Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Ryan on Education

Ryan on Education

Ratings: (0)|Views: 3|Likes:
Published by americanbridge21

More info:

Published by: americanbridge21 on Aug 13, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/13/2015

pdf

text

original

 
 
EDUCATION
Ryan Supported Block Granting of Education Programs.
. In 1999, Ryan voted in favor of a bill that would establish a new block grant combining three existing education programs
 – 
a teacher performanceprogram, the Goals 2000 program and a program to reduce class size by hiring 100,000 teachers. The new grant was authorized at $2 billion per year for five years, and states were given greater flexibility in deciding how to spend the funds. The bill passed 239-185Roll Call 320, H 1995, 07/20/1999 ] 
Paul Ryan Supported Block Granting of Education Programs.
In 1999, Paul Ryan voted in favor of abill that would establish a new block grant combining three existing education programs
 – 
a teacherperformance program, the Goals 2000 program and a program to reduce class size by hiring 100,000 teachers. The new grant was authorized at $2 billion per year for five years, and states were given greater flexibility indeciding how to spend the funds. The bill passed 239-185.Roll Call 320, H 1995, 07/20/1999 ] 
Ryan Voted For Ed Flex Bill.
Ryan voted in favor of Passage of the bill to expand the current EducationFlexibility Partnership program by making all 50 states eligible to participate in the program, instead of justthe 12 states permitted under current law. Under the bill, participating states could waive certain federalstatutory or regulatory requirements for education programs, as well as state requirements. The bill removesthe Ed-Flex program from the Goals 2000 statute, but requires states to have implemented content andperformance standards and assessments required under the Title I program for disadvantaged students. Healso voted for the conference report.Roll Call 94, H 800, 04/21/1999 ] 
Ryan Supported Removing Nearly 112,000 Students from Work Study Programs.
In 1999, Ryan votedin favor of the 2000 GOP budget resolution, which would remove nearly 112,000 students from the Work Study Program. The budget passed 220 to 208.Roll Call 85, S 68, 04/14/1999 ] 
Paul Ryan Supported Removing Nearly 112,000 Students from Work Study Programs.
In 1999, PaulRyan voted in favor of the 2000 GOP budget resolution, which would remove nearly 112,000 students fromthe Work Study Program. The budget passed 220 to 208.Roll Call 85, S 68, 04/14/1999 ] 
Ryan Voted For Ed Flex Bill.
Ryan voted in favor of Passage of the bill to expand the current EducationFlexibility Partnership program by making all 50 states eligible to participate in the program, instead of justthe 12 states permitted under current law. Under the bill, participating states could waive certain federalstatutory or regulatory requirements for education programs, as well as state requirements. The bill removesthe Ed-Flex program from the Goals 2000 statute, but requires states to have implemented content andperformance standards and assessments required under the Title I program for disadvantaged students. Healso voted for the conference report.Roll Call 41, H 800, 03/11/1999 ] 
Ryan Voted Against an Amendment Prohibiting the Diversion of Funds from Poorer SchoolDistricts.
On March 11, 1999, Ryan voted against a Scott (D-VA) amendment to an education flexibility bill. The bill would prohibit states from waiving Title 1 requirements if 35% of the children or more in the schooldistrict come from low-income families. According to the Wisconsin State Journal,
 Two WisconsinDemocrats, however, were among those voting against the House bill, claiming it could take money away from needy school districts.
 This bill makes it easier to divert money from schools that need help the most toschools that need help the least,
said Rep. David Obey of Wausau. Rep. Tom Barrett said he voted againstthe measure because it lacked assurances that it will not steer money away from the Title 1 program, whichdirects funds to poorer schools.
Everybody likes the idea of more flexibility, but there needs to be a balancestruck between flexibility and fairness,
said the Milwaukee Democrat. A Democratic amendment offered toaddress this issue was defeated 195-223.Roll Call 40, H 800, 03/11/1999;Wisconsin State Journal, 03/12/99]
 
 
 Affordability
Ryan Voted to Strip $5.9 Billion in Health Care Funding to Extend Student Loan Interest Rates.
On April 27, 2012, Ryan voted for extending current student loan interest rates. According to the New York  Times,
 The bill, which would strip $5.9 billion from a program within the health care law to pay to keeprates on subsidized undergraduate loans at 3.4 percent, is all but certain to fail in the Senate, where lawmakershave put together their own measure to keep the rate from reverting to 6.8 percent by closing tax loopholesfor some wealthy business owners.
 Roll Call 195, H 4628, 04/27/2012;New York Times, 4/28/12]
 Paul Ryan Voted Against Expanding Access To Higher Education.
Paul Ryan voted against a measureto replace costly private student loans with federal government loans by eliminating the Federal Family Education loan program. The legislation would provide for a competitive bidding process for entities toservice the loans. The bill would make several modifications to education programs, including increasing funding for Pell grants, early-childhood education and community colleges.Roll Call 719, H 3221,09/17/2009 ] 
Ryan Voted Against a $2,500 Tax Credit for College Students.
Ryan voted against the conference reportof the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The act created the American Opportunity TaxCredit, an expansion of an existing tax break called the Hope Scholarship Credit. The new credit allowed for100 percent of the first $2,000 in tuition and related fees and 25 percent of the second $2,000 (for a total of $2,500). That increased from a maximum of $1,800 previously.Roll Call 70, H 1, 02/13/2009;Chicago  Tribune, 3/01/09]
 
