 organic andall-natural snacks and that’s a verybig leading differentiator of BettyMills. The most recent category ismedical supplies. We’ve now gotover 130,000 products on the site.”Hanna,formerly of the four-per-son startup team that foundedOnsale.com,began Betty Mills fol-lowing the dot-com implosion in atime when no one wanted anythingto do with the technology business.But Hanna and his founding partner,David Schulhof,saw potential inbringing customers a new way topurchase everyday household items.Despite not knowing much aboutSan Mateo,Hanna was drawn to the
Meet Betty Mills
ROSIE LINARES/DAILY JOURNAL
Victor Hanna,founding partner of San Mateo-based Betty Mills,startedthe business in 2002 after the dot-com bust.Now,it’s one of the leadingsupply businesses on the Internet.
Building ‘a great American brand’in San Mateo
See
MILLS
,Page
19
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
After hearing directly fromBridgepointe Shopping Center offi-cials last week that the Ice Center of San Mateo will not have its leaserenewed when it expires next year,agroup of hockey moms and othersupporters of the rink have vowed tofight its demise.Peter Meier,with SPI Holdings,told a packed house at theHarbortown Clubhouse Thursdaynight that Bridgepointe will not wel-come back the ice rink next year andis instead asking the city to allow itto offer a recreational amenity off site.When the old Fashion Island wastorn down,city officials mandatedthat the ice rink or a similar recre-ational amenity remain on the prop-erty under a master plan.Thirteen years late,SPI is lookingto maximize its profits from the cen-ter by replacing the ice rink withseveral retailers by amending its
Ice centersupportersplan fight
By Brendan Bartholomew 
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Pacifica residents and officials aregrappling with questions and con-troversy as they decide whether toalleviate traffic congestion bywidening Highway 1 from SharpPark through Rockaway Beach.Pacifica has been consideringsuch a project for more than years,but was forced to take a tentativestep forward in late June when thecity’s staff received a letter from
Pacifica officials splitover Highway 1 plans
See
ICE
,Page
20
See
SPLIT
,Page
19
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Tucked in a parking garage indowntown San Mateo,a mural withtwo musicians in mid-note greetsthose who seek it and those whohappen upon it.It is the work of Dylan Hararah,a23-year-old native of San Mateo’sShoreview neighborhood,who isslowly finding ways to bring hiswork to life in San Mateo throughmurals and other pieces of art.Hararah believes looking at art isan experience,one that gives peoplea break from the advertisementswith which our society is inundated.Yet in the course of our daily lives,it’s a rarity to view art outside of museums or gallery exhibitions.Hararah’s murals give the public anartistic respite from everyday life.“Public art gives people a break,Ithink,from a world of monetaryvalue”said Hararah.The B Street and Vine café indowntown San Mateo commis-sioned Hararah to paint “Jazz Duet.”The mural,finished several yearsago,is on the restaurant’s back wall
Bringing walls to life
ROSIE LINARES/DAILY JOURNAL
San Mateo artist Dylan Hararah stands in front of the mural in the Central Parking Garage in downtown SanMateo he painted.The artist has also been commissioned to repaint the murals outside the Swingin’Door pubon 25th Avenue.
 
