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Times Leader 08-12-2012

Times Leader 08-12-2012

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Published by The Times Leader
The Wilkes-Barre Times Leader 08-12
The Wilkes-Barre Times Leader 08-12

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Published by: The Times Leader on Aug 12, 2012
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02/02/2013

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Medalcount
as of Aug. 11LONDON 2012 OLYMPICS
United States 44 29 29 102China 38 27 22 87Russia 21 25 32 78Britain 28 15 19 62Germany 11 19 14 44Japan 6 14 17 37 Australia 7 16 12 35France 10 11 12 33South Korea 13 7 7 27Italy 8 7 8 23Netherlands 6 6 8 20Ukraine 5 4 9 18Canada 1 5 12 18Hungary 8 4 5 17Spain 3 9 4 16Brazil 3 4 8 15New Zealand 5 3 5 13Iran 4 5 3 12
COUNTRY G S B TOT
BOLTSTRIKES3TIMES
UsainBolt
got the goldmedal and another worldrecord, too, anchoring theJamaicans to victory in36.84 seconds Saturdaynight to cap off his secondstraight 3-for-3 Olympics.The United States finishedin 37.04 seconds, the oldworld-record time set by Boltand the Jamai-cans lastyear.
PAGE1C
DIVINGINTOGOLD
DavidBoudia
ended agold-medal drought for theUnited States with a dramaticlast dive that scored the mostpoints of the10-meter plat-form competition at theOlympics on Saturday night.Boudia’s victory gave theU.S. its first gold in divingsince 2000.
PAGE7C
2012LONDONOLYMPICS
10 A.M., NBC:
Men’s basket-ball, Gold Medal final, Spain vs.U.S.
7 P.M., NBC:
Closing ceremo-ny.
T V S C H E D U L E
T
he
T
imes
L
eader
C M Y K
WILKES-BARRE, PA SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 $1.50
6
09815 10077
timesleader.com
NORFOLK, Va. Republican MittRomney anointed Wisconsin Rep. PaulRyan, an ardent conservative and devot-ed budget cutter, as his vice presidentialrunning mate on Saturday, and the twomen immediately embarked on a tour of campaign battleground states vowing todefeat President Barack Obama and re-pair the long-ailing U.S. economy.Americais“anationfacingdebt,doubtand despair,” and a transformativechange in leadership is vital, Ryan decla-
Romney’s choice is Paul Ryan
AP PHOTO
RepublicanPresidentialcandidate,MittRomney,left,andhisrunningmate,Rep.PaulRyan,R-Wis.,lookatthecrowd.
INSIDE
ANEWS
Local News 3ANation and World 5AObituaries 8A
BPEOPLE
Birthdays 7B
CSPORTS
Outdoors 10CWeather 12C
DBUSINESS
Stocks 3D
EVIEWS
Editorials 3E
FETC.
Puzzles 2-3FBooksl 5F
Ajay Arora and his partners re-centlyboughtatwo-unithomein Wilkes-Barre for $25,000 as rental property investment.He was surprised to learn thecounty’s tax value on the proper-ty was $86,500.“I didn’t know the assessment was that high,” said Arora, whointends to file an assessment ap-peal.Propertyownersstillhavealit-tle over three weeks, or untilSept. 4, to file assessment chal-lenges for 2013. There’s no simple formula tohelppropertyownersdecideifanappeal is warranted, though theassessment more than threetimes the sale price in Arora’scase is an obvious indicator. Toobtainareduction,property ownersmustpresentanappraisalshowing the assessment is toohighormultipleexamplesoflow-er sales or assessments on com-parable structures in the same
Propertyvaluation,sale pricehave gap
Area sale prices dip belowassessed values as deadlinefor challenges nears.
ByJENNIFERLEARN-ANDES 
 jandes@timesleader.com
AverageAssessedvalue$134,768Averagesaleprice$121,962
Luzerne County records show that, for asample of 100 real estate transactionsreviewed, sales prices were an average of9.5 percent below assessed values.
