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Who Are New Afrikan Political Prisoners and Prisoners of War

Who Are New Afrikan Political Prisoners and Prisoners of War

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Published by Rbg Street Scholar
Political Prisoners and Prisoners of War are not in prison for committing social"crimes", nor are they criminals. Different PP/POWs participated in progressive and revolutionary movements in varying levels. Some in educational and community organizing, others in clandestine armed and offensive people's armies. All are as a result of conscious political action, for building resistance, building and leading movements and revolution... for making change. Many of us in some way or another are part of these very movements, part of that resistance that PP/POWs helped to build. As people continuing to struggle for change, we are obligated and it is our duty to support those people who are in prison as a result of struggling for our liberation.Significant events in the New Afrikan Nation’s struggle for justice and liberation have occurred in August. The commemoration of Black August particularly hails the advances and sacrifices of Black Freedom Fighters. Please join me in learning about the History of the Black August Concept and Program. And, most importantly, join us in supporting Our Political Prisoners and Prisoners of War. Send our brothers and Sisters some love and light.
See Contact list/ mailing information at ABCF http://www.abcf.net/abcf.asp?page=prisoners
Political Prisoners and Prisoners of War are not in prison for committing social"crimes", nor are they criminals. Different PP/POWs participated in progressive and revolutionary movements in varying levels. Some in educational and community organizing, others in clandestine armed and offensive people's armies. All are as a result of conscious political action, for building resistance, building and leading movements and revolution... for making change. Many of us in some way or another are part of these very movements, part of that resistance that PP/POWs helped to build. As people continuing to struggle for change, we are obligated and it is our duty to support those people who are in prison as a result of struggling for our liberation.Significant events in the New Afrikan Nation’s struggle for justice and liberation have occurred in August. The commemoration of Black August particularly hails the advances and sacrifices of Black Freedom Fighters. Please join me in learning about the History of the Black August Concept and Program. And, most importantly, join us in supporting Our Political Prisoners and Prisoners of War. Send our brothers and Sisters some love and light.
See Contact list/ mailing information at ABCF http://www.abcf.net/abcf.asp?page=prisoners

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Published by: Rbg Street Scholar on Aug 03, 2012
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Who are New Afrikan Political Prisoners and Prisoners of War?
Who are New Afrikan PoliticalPrisoners and Prisoners of War?
 
Mp3 Downloadsplay Assata Shakur- We Can Win Our Liberationplay Chairman Fred Ham,pton Sr. Speaksplay Mumia Abu-Jamal
On Black Gangstasplay Ruchell Magee
 
RBG New Afrikan IndependenceMovement TV,Featuring Assata Shakur 
s Documentary
 
 
Who are New Afrikan Political Prisoners and Prisoners of War?
Who are Political Prisoners and Prisoners of War:Political Prisoners and Prisoners of War are not in prison for committing social "crimes", nor are they criminals. Different PP/POWs participated in progressive and revolutionarymovements in varying levels. Some in educational and community organizing, others inclandestine armed and offensive people's armies. All are in prison as a result of consciouspolitical action, for building resistance, building and leading movements and revolution... for making change. Many of us in some way or another are part of these very movements, part of that resistance that PP/POWs helped to build. As people continuing to struggle for change, weare obligated and it is our duty to support those people who are in prison as a result of struggling to make change. Though some have a wider definition of Political Prisoners, wemaintain that even if the definition of a Political Prisoner was expanded and widely accepted toinclude social prisoners of conscience, it needs to be clear that those prisoners who went toprison as a result of political action taken on the street would still demand our priority support.For movements to support other prisoners before we support the prisoners who have gone toprison for building the very movements we now participate in is backwards and criminal. From:http://www.abcf.net/index.htmQ: What is the Black Liberation Army (BLA)? A: The year was 1971. The FBI, CIA, and local police department's Counter-IntelligenceProgram planted degenerative seeds to increase tensions and factionalism within the
 
BlackPanther Partyfor Self-Defense (BPP). Their efforts culminated in the split betweenHuey P.Newtonand Eldridge Cleaver. While Newton continued leadership of the broken BPP, Cleaver went on to lead what came to be known as the Black Liberation Army (BLA), which hadpreviously existed as the underground faction and "fighting apparatus" of the BPP. The BLA isnotorious for allegedly waging war against local police department oppressors through policecar bombings.
 
 
Who are New Afrikan Political Prisoners and Prisoners of War?
Q: What are the principles of the Black Liberation Army? A: The BLA, as a result of realizing the economical nature of the system under which we areforced to live, maintains the following principles:1. That we are anti-capitalist, anti-imperialist, anti-racist, and anti-sexist.2. That we must of necessity strive for the abolishment of these systems and for theinstitution of Socialistic relationships in which Black people have total and absolutecontrol over their own destiny as a people.3. That in order to abolish our systems of oppression, we must utilize the science of class struggle, develop this science as it relates to our unique national condition.Q: Where can I find out more about the Black Liberation Army? A:The Talking Drum
Black Militancy: Notes from the Underground
 
Retrieved from Bad Subjects: Issue #71, December 2004Text written by Rashad ShabazzIf one were to examine, closely, the hegemonic discourses of black American history, onewould be surprised to find a long history of militant armed struggle. Slave rebellions, urban"guerilla" insurgencies, rural defense leagues, are all part of a tapestry of black militantrebellion to subjugation. The most recent icon of black armed struggle, the Black Panther Party, is a linchpin in understanding the development of this phenomenon in the late 1960s,which saw its high point in the 1970s. But it was not the only organization that used or openingadvocated the use of force against the state. Others did exist. They did not exist in the publicor "aboveground" as the Panthers did between the years of 1966 and 1974. Other factions of the organization existed outside the public eye
clandestinely. Not coincidently, this historyexists clandestinely. Clandestine is also a fitting way to describe some of the writers of this
history. It is fitting because they, like the histories of armed struggle in U.S., don’t exist in the
open, but they exist nonetheless.Many of those who (clandestinely) trace the historical trajectories of armed struggle are (or were) prisoners of the state. Assata Shakur, George Jackson, Kuwasi Balagoon, andGeronimo Ji Jaga Pratt, all participated in armed struggle. Branded by the state as criminals,underground black radicals, as well as white underground radicals were part of a network of militant "paramilitary" insurgencies. By several accounts this movement lasted from the late
1960’s until the beginning of the 1980’s. Today, imprisone
d underground activists continue towrite of this subjugated history from the cells that hold them.

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