San Mateo muralist enlivens the city through art
See
ART
,Page
20
 
FOR THE RECORD2
Monday
 July 30,2012
 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St.,Suite 210,San Mateo,CA 94402
Publisher:Jerry LeeEditor in Chief:Jon Mays
 jerry@smdailyjournal.comjon@smdailyjournal.comsmdailyjournal.comscribd.com/smdailyjournaltwitter.com/smdailyjournalfacebook.com/smdailyjournalPhone:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax:(650) 344-5290To Advertise:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ads@smdailyjournal.comEvents:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . calendar@smdailyjournal.comNews:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . news@smdailyjournal.comDelivery:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . circulation@smdailyjournal.comCareer:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . info@smdailyjournal.com
As a public service,the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 250 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries,emailinformation along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style,clarity,length and grammar.If you would like to have an obituary printedmore than once,longer than 250 words or without editing,please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Law professorAnita Hill is 56.
This Day in HistoryThought for the Day
1956
President Dwight D. Eisenhower signeda measure making “In God We Trust”the national motto,replacing “EPluribus Unum”(“Out of many,one”).
“The fellow who says he’ll meet  you halfway usually thinks hesstanding on the dividing line.” 
— O.A.Battista,Canadian-born author-scientist.
Musician is BuddyGuy is 76.Actress Vivica A.Fox is 48.
In other news ...Birthdays
REUTERS
China’s Jingbiao Wu competes on the men’s 56Kg Group A weightlifting competition at the London 2012 Olympic GamesSunday.
Monday:
Mostly cloudy in the morningthen becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog inthe morning. Highs in the 60s. West winds5 to 15 mph.
Monday night:
Partly cloudy in theevening then becoming mostly cloudy.Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in thelower 50s. West winds 5 to 15 mph.
Tuesday:
Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs inthe 60s. West winds 10 to 15 mph.
Tuesday night:
Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight.Lows in the lower 50s. West winds 5 to 15 mph.
Wednesday:
Partly cloudy in the morning then becomingsunny. Patchy fog. Highs in the 60s.
Wednesday night through Thursday night:
Partly cloudy.Patchy fog. Lows in the lower 50s. Highs in the 60s.
Local Weather ForecastLotto
 The Daily Derby race winners are No.09 Win-ning Spirit in first place;No.8 Gorgeous Georgein second place;and No.03 Hot Shot in thirdplace.The race time was clocked at 1:45.64.
(Answers tomorrow)GROOM THINK EFFORTMASCOTSaturday’sJumbles:Answer:After three bull’s-eyes in a row, his goal of winningan Olympic gold medal was this — ON TARGETNow arrange the circled lettersto form the surprise answer, assuggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,one letter to each square,to form four ordinary words.
NIHYSAWERFCLUNKOUNBEOC
©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
   F   i  n   d  u  s  o  n   F  a  c  e   b  o  o   k   h   t   t  p  :   /   /  w  w  w .   f  a  c  e   b  o  o   k .  c  o  m   /   j  u  m   b   l  e
A:
4 4 42 3 4 84326
Meganumber
 J
 
