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DAILY 08.09.12

DAILY 08.09.12

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Print edition of The Stanford Daily, published August 9, 2012
Print edition of The Stanford Daily, published August 9, 2012

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 An Independent Publication
THURSDAYVolume 242
 August 9, 2012Issue 6
SUMMER WEEKLY EDITION
Opinions 5
 If Egyptians have access to healthy food at cheap prices, why shouldn’t Americans?
Sports 7
Cardinal women’s soccer begins the long road to defend their national championship
Intermission12
The Bay Area takes on the Midwest at Chicago’sthree-day music festival, Lollapalooza
 
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STUDENT LIFE
Notes from abroad: exploring India
By ANNA SCHICKELE
Although I have learned many things whileinterning abroad in India this summer, one of the most unique — and important, in my opin-ion — is the ability to discern between differ-ent types of stares.There’s the standard double take; I get thatfrom everyone in Chennai, the city in whichI’m working. There’s also the way auto-rick-shaw drivers widen their eyes when they catchsight of a moneymaking opportunity, the dis-approving glares from older women and the I- just-spotted-a-Western-sex-goddess oglesfrom young men.Chennai, in the state of Tamil Nadu, is oneof India’s most conservative and least touristycities. It’s got the heat of the tropics and theworld’s second longest beach a strangeboast, but Chennai is proud of its garbage-lined coastline. However, even if they clean upthe beach, the 60 percent alcohol tax and early-to-bed bars (most close at 11 p.m.) are going toprevent this city from becoming a spring breakdestination. The city is sometimes described asIndia’s Detroit, as it’s an auto-manufacturinghub. Everyone is here because it’s where the jobs are, not because they like the city.The same goes for me. I’m an intern for theInstitute for Financial Management and Re-search, a company that runs rural financial insti-tutions. I make 300 rupees a day, which is aboutsix dollars. Food is cheap, the company is alsopaying for housing and Stanford bought myplane ticket, so it really isn’t as much of a terri-ble economic situation as it seems.The three other American interns (twofrom Stanford, one from Dartmouth) and Ispend our workdays on the 10th floor of an air-conditioned office building. But to get to thatoffice building, we walk along a refuse-filledcanal and cross four directions of traffic toreach the company shuttle. The distance cov-ered is fairly small, but the walk can take any-where from five to 20 minutes, depending onthe level of aggression in your street-crossingtechnique.The sights, sounds and smells of the streetare overwhelming: passengers hanging out of buses, beggars curled up and fast asleep, thestench of human excrement, honking cars andmotorbikes and trash everywhere. Thoughthey are rarer, there are pleasant sensations inthe streets as well: the smell of 
sambar 
(spicylentil stew served with every meal), windowsfull of Indian sweets, the scent of the jasmineflowers in women’s hair and the semi-silencethat fills the streets before 7 a.m. or after 9 p.m.To Chennai’s credit, it’s the safest place I’vevisited in the developing world. There’s therisk of getting hit by a motorcycle, but I don’tfeel as if someone is looking for the opportuni-ty to seize my purse. I walked home with an-other female intern at 10 p.m. a few nights ago,and though three different people stopped usto tell us it was unsafe to be out so late, the factthat they seemed so legitimately concerned forour safety was reassuring.But no matter what I do — wear
kurtis 
(long tunics) instead of Western clothes,straighten my curly hair, learn a few words of Tamil — I will attract gapes and stares. And inthis country there are enough surprising,amusing and cringe-inducing scenes to makeme forget my manners and stare back at them.
Contact Anna Schickele at annabs1@ stanford.edu.
STUDENT LIFE
Escondido Village residents postpone chemical spray
Courtesy of Ramin Rahimian
Stanford students are making an impact abroad over the summer, some even as far awayas India. Working in “India’s Detroit,” Schickele recounts her experiences this summer.
By EDWARD NGAI
NEWS EDITOR
A group of Escondido Village (EV) res-idents have successfully delayed the pro-posed treatment of EV family courtyardlawns with herbicides. The plan, whichwould have seen the grass in all seven fami-ly courtyards sprayed with weed-killertoday, is now postponed indefinitely.The family courtyards, home to around250 families, underwent a renovation fi-nanced by John Arrillaga three and a half years ago, when all the existing grass wasdug up and replaced. According to an emailsent to family courtyard subletters, the her-bicide spray was necessary to “maintain thedonor’s gift.”However, Stanford Housing is adamantthat Arrillaga was never involved in the de-cision to treat the family courtyards withherbicides.“John Arrillaga has nothing to do withthis,” said Michael VanFossen, senior asso-ciate director of graduate housing. “Colony[Housing’s landscaping contractor]brought the weeds to our attention, saying,‘We have done the best we can over the lastthree or four years not introducing chemi-cals, but [the weeds] are really gettingbad.’”Since the renovation, landscaping staff have been weeding the family courtyards byhand. However, the crabgrass and cloverhad grown to the point where Colony feltthey no longer were fulfilling their land-scaping contract with the University, whichrequires them to perform “high-qualitygrounds/landscape maintenance.” BothColony and Housing had agreed that herbi-cidal treatment was the best way to satisfytheir agreement.The herbicides proposed for use in thefamily courtyards are SpeedZone and Tur-flon, whose material safety data sheets cat-egorize them as hazardous to health wheninhaled. To prevent this, Housing request-ed that family courtyard residents stay in-doors and seal their windows for 48 hourswhile the chemicals dry.“I thought it was a ludicrous idea,” saidNitzan Waisberg, a professor at the designschool and family courtyard resident. “It’smid-August, hot, and expecting people tokeep their windows and doors shut in apart-ments that don’t have air conditioning orproper ventilation except for windows . . . itwas not a practical idea.”Additionally, many EV residents in thesummer are subletters and did not receivethe email notifying them of the spray andthe necessary precautions to protect them-selves and their families from the toxic ef-fects.“I was going to flier the entire neighbor-hood to ensure everyone [knows about thespray],” VanFossen said. “We only knowwho the [original] subletters are.”Many residents, however, were not con-vinced Housing was doing enough to con-sider the potential adverse effects of theherbicide. At a hastily-convened town halllast week, several families expressed a lackof confidence that the fliers would be ade-quate and were concerned about the long-lasting health effects of the chemicals.VanFossen, insisted, however, that theherbicides were safe.
Please see
SPRAY
, page 4
 
