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First and Second Chronicles Outline Studies

First and Second Chronicles Outline Studies

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE

The Books of the Kings give us the general and
public history of the government of Israel; its glory
in the reigns of David and Solomon; its fall, and
the causes which led to it.

The Books of Chronicles, while traversing sub-
stantially the same ground, have another purpose, a
well-defined aim, viz., that of tracing the history of
Judah, and the house of David.

The Books of the Kings give us the general and
public history of the government of Israel; its glory
in the reigns of David and Solomon; its fall, and
the causes which led to it.

The Books of Chronicles, while traversing sub-
stantially the same ground, have another purpose, a
well-defined aim, viz., that of tracing the history of
Judah, and the house of David.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Aug 03, 2012
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FIRST AD SECOD CHROICLES OUTLIE STUDIES
BY JOH A HUTTO, M. AThe Books of the Kings give us the general andpublic history of the government of Israel; its gloryin the reigns of David and Solomon; its fall, andthe causes which led to it.The Books of Chronicles, while traversing sub-stantially the same ground, have another purpose, awell-defined aim, viz., that of tracing the history of Judah, and the house of David. Israel (the king-dom of Samaria) does not enter into these bookssave as its kings come into contact with those of Ju-dah. In Chronicles there seems to be a kind of studied avoidance of any mention of the northernkingdom, and the attention of the reader is heldsteadily to Judah, Jerusalem, the temple and itspriests and services, as if God was now concernedexclusively with these.The key- word is "Election;" the key- verses, IChron. xvii:7, 8, 27; xxviii:5.Chronicles serves well as a title, if we understandit to mean the equivalent of "Acts," or "History.""Things Omitted" (the title of the Sept.) is inaccu-rate. The books are not a supplement to otherbooks of Scripture; they are an independent work,having their own plan and end.I. The time of composition can be approximatelyfixed. The books were written at the close of theBabylonian exile. The genealogy of the house of 
 
114OUTLIE STUDIES.David is carried down to Zerubbabel, if not a littlelower, ^1:17-19. In I Chron. vi:i5 the captivity isspoken of in such a way as to make it evident thatthe author was writing in a time subsequent to thatevent. It is generally believed that Ezra was theauthor. Certainly no man of that time could befound better fitted for the work.2. Contents. These may be conveniently distrib-uted into four groups.I. Genealogical tables, from Adam to the return fromthe exile, I Chron. i-ix. It is important to observethat throughout these long lists of names there istraceable the sovereign choice of God. The linesfollow mainly the track of a blessed generation,a separated race. Thus, beginning with Adam,we have the family of Seth down to oah. Thenafter a brief list of the families of Japheth andof Ham, the family of Shem, whose God is theLord, is taken up and traced to Abraham who becomes, as it were, a fresh stock. His posterity afterthe flesh is first given; then Isaac, the child of promise, a fresh stock, because a child of election,follows, with Jacob and his twelve sons, of whomJudah is the central object of the inspired writer,for he is the royal tribe, from whom the Messiah isto spring; and the family of David is given the pre-eminence in the line of Judah. Two of the sons of Israel are omitted, Dan and Zebulun; no genealogyof them is given. All through it is the sovereignaction of grace in the selection of those who are
 
brought nigh to God that is prominent.II. Davids reign, I Chron. x-xxix:22. After abrief account of Saul, I Chron. 1x135; x David'sthrone is the theme, the kingdom, looked at as or-FIKST AD SECOD CHROICLES. 115dained of God for blessing. And accordingly Da-vid's sufferings and faults are passed over in silence,except that of numbering the people, I Chron. xxi.III. Account of the kingdom under Solomon, I Chron.xxix:28-30; 2 Chron. i-ix. "Then Solomon sat onthe throne of the Lord as king, instead of David, hisfather, and prospered" a remarkable expressionnot found elsewhere (cf. I Chron. xxviii:5). Thethrone was God's; and people and king should havesought the realization of the august idea. They didnot, yet the idea is not lost sight of or abandoned,for the Messiah is to fulfill it perfectly. So Davidand Solomon become types in these books of thefuture glory of the true Son and Heir.IV. Account of the kingdom of Judah from the dis-ruption to the captivity, 2 Chron. x-xxxvi.3. Design of First and Second Chronicles. Theirobject is manifold. Some of these purposes maybe pointed out. First, God's dispensational ways.Obviously, with the opening of Chronicles a newera begins. Through all the preceding books wehave the record of God's ways with His chosenpeople, the seed of Abraham. The record is carriedforward through the second Book of Kings, whenit is broken off, no less in sorrow than in anger.With Chronicles the sacred writer goes back to thebeginning and starts again with Adam, Seth, etc.,

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