PROPERTY VALUES DROP-9.5%
Mark Guydish/The Times Leader
SeePROPERTY,Page12A
George Bedwick has the hippo-shaped coin banks, statues of saintsand antique wooden phone booth (if  you’re willing to hunt for it).Dominic Fino boasts a wicked spi-ral staircase in the back that leads to a room where you can learn ferrets likethe taste of raspberry and reptilesfavor lemon custard.And Bruce Lefkowitz? Well, he’s gotSugar. The dog, not the sucrose.“I like the dog!” Harry Messersmithquipped with a wry grin when asked why he has stuck with Harrold’s Phar-macy for 45 years, even as the big chains (Walgreen’s, Rite Aid) and big box stores (Walmart, Target) bulldozeinto town and bullhorn deals to makea bargain hunter salivate.And yes, the utterly disarming andhopelessly charming golden lab is a heck of a draw, eager to cozy up toany customer who even absent-mind-edly puts a petting hand withinsnout’s reach.But unless Sugar found the foun-tain of youth buried in Harrold’s backroom, she can’t be the reason thepharmacy threw a big 65th anni- versary bash Saturday.And she most certainly isn’t thereason independent pharmacies con-tinue to survive throughout LuzerneCounty in an era of growing competi-tion from big-budget corporations andshrinking profits from reduced insur-ance reimbursements.No, ask an independent owner or long-time satisfied customer how
In an era of huge chains and mail-order medicine,the area’s independent pharmacies adapt and thrive
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
DominicJr.,DominicSr.andMichaelFinomanthecountersatFino’sPharmacyinDallas.Customerssaytheyareimpressedbythelevelofpersonalservice.
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
BedwickPharmacyinWilkes-BarreoffersitemsformerlysuppliedbytheDiocesanGuildStore.
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Harrold’sPharmacyislocatedonOldRiverRoadinWilkes-Barre.
Prescription for success
ByMARKGUYDISH
 mguydish@timesleader.com
SeePHARMACY,Page6A
U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta said Repub-lican presidential nominee MittRomney made a wise choice desig-nating Paul Ryan as his vice presi-dent.“I know him well,” Barletta saidSaturday from his Hazleton home.Barletta said Ryan, a fellow Repub-lican congressman from Wisconsin, will be “an invaluable resource to theticket and the American people.”
GOP presidential candidate selectsWis. representative as running mate.
SeeCHOICE,Page7A
ByKASIEHUNT 
 Associated Press
Barletta likesrunning mate
ByJENNIFERLEARN-ANDES 
 jandes@timesleader.com
SeeSTATE,Page7A
WHO IS
Paul Ryan?A profile ofthe Wiscon-sin con-gressmanand risingRepublicanstar.
4ADEMO-CRATS
waste notime tear-ing intoRomney’schoice.
4A
M O R EI N S I D E
SAVE$570.85WITHCOUPONSINSIDE
Episodeshotinareatoairsoon.Findoutwhen.ETC.1F
Whenwillthe‘PickerspickKunkle?
 
K
PAGE 2A SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Bala, Benjamin Jr.Costello, ElizabethCzerniakowski,Anna MaeGill, SarahGitman, SaraGregorio, AnthonyLutkoski, HelenMazarki, AnnMronzinski, EdwardTaroli, LibiaZimniski, Josephine
OBITUARIES
Page 8A
PRASHANTSHITUT
President & CEO(570) 970-7158
pshitut@timesleader.com
JOEBUTKIEWICZ
VP/Executive Editor(570) 829-7249
 jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com
DENISESELLERS
VP/Chief Revenue Officer(570) 970-7203
dsellers@timesleader.com
MICHAELPRAZMA
VP/Circulation(570) 970-7202
mprazma@timesleader.com
LISADARIS
VP/HRandAdministration(570) 829-7113
ldaris@timesleader.com
An company
DETAILS
timesleader.com
Newsroom
829-7242jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com
Circulation
 Jim McCabe – 829-5000jmccabe@timesleader.com
Delivery Monday–Sunday $3.60 per weekMailed Subscriptions Monday–Sunday$4.45 per week in PA$4.85 per week outside PAPublished daily by:Impressions Media15 N. Main St.Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711Periodicals postage paid atWilkes-Barre, PA and additional mailing officesPostmaster: Send address changesto Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
+(ISSN No. 0896-4084)USPS 499-710
Issue No. 2012-225
SWEETSOUNDSATPEACHMUSICFEST
JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
G
reg Allman performs at The Peach Music Festival Saturday at the Toyota Pavilion atMontage Mountain. The festival, which started Friday, wraps up today with a special‘Wake Up With Warren’ acoustic performance by Warren Haynes, plus full gospel-fla-vored sets from Robert Randolph & The Family Band and the Blind Boys of Alabama. Aweekend wrap-up review of the festival will be published in Monday’s Times Leader.