By ANNA QIN
DAILY INTERN
“Just because you are smartand deeply knowledgeable aboutsomething does not mean you willbe an excellent teacher,” saidKirstin Milks Ph.D. ’09 M.A. ’10.Milks, a current high school sci-ence teacher at Bloomington HighSchool South in Bloomington,Ind., is a former student of theStanford Teacher Education Pro-gram (STEP). After completingher doctorate in biochemistry,Milks looked into teaching as ameans of bringing together herlove of collaborative learning andscience. She decided to enroll withSTEP to explore these combinedinterests.“I knew I wanted the time andresources to develop integratedunderstandings of teaching, learn-ing, students and science,” she saidof choosing the program.STEP, established in 1959, is anintensive, yearlong masters pro-gram at the Stanford UniversitySchool of Education (SUSE) thatoffers teaching credentials for as-piring K-12 teachers like Milks.“We are preparing elementaryand secondary teachers, and weare preparing them to do their bestto serve students, their familiesand the communities in which theylive,” said Rachel Lotan M.A. ’81’83 Ph.D. ’85, director of STEP.The overarching program in-cludes STEP Elementary andSTEP Secondary the elemen-tary program for aspiring teachersinterested in educating multiple-subject classes in elementaryschools and the secondary pro-gram for teachers interested in in-structing single-subject classes inhigh school.Classes are taught based on re-search and techniques developedby SUSE, which investigates areassuch as the use of technology inteaching and how society con-tributes to what kids do in schools.“We use state-of-the-art theo-ries and findings to support thework that we do,” Lotan said. “Wewant to prepare the teacher candi-dates to support their students inlearning.”Admission to the program ishighly selective, and STEP looksfor a pool of diverse candidateswho have experience with youthand strong academic backgrounds,not exclusively Stanford gradu-ates.In addition, Ira Lit ’90 M.A. ’91Ph.D. ’03, assistant professor of teaching at STEP, says that 50 per-cent of the program’s admits arestudents of color, and a large num-ber of them are first-generationcollege admits in their families.“We welcome and are excitedby a diverse pool of applicants of all cultures, races, religions andethnic origins, with wide-ranginginterests and experiences,” he said.However, the most importantcharacteristic for any prospectiveSTEP student is, without a doubt, agenuine love for teaching. ForSTEP professor Maren Aukerman,educating youth should be anyprospective student’s main prioritywhen considering the program.“[You] really [need to] thinkabout what is exciting to you aboutengaging with kids and reallymake it about kids rather thanabout you,” she said. “I think thatif the focus is really on what kidsare doing and what kids are able todo, and if that gets you excited,STEP’s the place for you.”For Lotan, this dedication andfocus is also what makes STEP stu-dents and, eventually, STEPteachers — stand out.“[The students] are an incredi-ble group of people who can doanything they want to do, and theychoose to become teachers,” shesaid. “Basically, they choose theprofession that makes all the otherprofessions possible.”In STEP classrooms, not onlydo students learn about current re-search and education techniques,but a large emphasis is also put onhaving students reflect concretelyon their practice and the teachingtechniques that they have devel-oped.“We have students videotapethemselves, generate transcriptsand analyze [their work],” Auker-man said. “There is an emphasis onlooking at what the students them-selves are doing in the classroomand trying to make sense of it toimprove instruction.”Furthermore, Aukerman seesthe attention that the program putsinto educating its students andpreparing them for their futures inthe classroom as the largest con-tributing factor to her success and
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B
OARD OF
D
IRECTORS
Billy Gallagher
President and Editor in Chief 
Margaret Rawson
Business Manager and Chief Operating Officer 
Caroline Caselli
Vice President of Sales
Dan AshtonTheodore GlasserRich JaroslovskyMichael LondgrenBob MichitarianBrendan O’Byrne
E
DITORIAL STAFF
Billy Gallagher
Editor in Chief 
eic@stanforddaily.com
Joseph Beyda
Summer Managing Editor 
 jbeyda@stanford.edu
Ed Ngai & Molly Vorwerck 
 News Editors
edngai@stanford.edumvorwerc@stanford.edu
George Chen
Sports Editor 
 gchen15@stanford.edu
Andrea Hinton
Intermission Editor 
anhinton@stanford.edu
Mehmet Inonu
Photo Editor 
minonu@stanford.edu
Lorena Rincon-Cruz
Graphics Editor 
lorenar2@stanford.edu
Miles Unterreiner
Opinions Editor 
milesu1@stanford.edu
Matt Olson
Copy Editor 
maolson@stanford.edu
Cover art by
Lorena Rincon-Cruz
Please see
STEP
, page 6
MEHMET INONU/The Stanford Daily
 After the area was covered in tarps and plywood for more than a month, students and visitors can now see the Starbucks opening at Tresid-der in the fall. The world’s largest coffee chain is opening across from Jamba Juice, replacing some of the seating in the student union.
E
XCLUSIVE COFFEE
UNIVERSITY
STEP program pushes the boundaries of education

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