uly 27 Me
 
ga Mill
 
i
 
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n
 
s
 
18 23 24 32 34
F
 
antasy Fi
 
v
 
e
 
Dail
 
y t
 
hre
 
e mi
 
dd
 
ay
 
229 9
Dail
 
y Fo
 
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8 7 2
Dail
 
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hre
 
e ev
 
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ng
 
In 1942
,President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed a bill creatinga women’s auxiliary agency in the Navy known as “WomenAccepted for Volunteer Emergency Service”— WAVES forshort.
In 1619
,the first representative assembly in America convenedin Jamestown in the Virginia Colony.
In 1864
,during the Civil War,Union forces tried to takePetersburg,Va.,by exploding a gunpowder-filled mine underConfederate defense lines; the attack failed.
In 1918
,poet Joyce Kilmer,a sergeant in the 165th U.S.Infantry Regiment,was killed during the Second Battle of theMarne in World War I. (Kilmer is perhaps best remembered forhis poem “Trees.”)
In 1932
,the Summer Olympic Games opened in Los Angeles.
In 1945
,the Portland class heavy cruiser USS Indianapolis wastorpedoed by a Japanese submarine during World War II; only316 out of some 1,200 men survived.
In 1962
,the Trans-Canada Highway was officially opened atRogers Pass in British Columbia.
In 1965
,President Lyndon B. Johnson signed into law theMedicare bill,which went into effect the following year.
In 1975
,former Teamsters union president Jimmy Hoffa dis-appeared in suburban Detroit; although presumed dead,hisremains have never been found.
In 1980
,Israel’s Knesset passed a law reaffirming all of Jerusalem as the capital of the Jewish state.
Ten years ago:
President George W. Bush signed into law themost far-reaching government crackdown on business fraudsince the Depression.Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig is 78. Moviedirector Peter Bogdanovich is 73. Feminist activist Eleanor Smealis 73. Singer Paul Anka is 71. Jazz musician David Sanborn is 67.Former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is 65. ActorWilliam Atherton is 65. Blues singer-musician Otis Taylor is 64.Actor Frank Stallone is 62. Actress Delta Burke is 56. Singer-songwriter Kate Bush is 54. Country singer Neal McCoy is 54.Movie director Richard Linklater is 52. Actor Laurence Fishburneis 51. Actress Lisa Kudrow is 49. Actor Terry Crews is 44. Moviedirector Christopher Nolan (“The Dark Night”) is 42. Actor TomGreen is 41. Rock musician Brad Hargreaves (Third Eye Blind) is41. Actress Christine Taylor is 41. Actress Hilary Swank is 38.Olympic gold medal beach volleyball player Misty May-Treanoris 35. Actress Jaime Pressly is 35. Actress April Bowlby is 32.Actress Yvonne Strahovski (TV:“Chuck”) is 30.
Olympic viewing:NBCcritics loud on social media
NEW YORK — In the age of socialmedia,NBC now has millions of televi-sion critics who make their opinionsknown about every aspect of Olympicscoverage instantly.They’ve even set up their own hashtagon Twitter:(hash)nbcfail. The onlinecomplaints focused Saturday on NBC’sdecision to air the marquee swimmingevent won by American Ryan Lochte ontape delay in prime time,and Friday onthe network not streaming the openingceremony online. Sunday’s critics start-ed early:people wondering why the U.S.men’s basketball team’s opening gameaired on a cable network while women’scycling was shown on NBC.The conversation is so active thatNBC’s executive producer of the games,Jim Bell,took to Twitter to answer crit-ics and even change the way NBC isdoing something in response.“(hash)nbcfail is filled with a lot of crying and snark and humor,but NBCcan actually learn something from it,”said Jeff Jarvis,a media critic whowrites the Buzzmachine.com blog.Complaints about tape delayed cover-age are an evergreen with Olympics heldon foreign soil. But the London Gamesare the first with Twitter,Facebook andother social media sites in full flower,ina mobile phone era where people carrycomputers that instantly deliver news intheir pockets. It has amplified the impa-tience of viewers who want to see eventson their large-screen TVs instantly andhaven’t been mollified by NBC’s deci-sion to stream the events live online.James Poniewozik,Time magazineTV critic,tweeted that “NBC tape delaycoverage is like the airlines:its interestis in giving you the least satisfactoryservice you will still come back for.”That drew a quick response fromNBC’s Bell:“You do know that allsports events are being streamed liveright?”“I do,indeed!”replied Poniewozik.“Have enjoyed it. Apparently a lot of folks still prefer watching it on TV.”NBC says it saves big events forprime-time airing because that is whenmost viewers are available to watchthem and where the network makes thebulk of its advertising revenue. Sinceprime time on the U.S. East Coast coin-cides with 1 a.m. London time,there areno events to air live then. NBC represen-tatives noted that there were 39 hours of live events Sunday on NBC and its affil-iated networks.Jonathan Wald,who produces PiersMorgan’s CNN talk show and used towork at NBC,tweeted that “the medalfor most Olympic whining goes toeveryone who complains about whathappens every four years. Tape delay.”One of those complainers,in fact,wasMorgan:He tweeted his disdain Fridayfor NBC’s decision not to make theopening ceremony available live.The advent of Twitter makes it seemslike there’s a lot of unhappiness whenthe majority of viewers are watchingNBC on tape delay and appear satisfiedwith it,Wald said in an interview.NBC can point to television ratings justifying their approach. The Nielsencompany said the opening ceremonydrew more than 40 million peopleFriday,the most ever for one of thoseOlympic events. Saturday’s first night of coverage was seen by 28.7 million,another record,beating every other firstnight of Olympic competition. InBeijing four years ago,24 millionwatched on the corresponding night.
14 19 22 36 40 3
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REUTERS
A parachutist dressed as QueenElizabeth is seen during the openingceremony of the London 2012 OlympicGames.
 