PHILADELPHIA — If you’rehungry and it’s late at night, Phi-ladelphia is the place to be.So says Esquire magazine innaming Philly “The Late NightCapital of the United States” inits September issue, which hitsnewsstands Aug.13.For those not familiar with thecity’sculinaryscene,itmaycomeas a surprise that the ubiquitouscheesesteak isn’t included in Es-quire’s summary of Philadel-phia’s finest after-hours eats. Themagazinecheersthecity’s“epicjukeboxesandrandomdart-boards, roasted meat and meltedcheese, super-hard-to-find beersandwhiskeyneat—allservedup without judgment in an Ameri-can stronghold for going big intothe wee hours.”“Anditdoesn’thurtthatthelo-calloveformicrobrewing,dating to the late 1600s, shows up onbeer lists so intricately compiledthey’d be described as curated inmore pretentious cities.Amongthedozenplacesnotedastopsinlate-nightgrubareTheDapperDog,afoodtruckserving grilled hot dogs with toppingslike mashed potato and Greeksalad, on Fridays and Saturdaysfrom9:30p.m.to2:30a.m.;Khyb-er Pass Pub, a hallowed formerrock club that’s now a Southern-influenced tavern with brisketand po’boys on LeidenheimerrollsflownupfromNewOrleans,as well as vegetarian wings and vegan sausage, plus a large array of craft beers to wash it all down;and David’s Mai Lai Wah, a Chi-natown staple that packs in thepost-lastcallcrowdforporkdum-plings and salt-and-pepper squidtill 4 a.m. The Esquire nod comes daysafter Saveur magazine publisheda summary of its 36-hour gastro-nomical tour of the city. Of note were six things the editors said werefoodsthatonlyPhiladelphia has — from Thai coconut gelatoand made-to-order Turkish-spiced doughnuts to Cap’nCrunch fish tacos and house-made burrata cheese.“Throughitalltherewasacon-tinuousthreadofsomethinginef-fably Philly: bright and optimis-tic, entirely unpretentious and yet exacting in quality,” the mag-azine said.
Yo, Philly’s morethan cheesesteak
The city’s abundance oflate-night eats raises it totop of the national menu.
ByJOANNLOVIGLIO
 Associated Press
A glance of the restaurants inPhiladelphia cited as having thebest late-night bites:North Third, 801North 3rd St.Standard Tap, 901North 2nd St.The Dapper Dog, parked at 2ndand Poplar streetsKhyber Pass Pub, 56 South 2nd St.David’s Mai Lai Wah,1001Race St.McGillin’s Olde Ale House,1310Drury St.Good Dog, 224 South15th St.Kennett, 848 South 2nd St.Royal Tavern, 937 East PassyunkAve.Cantina Los Caballitos,1651EastPassyunk Ave.South Philadelphia Tap Room,1509 Mifflin St.Grace Tavern, 2229 Grays FerryAve.The Sidecar Bar & Grille, 2201Christian St.