For-Profit Colleges
Ryan Voted to Repeal New Department of Education Rules Governing For-Profit Colleges.
OnFebruary 28, 2012, Ryan voted for the bill that would rescind Education Department regulations that define acredit hour and set minimum requirements that all higher education institutions must meet to be consideredauthorized by a state. It also would bar the Education secretary from establishing or enforcing any new rulesto define the term
credit hour.
According to the Washington Post,
 The House sent the Senate a bill (H2117) to repeal new Department of Education rules governing for- profit colleges and universities. One rulerequires such institutions to meet accreditation requirements in each state in which they have students andestablishes state-by-state processes for handling student complaints. Another rule targeted by the bill sets auniform definition of what constitutes a credit hour for purposes of allocating federal financial aid. The rulesare scheduled to take effect in July 2014. For-profit schools, many of which specialize in online or
distance
 degree programs, account for 11 percent of U.S. higher-education students and rely heavily on federally backed student loans and federal grants for their revenue. Their students receive about one-quarter of allstudent loans and make up 43 percent of those who default on such loans, according to the Department of Education. Some of the best- known for-profit institutions are Capella, Kaplan and DeVry universities andthe University of Phoenix.
 Roll Call 79, H 2117, 02/28/2012;Washington Post, 3/8/12]
 
 
Funding
Ryan Opposed Increase for Special Education, Teacher Quality Programs.
In 2003, Ryan voted againstthe Consolidated Appropriations bill for fiscal year 2003, which increased funding for the IDEA specialeducation programs. The bill included a $3.2 billion increase for education programs over the FY 02 level of 
 
$49.9 billion (for a total of $53.1 billion). Specific increases included $1.4 billion increases for Title I (for atotal of $11.7 billion) and IDEA special education (for a total of $8.9 billion). The bill also increasedinvestments for Teacher Quality (increase from $2.85 billion to $2.93 billion) and Math-Science programs(increase from $12.5 million to $100.3 million). The bill passed 338-83.Roll Call 32, S 2, 02/13/2003 ]
 Paul Ryan Voted For Across-The-Board Cut To Education Initiatives.
In 1999, Ryan voted for theconference report on the fiscal 2000 DC/Labor-HHS-Education appropriations bill, which would make anacross-the-board cut of 0.97 percent to the agencies it funded. President Clinton pledged a veto because of the damage he said the spending cuts would inflict on schools and other programs.Roll Call 549, H 3064,10/28/1999;AP, 10/28/99]
 Paul Ryan Opposed Fiscally Responsible FY 2009 Budget With $85.3 Billion for Education.
In 2008,Paul Ryan voted against a budget resolution that would establish the congressional budget for FY 2009. Theresolution would call for expenditures of $3.1 trillion and would allow up to $1 trillion in discretionary spending, plus $70 billion for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and $5.8 billion for hurricane recovery. Thebill would also include $85.3 billion for education, training, employment and social services, an amount that was $7.1 billion more than President Bush had requested.Roll Call 141, S 312, 03/13/2008;Congressional Quarterly;
Summary of the 2009 Democratic Budget,
House Committee on the Budget, 3/11/08]
Ryan Opposed Reauthorization of Higher Education Act.
In 2008, Ryan voted against a bill that wouldreauthorize the Higher Education Act through fiscal 2012, including a wide range of post-secondary programs, including student loans and teacher training. The measure would raise the maximum Pell grantaward from $5,800 to $9,000 and allow the grants to be used year-round. A major provision includedincreasing the amount of information that schools and lenders must provide students and barring lendersfrom giving schools any perks to get on a
preferred lender
list. It would also create a
higher educationprice index
to compare tuition increases. The bill also would allow the federal government to penalize statesthat substantially decrease their contributions to public colleges and universities. The bill passed 354-58RollCall 40, H 4137, 02/07/2008;Congressional Quarterly Weekly, 2/09/08]
Ryan Voted to Sustain Bush Veto on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations.
In 2007, Ryan voted against an override of President Bush
s veto of the bill to appropriate$150.7 billion in fiscal 2008 for the departments of Labor, Health and Human Services and Education andrelated agencies. The legislation provided $63.6 billion for the Education Department, including $14.5 billionfor Pell Grants; $15 billion for the Labor Department, including $3.6 billion for training and employmentservices; and $30 billion for the National Institutes of Health. The veto override failed, 277-141.Roll Call1122, H 3043, 11/15/2007;Congressional Quarterly]
Ryan Opposed FY08 Budget that Invested in Education, Innovation Agenda.
In 2007, Ryan votedagainst the fiscal year 2008 budget conference report that began to reverse six years of Republican fiscalmismanagement, provided for middle-class tax relief and would return the budget to balance
 – 
reaching asurplus of $41 billion in 2012
 – 
without raising taxes. The budget provided $9.5 billion more for education,training, and social services than President Bush requested, including funding for No Child Left Behindprograms, special education, and aid to help students afford college. The budget also increased funding forHead Start and child care while funding the House Democratic innovation agenda, putting us on a path todouble funding for the National Science Foundation and providing significant increases in K-12 math andscience education. The budget passed 214-209Roll Call 377, S 21, 05/17/2007;House Budget Committee, Overview of FY2008 Budget Conference Agreement, 5/16/07, SCR 21, House Budget Committee,Conference Agreement on the FY 2008 Budget Resolution: Building on the
Six for
06, 5/24/07]
Ryan Supported Higher Education Funding Bill that Did Not Make College More Affordable.
In2006, Ryan voted in favor of a bill authorizing funds for higher education aid. The measure would simplify the financial aid application and make Pell Grants, the major grant that helps low- and middle-income

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->