I
n the 1950s,the Peninsula was boomingwith construction projects involvingfamily houses. A number of developerssuch as Henry Doelger (Westlake-Daly City),Bohannon in San Mateo,Eichler throughoutthe Peninsula and Conway,as well and manyothers,were making their mark as construc-tion kings in developing farmland throughoutthe Peninsula. The Peninsula was experienc-ing a construction boom. The population of San Mateo County was in the 300,000 areawith many thousands a month moving into thePeninsula.In the early ’50s,Pacifica was still a seriesof isolated communities without much indus-trial base or tax base except from the county.Although spread out along the coast for anumber of miles,it had many sparsely popu-lated,isolated valleys such as Manor,Vallemar,Sharp Park and,the largest,LindaMar,in the San Pedro Valley that had been thehome of Francisco Sanchez. The Ocean ShoreRailroad had attracted a small number of set-tlers when it was built through the valleys andalongside the ocean on its way to Half MoonBay. However,it had failed economically andits only reminders were a few train stationsand acreage that was still owned by the rail-road company. A San Francisco real estatedeveloper,Ray Higgins,had purchased landin the San Pedro Valley,along with the adobebuilt by Francisco Sanchez,from the EdwardKirkpatrick heirs. The future city of Pacificawas still isolated and looking for an identity,however.Andres Oddstad,born in 1919,was anephew of Henry and Ellis Stoneson. Hismother was Stephanie Oddstad of SanFrancisco. He did carpentry work to financecollege at the University of California. Hereceived his civil engineering degree from theuniversity at age 27 and,in 1946,he startedworking carpentry jobs in San Francisco.After marriage,his wife,Clara,bore him twochildren,Sandra in 1946,and David in 1955.He continued constructing houses with finan-cial loans from his uncles,Henry and EllisStoneson (who developed Stonestown in SanFrancisco). He started by building SterlingPark in Colma. Oddstad then acquired proper-ty in South San Francisco and built the fol-lowing additions:Hillside Manor,SterlingTerrace (1949-51) and Sterling Manor (1950— surrounded by Buri Buri Addition). Manymore houses were built down the Peninsula.In the 1950s,Oddstad bought the San PedroValley land (Pacifica) from Ray Higgins. Henow had a vision of building thousands of moderately priced houses for the people whodesired to live in future Pacifica. The once-thriving artichoke fields were bulldozed forconstruction of roads,shopping centers,churches,gas stations and schools. The proj-ect was called the San Pedro-Linda MarSterling home project. He then moved to thewest of Junipero Serra in San Bruno and start-ed construction on the Rollingwood addition just west of the Golden Gate Cemetery. In1955,the valleys along the coast were stillunincorporated and there and there was talk of incorporation. It was at this time that a move-ment to annex Linda Mar and other propertiesinto the city of San Bruno began. When thecitizens of the San Bruno got wind of thismovement,they went berserk. The city of SanBruno and the unincorporated area of Pacificawere isolated from each other by the CoastRange that was approximately 600 to 700 feethigh. San Bruno was in the throes of a greatdeal of construction and its city governmentwas having trouble coping with this. To ade-quately administer the coast communities,thecity had to supply infrastructure such as waterand sewer. At this time,the community of SanBruno did not want to acquire theseheadaches,and the concept of incorporationof these properties was soundly defeated.Oddstad’s next challenge was in PortolaHighlands in San Bruno,west of SkylineBoulevard. The community that was tobecome Portola Highlands had been part of the Sneath Dairy and it had a steep hill and avalley where they had to construct around acreek. The creek was covered over and cul-
Andres Oddstad,house builder
3
Monday
 July 30,2012
 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
BELMONT
Theft.
Someone stole multiple packs of beerfrom the Safeway supermarket on El CaminoReal before 7:40 p.m. Sunday,July 15.
Driving under the influence.
Someone wasdriving recklessly and arrested for drivingunder the influence at Ralston Avenue andHighway 92 before 7:15 p.m. Sunday,July 15.
Hit and run.
Someone reported their car hadbeen hit by their neighbor’s car on Old CountyRoad before 5:36 p.m. Sunday,July 15.
Theft.
Items were stolen out of a yard on VillaAvenue before 11:49 a.m. Sunday,July 15.
Vandalism.
Someone broke a sign on RalstonAvenue before 8:30 a.m. Tuesday,July 24.
FOSTER CITY 
Vandalism.
A person’s vehicle was keyed onMarquette Lane before 10:12 a.m. onWednesday,July 25.
Fireworks.
Someone reported hearing fire-works on Pilgrim Drive before 12:30 a.m. onTuesday,July 17.
Residential burglary.
Someone reportedtools valued at $160 missing from his garageover the past two months on Eliza Courtbefore 1:13 p.m. Monday,July 16.
Embezzlement.
A former employee turned in$57,000 worth of fraudulent expense receiptssince 2008 at Electronics for Imaging,Inc. onVelocity Way before 10:22 a.m. Monday,July16.
Police reports
My taxi!
Someone was arrested for battery in afight between two people in a taxi atBalboa Avenue and Carmelita Avenue inBurlingame before 1:54 a.m. Saturday,July 21.
 
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE COLMA HISTORY  MUSEUM
1950s ad in Colma newspaper.
See
HISTORY
,Page
19

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