C H O W D O W N L AT E
PASADENA, Calif. — After a spectacular landing on Mars,the rover Curiosity wasted notime embracing its inner shut-terbug, delighting scientists with vistas of Gale Crater com-plete with sand dunes, moun-tain views and even haze.Now what? The nuclear-powered, six- wheel Curiosity is on a quest tolearn whether the Martian envi-ronment could have been favor-able for microbial life. Before itcan drive, it has to slog through weeks ofhealth checkups.Sinceit’s the most complex spacecrafteversenttotheredplanet,engi-neers want to make sure it’s intip-top shape before they handover the keys to scientists. It al-ready has done a cursory checkof its10 science tools, but moretests are needed. This weekend,its computers get a software up-date — a process that will lastseveral days. When can we watch a movieof the touchdown? The footage is recorded andstored on board Curiosity and will be downloaded as time al-lows. It sent back a low-quality  video and several high-resolu-tion frames that captured thelast few minutes of the descent,providingasenseofaspacecraftlanding on another planet. Inthe video, the protective heatshield pops off and tumblesaway. It ends with billowing plumes of dust as Curiosity wassafely delivered to the surface. Whatarethefirstimpressionsof Gale Crater? The mission’s chief scientistJohn Grotzinger said it was likestaring at California’s MojaveDesert. The landing site is peb-bly with sand dunes nearby andmountains off in the distance. Acurtain of haze hung over thesite. Curiosity’s destination isMount Sharp, a 3-mile-highmountainrisingfromthecenterofthecraterfloorneartheequa-tor. Observations from space re- veal the base of the mountainshows signs of past water — a goodplacetohuntforthechem-ical ingredients of life.How did the last Sunday’slanding go?Curiosity’s performance waspretty much on target with ex-pectations. Because it weighednearly2,000pounds,ithadtobegently lowered to the surface —a routine NASA had never triedbefore. A preliminary recon-struction indicates it landed 11/2 miles downrange from thebull’s-eye.How many rovers are now onMars?Curiosity joins the long-run-ning Opportunity, which hasbeen exploring craters in Mars’southern hemisphere since2004.Opportunity’stwin,Spirit,fell silent in 2010 after getting stuck in a sand trap. Curiosity’sprime mission lasts two years.
AP PHOTO
This image provided by NASA on Thursday shows the first 360-degree color panorama taken onMars by NASA’s Curiosity rover.
Mars Rover facing checkups
More tests and a softwareupdate are vital before thescience mission can begin.
ByALICIACHANG
 AP Science Writer 
AP PHOTO
Doug Ellison, right,of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, discussesthe Mars rover.
ALBANY, N.Y. — New York’sCapitol has been the workplaceof future presidents, SupremeCourt justices, premier thinkersand even scoundrels. Now thestatehouse is telling some of itslong-hidden tales by filling itshallways with artifacts that aredrawing thousands of visitors. Thenewlydisplayedpiecesof Americana include a 1762 slavebill of sale, early abolitionist de-crees, Gov. Nelson Rockefeller’smassively stretched LincolnContinental from the “MadMen”era,andacuriouschunkof old iron: A 3-foot link from Gen.George Washington’s defensesystem, which strung a quarter-mile chain across the HudsonRiver at West Point to stop Brit-ish ships during the Revolution-ary War.In less than a year, marblehalls that for most of their 130 years had been used simply asroutes between offices havebeen transformed into a mu-seum. Every few steps, slices of American and state history giveeven veterans of these hallwayspause.For decades, most of the arti-factswereboxedinawarehousein neighboring Schenectady Countyorstoredinclimate-con-trolled cabinets in the state Ar-chives. But in the last year, NewYork has raided its attic. The artifacts can be seen inregulartoursoftheCapitolor,asthousandsofvisitorsareincreas-ingly doing, by wandering through the working state-house. Detailed signs are aug-mented by audio explanationsthat can be heard by cellphone.
N.Y.’s Capitol turns into history museum
The state highlights itscontributions by movinghistorical pieces into halls.
