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google China Internet Censorship

google China Internet Censorship

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Published by Bankim Pandey
Google china censorship
Google china censorship

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Published by: Bankim Pandey on Aug 06, 2012
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03/18/2013

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Executive summary
W
e
cannot imagine our life without internet, it become internal part of our life. Some
researcher considered internet to be the greatest innovation of modern’s time. Suppose the
facility of internet given to us taken by someone forcibly, then imagine our life without it.In recent development china and iran have restricted the information flow throughout theircountry, specially china have ban Google-universal search engine and email in its country.Firstly question arises why any country will ban if internet is so useful. There lots of hiddenagenda of the govt that has to be protected, if there is free flow of information is there publicstart questioning on the procedures of govt work.Internet censorship in China is among the most stringent in the world. The governmentblocks Web sites that discuss the Dalai Lama, the 1989 crackdown on Tiananmen Squareprotesters, Falun Gong, the banned spiritual movement, and other Internet sites
The government’s computers intercept incoming data and compare it against an
ever-changing list of banned keywords or Web sites, screening out even more information. Themotive is often obvious: Since late 2010, the censors have prevented Google searches of the
English word ―freedom.‖
 In March 2011, Google accused the Chinese government of disrupting its Gmail service inthe country and making it appear as if technical problems at Google
 — 
not governmentintervention
 — 
were to blame. At the same time, several popular virtual private-network 
services, or V.P.N.’s, designed to evade the government’s computerized censors, have beencrippled. V.P.N.’s are popular with China’s huge expatriate community and Chinese
entrepreneurs, researchers and scholars who expect to use the Internet freelyFew analysts believe that the government will loosen controls any time soon, with events itconsiders politically sensitive swamping the calendar, including a turnover in the Communist
Party’s top leadership in 2012.
 As revolts began to ricochet through the Middle East and North Africa in 2011, and home-grown efforts to organize protests began to circulate on the Internet, the Chinese governmenttightened its grip on electronic communications, and appeared to be more determined thanever to police cell phone calls, electronic messages, e-mail and access to the Internet in orderto smother any hint of antigovernment sentiment.In the situation where govt is against any particular organisation it is very difficult to survive,but our study show that Google should keep patience and continue to work because due toevolving technology government will not able to control internet censorship for long. Peoplein country is also demanding more freedom, more or less china is the biggest emergingmarket for internet user how any company can lose this potentially rich market.
 
KEY ISSUE IN CHINA- GOOGLE CONTROVERSY
 
 
NEWS ABOUT REVOLTS AGAINST GOVERNMENT ESPECIALLI INAFRICA,ARAB&LIBIYA-Government of china want to suppress the news related torevolt against government in different parts of world because they fear that may affectthe people to demand for more freedom which cause harm to strict govt control inchina
 
NEWS RELATED TO FREEDOM OF TIBET- Government of china want it controlover china and want to suppress any freedom movement there, it also want rest of world to be unaware
what’s
going in Tibet.
 
NEWS RELATED TO HUMAN RIGHTS- Government of china want to showinternationally that human rights condition is very good in country, but if there is freeflow of information in country then world will know about strict restrictions.
 
HEALTH RUMOURS OF PARTY CHIEF MR JIANG WHO RETIRED AT THEAGE 84-
 
Not surprisingly, the stepped-up effort to silence speculation about the wellbeing of Mr. Jiang, 84, who officially retired as party chief in 2002 and as president in2003, has generated even more rumours after he failed to attend the 90th anniversarygala commemorating the birth of the Chinese Communist Party. On morning, theofficial Xinhua News Agency issued an English-language response to the reports that
Mr. Jiang had died, saying they were ―pure rumo
u
r‖ and quoting what it said were―authoritative sources.‖ Later in the day, during a regularly scheduled news
conference, a Foreign Ministry spokesman declined to answer any questions about
Mr. Jiang’s health, referring journalists to the Xinhua statement. That exchange,
however, was curiously omitted from a transcript of the news conference posted on
the ministry’s website.
 
 
BANNING WESTERN WEBSITES WHICH POPULARIZE DEMOCRACY-websites such as BBC and NEW YORK TIMES which imparts effect in popularizingthe democracy in china has to be under strict government control because china is ancommunist country.
 
NEWS ABOUT DALAI LAMA-The main leader of Tibetan movement is DalaiLama. Chinese agency do not any news regarding dalai lama reaches to the peoples
of Tibet. Tibetan people’s have huge sentiment for Dalai Lama. Many Buddhist
monks have set their body in fire in support of freedom and Dalai Lama. This createsa huge pressure on china from world community to liberalize its policy on the Tibetissue.
 
.
Google and China: The Beginnings
• September 2000: Google introduces a Chinese version of its search engine at the
Google.com domain.
• September 2002: Access to Google's site is completely bloc
ked in China for about twoweeks. It appears the domain name was hijacked and redirected -- a move the Chinesegovernment may have been behind. Soon thereafter, signs of restricted access and censoredresults begin to surface. Even the brainiest who got all of Google's famously impossibleinterview questions right can't quite figure out what's going on.
Google and China: The Censorship Begins
• January 2006: Google relents and launches Google.cn, a specialized version of its search
site that filters out pornographic and "politically sensitive" results. The companyacknowledges that the filtering "clearly compromises [its] mission," but notes that "failing tooffer Google search at all to a fifth of the world's population ... [would do so] far moreseverely."
• March 2008: China blocks access to YouTube and Google News during riots in Tibet. It
isn't the first time China has blocked access to specific Google services, and it won't be thelast.
• March 2009: Fast
-forward one year, and YouTube gets the boot in China again. A Chineseofficial denies his nation is afraid of the Internet; a wisecracking writer suspects the JonasBrothers are really to blame. This ban, by most accounts, is still pretty much in place today.
Google and China: The Tensions Climb
 
• J
une 2009: China finds some pornographic results in the Google.cn site and goes ballistic.(Those guys evidently never read this study about why porn is actually good for society.) Thecountry blocks access to Google until the G-team wipes out every mention of the G-spot.
• September 2009: The guy who ran the Google China operation since its inception steps
down from his role. Analysts speculate that his departure might be a sign of broader problemsbetween Google and the People's Republic. Around the same time, satirists speculate thatApple is working with the Chinese government to form its own repressive business strategies.
Google and China: Spiralling Out of Control
• January 12, 2010: Google announces that it will no longer censor search results in Chin
afollowing an attack on its servers in the country. The attack, Google says, targeted the Gmailaccounts of Chinese human rights activists. "These attacks and the surveillance they haveuncovered ... have led us to conclude that we should review the feasibility of our businessoperations in China," Google explains in a blog posting. "We have decided we are no longer

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