ByMICHAELGORMLEY 
 Associated Press
HARRISBURG— A $300-mil-lion-a-year state program thathelps school districts pay to con-struct or renovate buildings willsoonbeclosedtonewprojects,atleast temporarily, as state offi-cials decide if it needs to bechanged or eliminated.Some districts are rushing toget their plans into the pipelinebeforetheOctoberstartofanine-month moratorium that wasquietly enacted along with thestatebudgetearlierthissummer.School districts already underfinancial pressure from growing pension obligations and statefundingcutsareeyeingthemora-torium warily, concerned that itcould be the first step towardeventual elimination of the so-called PlanCon reimbursement.PlanCon refers to the Educa-tionDepartment’s“PlanningandConstruction Workbook,” a com-plicated review that runs from justifyingtheneedforaprojecttodesigning it, acquiring the land,building it and paying for it.“We’re really in this incrediblesqueezebecausewe’rejusttrying to get through operational costs,much less construction costs,said Jay Himes, executive direc-tor of the Pennsylvania Associ-ation of School Business Offi-cials. “Without some state sup-port, those building projects aregoing to be more and more andmore difficult.”Republican Gov. Tom Corbettfirstraisedtheideaofamoratori-um when he proposed a 2012-13budget in February, but whateventually passed was scaledback so that it did not take effectuntil October and covered only newprojects,notthosealreadyinthe PlanCon pipeline. The funding for the current year remained level — there areabout 230 projects currently inPlanCon — but the moratoriumis likely to mean that less con-struction and renovation will getunder way in the coming years.“Rightnowit’samoneything,saidSteveMiskin,spokesmanforthe House Republican caucus.“Let’s see what needs to be done— does it need to be improved, whatdoweneedtodoornotdo?”Onepossibilityisthatthefund-ing formula, under which moreaffluentdistrictsgetlesssupport,could be changed.But it’s also possible the entireprogram will be shut down. Cor-bett’s budget materials from Feb-ruaryframedthecomingstudyasa “review of the role of state gov-ernmentinthisareaofschooldis-trict operations.”“It just gives us a breather forthese eight, nine months,” saidEducation Department spokes-manTimEller.“Tolook,A,ifthisis something the state should bedoing,andB,ifanychangesneedto be done.”Districts will still have press-ing needs for construction andrenovation, no matter what thestate does with the PlanCon pro-gram,saidDaveDavare,researchdirector for the Pennsylvania School Boards Association.Somearecurrentlyscramblingtoget in under the Oct. 1 deadline,and recent news accounts havereflected a struggle by some dis-tricts to make plans amid the un-certainty.“We’ve got some districts withsomeveryoldbuildings,”Davaresaid. “Then you also have somedistricts that, if the economturnsaround,couldendupbeing growingdistrictsandaregoingtoneed classroom space.”
Pa. school building aidclosing for evaluation
Districts fear losing a popularprogram that has helped withconstruction, renovation.
ByMARKSCOLFORO
 Associated Press
Daily Number, Midday
Sunday: 8-5-1Monday:1-3-5Tuesday: 7-3-1Wednesday: 6-7-2 (4-6-8,double draw)Thursday: 0-9-1Friday: 8-6-8Saturday: 0-6-6
Big Four, Midday
Sunday: 7-8-9-6Monday: 2-8-3-9Tuesday: 6-8-7-5Wednesday:1-4-4-1Thursday: 4-6-5-1Friday: 0-1-1-2Saturday: 7-4-6-6
Quinto, Midday
Sunday: 6-7-6-9-7Monday: 6-3-0-3-9Tuesday: 0-2-7-7-8Wednesday: 0-8-4-4-6Thursday: 7-3-9-8-6Friday: 7-2-7-9-0Saturday: 4-1-7-5-4
Treasure Hunt
Sunday: 08-10-12-22-28Monday: 04-13-14-26-29Tuesday: 01-16-17-24-25Wednesday:14-16-19-23-24Thursday: 01-04-06-10-24Friday: 04-05-07-11-30Saturday: 01-04-23-29-30
Daily Number, 7 p.m.
Sunday:1-5-0Monday: 3-3-8Tuesday: 3-6-9Wednesday: 4-9-0Thursday: 5-7-9Friday: 0-7-5Saturday: 6-6-7
Big Four, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 7-2-8-7Monday: 6-0-1-9Tuesday: 5-5-5-6Wednesday: 3-6-0-1Thursday: 4-5-4-8Friday: 4-8-2-8Saturday: 7-3-4-9
Quinto, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 9-5-9-6-3Monday: 9-6-2-0-2Tuesday: 2-7-2-8-8Wednesday: 2-7-4-5-4Thursday: 8-4-4-31Friday: 0-2-2-8-8Saturday: 3-5-9-8-9
Cash 5
Sunday: 06-17-37-38-43Monday: 02-11-20-29-33Tuesday:15-17-21-35-39Wednesday: 03-05-31-40-42Thursday: 02-10-15-20-30Friday: 06-11-18-30-31Saturday: 08-17-29-35-39
Match 6 Lotto
Monday: 04-18-27-37-43-48Thursday:10-24-26-31-39-49
Powerball
Wednesday: 03-07-11-15-28powerball:12Saturday: 04-13-39-46-51powerball: 01
Mega Millions
Tuesday: 30-32-33-42-48Megaball: 07Megaplier: 04Friday:10-18-36-38-44Megaball: 08Megaplier: 04
 WEEKLY LOTTERSUMMARY 
 
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 PAGE 3A
L
OCAL
timesleader.com
PITTSTON
Freshmen orientation set
P
ittston Area Senior High School will host a freshmen orientationfrom 9 to11:30 a.m. Aug. 28. Allninth-grade students and newly enrolled transfer students (grades9-12) and their parents/guardians areencouraged to attend.Students and their parents are toreport to the high school auditoriumpromptly at 9 a.m. for a short pre-sentation. Students will have theopportunity to receive their sched-ules, lockers and student handbooks.Also, students and parents will havethe opportunity to tour the schooland meet teachers, counselors andprincipals.
LEHMAN TWP.
Time for Arts at Hayfield
On Aug. 26, more than120 arti-sans, musicians, crafters and more will converge on the Penn State Wilkes-Barre campus for the 28thAnnual Arts at Hayfield SummerFestival from10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. There will be tours of HayfieldHouse, set for11a.m.,1p.m. and2:30 p.m.A requested $2 donation for adultssupports an annual achievementaward to an arts-oriented Penn State Wilkes-Barre student, donations topublic performances offered by theFM Kirby Center, Misericordia Uni- versity, the Fine Arts Musical Pro-gram at the Shavertown UnitedMethodist Church and to GreatBooks at Penn State Wilkes-Barre, as well as support for arts-orientedprojects at local libraries and pro-grams at Penn State Wilkes-Barre.
DALLAS
VFW consultant at office
A VFW claims consultant will beavailable for scheduled appointmentsat state Sen. Lisa Baker’s office, 22Dallas Shopping Center, on Friday.All veterans, not just VFW members,can request appoint-ments between 8:30a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Toschedule a visitplease call (570) 675-3931.
 WILKES-BARRE
City offers flu vaccines
 The Wilkes-Barre City HealthDepartment has announced thefollowing dates for free flu vaccina-tion clinics at the Kirby Health Cen-ter, 71N. Franklin St.:Friday, Oct.12, 5 to 8 p.m. (drive-thru clinic); Saturday, Oct,13,10a.m. to 2 p.m. (drive-thru clinic); Thursday, Oct.18, 3 to 7 p.m.; Mon-day, Oct. 22,1to 4 p.m.; Friday, Oct.26,10 a.m. to1p.m.; Monday, Oct.29, 3 to 7 p.m. The clinic hours were set to in-clude late afternoon and early eve-ning hours as well as weekends tomaximize convenience for residentsto be vaccinated prior to the up-coming flu season. The Wilkes-BarreCity Health Department will alsohold vaccination clinics at King’sCollege for students and faculty.
ALLENTOWN
Old refrigerators wanted
 Think you might have the oldestrefrigerator in the PPL Electric Util-ities service area, or maybe in theentire state? Time is growing short to find outand possibly win a prize to boot.PPL Electric Utilities customershave until the end of August to recy-cle their old, energy-guzzling iceboxand automatically be entered intothe oldest refrigerator contest being run by JACO Environmental andother utilities around the state, in-cluding PPL Electric Utilities. Some vintage units have already been recy-cled. The PPL Electric Utilities custom-er who recycles the oldest refriger-ator in the utility’s service territory  will win a $250 gift card. That unit will then compete with iceboxesrecycled by other utilities in the statefor a $1,000 gift card and the honorof being deemed the state’s oldestrefrigerator. Winners will be an-nounced in September.Recycling and contest details canbe found atpplelectric.com/recycleorby calling1-877-270-3522.
NEWS IN BRIEF
Baker
 WILKES-BARRE – Log on and soundoff; anyone with Internet access can of-fer their virtual two cents on what qual-ities the next Wilkes-Barre Area SchoolDistrict superintendent needs, courtesy of a survey on the district’s website(www.wbasd.k12.pa.us).“We’re asking key stakeholder groupsabout what they see as the challengesfacingthedistrictaswellaswhatcharac-teristics they want in the superintend-ent,” said Britta Barrickman, director of schoolpersonnelservicesatthePennsyl- vania School Boards Association. The Wilkes-Barre Area board commissionedthe PSBA to help conduct the search fora replacement for retiring Superintend-ent Jeff Namey.Barrickman said the PSBA has beenadvertising online and in key educationpublications at the state, regional andnational level, and is “in the open appli-cation period.” The board will not betoldwhoorevenhowmanypeoplehaveapplied until the application deadline of Sept.10, she added. The survey is an option PSBA offers,and Wilkes-Barre Area board membersaccepted. There are three sections. Thefirst asks for general identification of “the interest group that best describes you, including board member, commu-nitymember,staffmemberandstudent. Theothertwosectionsaskthepartici-pant to rate the importance of severalqualifications needed by the candidatesand top challenges faced by the district.Barrickmansaidtheanswersarecom-piled and reviewed with the board. “Weutilize it to create well-structured ques-tions (for candidates) based on whatstakeholders see as key characteristicsas well as challenges to the district.” The PSBA also does initial screening of candidates, checking references andmaking sure they have up-to-date cre-dentials and required clearances.“We assist the board throughout theprocess, including facilitating the inter- views,” Barrickman said, but ultimately “Allkeydecisionsofthesearchareintheboard’s hands.Board President Mary Ann Toole saidshehadwantedto“openuptheprocess”of replacing Namey, who steps downAug.31afterworking42yearsinthedis-trict. Toole also said she’s been im-pressed by the PSBA’s work. Thesurveywillremainonthewebsiteuntil Aug. 30.
You can help find superintendent
Residents can tell Wilkes-Barre Areaofficials what they want in newschool leader, via online survey.
ByMARKGUYDISH
 mguydish@timesleader.com
Mark Guydish
can be reached at 829-7161
HANOVER TWP. – Residents of Lu-zerne County deposited an estimated500,000 pounds of useless answering ma-chines, televisions, computer equipment,camcordersandotherconsumergoodsonSaturday at the 20th Electronic Recycling Collection sponsored by the LuzerneCountySolidWasteManagementDepart-ment at the Hanover Area Junior/SeniorHigh School.For10yearsthecountyhasbeencollect-ingrecyclables,andmorethan3.6millionpounds of electronics were collected be-tween 2003 and 2011, said Elizabeth De-Nardi, recycling coordinator for the coun-ty.An estimated 2,500 cars rolled throughthecollectionsiteorganizedbycountyof-ficials, which DeNardi called another“success.”"We’ve never had a ‘bad’ day," she said. Whenlookingatthebenefitsofthepro-gram,DeNardicitesmany.First,itisafreeservice for the residents, which they ap-preciate, she said."I wish I had a nickel for every person whosaidtheywerelookingforwardtothiseach year," she added.Plus,itsaveslandfillspace,createsjobs,saves natural resources and helps “com-plete the recycling loop,” she said. The item received in the largest quanti-ty is televisions, DeNardi said. After 10 years they continue to pour in, even largeconsole televisions that have “flood mud”on them, she added.RecyclingfirmEcoInternational,basedin Vestal, N.Y., takes care of the actualphysical collection, hand loading every-thingintothebackofseverallargetrucks. The company takes the goods, breaksthem down into their various materialsandsellsthematerialsontheopenmarketforrecycling,saidJoeNardone,vicepresi-dent of business development. Approxi-mately95percentofwhatiscollectedcanbe reused, he said.In mass, the collected items contain a lot of “commodities," Nardone said, which includes various precious metals,plastics, and glass. These materials are indemand on the open market. Some of thecircuit boards or motherboards found incomputers can actually be sold complete,he added.Nardone pointed out Luzerne County 
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Rodney Small, left, and Walter Powell move a large TV screen to a trailer for electronic recycling Saturday morning at Hanov-er Area Junior/Senior High School.
E-cycling is termed a success
About 2,500 cars roll into collectionsite, where county residents depositestimated 500,000 pounds of items.
ByRALPHNARDONE 
Times Leader Correspondent
See RECYCLING, Page 9A
HAZLE TWP. Healthand wellness and family fun were brought together on community-wide scale at the Third Annual Alliance Fam-ily Fun and Health Day Sat-urday in Hazle Township. The event was sponsoredby the Greater HazletonHealth Alliance at its Healthand Wellness Center cam-pus, where adults and chil-dren of all ages gathered totake part in activities rang-ing from medication man-agement to moon bouncing.About 100 people roamedthe grounds at the center just after noon under a sunny summer sky. With the smellof hot dogs cooking on a grilland youngsters laughing asthey scurried about withpainted faces, it seemed likemore of a community picnicthan a health fair, but accord-ing to Barbara Biacco, direc-tor of marketing and busi-ness development for the al-liance, the day was all aboutbringing a sense of both toattendees.
Health Alliance offers public a dose of fun
The Hazleton-area eventmixes vital information withactivities for the family.
ByBOBBYMASO
Times Leader Correspondent
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Marianne Herbener, left, of Hazleton gets her blood pressurechecked by registered nurse Heather Sugarman.
See FAIR, Page 9AINSIDE:
See Click photos from theevent,
Page11A
AsPPLElectricUtilitiesworksto submit an application for new power line traversing partsof Luzerne, Lackawanna andMonroecounties,possiblybytheend of summer, several stateagencies are hoping to minimizeenvironmen-tal impactsfrom the 57-mile span. The pro-posed routeof the newline origi-nates at theJenkins Sub-station inPlains Township,travelsthroughBear Creekand Bucktownshipsinto Thorn-hurst andpast Lake Wallenpau-pak beforeculminating at the exist-ing PaupakSubstationin Wayne County. Along the way the line would pass through sev-eral state gamelands, the Lacka- wanna State Forest and tributar-ies of the Lehigh River.DeanDruckenmiller,presidentof the Lehigh River ColdwaterAssociation, said his group iskeeping close tabs on the pro-posed line and hopes impacts onthe river tributaries can be mini-mized.“We don’t like to see any clear-ing along a waterway becauseonceyouremovethattreecanopy  you get a thermal impact on thatstream,” Druckenmiller said. “It would be beneficial if they canmaintain a canopy over thestreams.”PPL spokesman Paul Wirthsaidstreamcrossingsforthenew150-foot wide right-of-way are in-evitable, but the company doestry to minimize the impacts in a number of ways.Polelocationsareshiftedasfarback from the stream bank aspossible, resulting in less clear-ing along the waterway for crane pad, Wirth said.Also,streamcrossingsareusu-ally made at a right angle so thecleared area is as narrow as pos-sible, according to Wirth. ThelinecrossesportionsoftheLackawanna State Forest along 
Power topreventspan’simpact
State agencies work tominimize environmental woesfrom PPL’s new line.
ByTOMVENESK
tvenesky@timesleader.com
See POWER, Page 9A
PPL is seekingpublic commenton the proposedNortheast/PoconoReliability Projectpower line.Comments may besubmitted onlineat http://nep.pplreliable-power.com/Publi-cInvolvement orby phone at1-888-654-0823.PPL offers aninteractive mapfor the public tomark areas ofconcern. The mapcan be found athttp://nep.pplre-liablepower.com/InteractiveMap/PublicInputMa-p.aspx.
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