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WRIT 102 Syllabus Template Fall 2012

WRIT 102 Syllabus Template Fall 2012

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Course:
WRIT 102
e-mail:
wdgoldbe@olemiss.edu
Term:
Fall 2012
Office:
Somerville 102
Office Hours:
MW 11-12, 1-2, and by appointment
Instructor:
Wendy Goldberg
Sections:
2, 6, 17
Course Description:
WRIT 102 (Writing 102) is a theme-based, first-year writing coursedesigned to build on writing skills learned in ENGL/WRIT 100/101 and develop critical thinkingand research skills appropriate for use in academic writing. The course pays special attention todeveloping argumentative skills, analyzing texts, and synthesizing information into thoughtful,coherent essays and projects. Students enrolled in WRIT 102 will produce papers that are longerand more in-depth than in ENGL/WRIT 100/101. The course culminates in a final portfolio of 
the student’s work.
Course Outcomes:
The objectives of this course are (1) to develop basic writing skills learnedin ENGL 101, including the understanding that writing is a process that develops over timethrough revision (2) to write for specific purposes and for specific audiences, (3) to respondcritically to different points of view, allowing the student to create effective and sustainablearguments, (4) to become skilled at locating primary and secondary research from a variety of sources and at evaluating their reliability, and (5) to become effective researchers and writers of research papers as a member of an active writing, reading, and researching community.
[SELECT WHICH THEME YOU ARE TEACHING]
For all themes, the Common Reader,
Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter 
by Tom Franklin is anoptional text.
Course Theme: Business.
How many economic decisions have you made today? From whatyou had for breakfast to what you decided to wear to class, your choices have been influenced bybusinesses, both local and global. But there may be some issues of which you are many not evenbe aware. In this class we will explore a variety of questions related to business, including, butnot limited to: is Wal-Mart good for America? Should corporations have the same legal rights asthat of an individual person? Is out-sourcing jobs a good idea? What ethical obligations does abusiness have to the environment? to our health? to the nation?
Required Texts
 
 Money
, Ed. Kenneth M. Gillam, Fountainhead Press, 2011Handouts and readings on reserve/online.
 A Writer’s Reference
, 7
th
Edition
(Please buy the Ole Miss custom edition from the Ole MissBookstore.)
Diana Hacker and Nancy Sommers ; Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2011
.ISBN: 978-1-4576-0413-3
 
Course Theme: Environment.
What is the meaning of ecology and nature? What counts as anenvironment? How do current issues about our environment affect our daily lives? How do webegin to connect with and investigate the real issues of impacting local ecologies andenvironments? We will read and analyze a variety of genres
 — 
literary, social commentary,cultural analyses, theory, and philosophy that relate to our theme.
Required Texts
 
 Literature and the Environment 
. Eds. Lorraine Anderson, Scott Slovic, and John P. O’Grady.
Longman, 1999.
 A Writer’s Reference
, 7
th
Edition
(Please buy the Ole Miss custom edition from the Ole MissBookstore.)
Diana Hacker and Nancy Sommers ; Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2011.
ISBN: 978-1-4576-0413-3
Course Theme: Food.
This WRIT 102 class looks at writings and arguments about food in theUnited States. From the beginnings of food--planting, growing, feeding, and raising; to the saleof food--harvesting, vending, and herding; to the effects that food have on those who eat it--environmental, governmental, health, and economical impacts--we will discuss the importanceand impact of food in the lives of 20th and 21st century Americans. In discussing the world of food, students will contribute critical evaluations and ambitious arguments to the already on-going conversations.
Required Texts
 
Food 
. Eds. Brooke Rollins and Lee Bauknight. Fountainhead, 2011.Handouts and readings on reserve/online.
 A Writer’s Reference
, 7
th
Edition
(Please buy the Ole Miss custom edition from the Ole MissBookstore.)
Diana Hacker and Nancy Sommers ; Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2011.
ISBN: 978-1-4576-0413-3
Course Theme: Literature as Argument.
In this section of WRIT 102, we will approachliterature as an argument that constructs, deconstructs, presents, discusses, and questions aspecific place, time, and/or culture. In our textbook,
 Literature and the Writing Process,
we willread a variety of literary genres -- fiction, poetry, and drama. At first, we will become skilled atreading literature critically and at constructing our own arguments about what the literature istelling us; then, we will learn how to integrate and respond to what other scholarly secondarysources argue.
 Required Texts
 
 Literature and the Writing Process
. 9
th
Edition. Eds. Elizabeth McMahan, et al. Longman, 2011.
 A Writer’s Reference
, 7
th
Edition
(Please buy the Ole Miss custom edition from the Ole MissBookstore.)
Diana Hacker and Nancy Sommers ; Bedford/St.
Martin’s, 2011.
ISBN: 978-1-4576-0413-3
 
Course Theme: Pop Culture.
Films, music, television, advertising
 — 
in our daily lives we oursurrounded by and inundated with a constant stream of information. But how often do we stop toask ourselves what it all means? In this theme of WRIT 102 we will turn a critical eye onpopular culture to examine the various ways in which we influence and are influenced by pop
culture. Some questions we will attempt to answer are: “how are we affected by advertising?”“What can we learn from television, film, and music?” and “what are the roles of race andgender in popular culture?” Students should come into this course prepared to examine critically
and thoroughly a variety of a mediums and sources that are often disregarded or taken forgranted.
Required Texts
 
Signs of Life in the USA: Readings on Popular Culture for Writers
. 7
th
Edition. Eds. Sonia
Maasik and Jack Solomon; Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2012.
 
 A Writer’s Reference
, 7
th
Edition
(Please buy the Ole Miss custom edition from the Ole MissBookstore.)
Diana Hacker and Nancy Sommers ; Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2011.
ISBN: 978-1-4576-0413-3
[ALL THEMED COURSES WILL INCLUDE THE BELOW INFORMATION]Required Materials
 wi-fi enabled laptop, notebook, pens, pencils
Major Assignments and Grade Weighting
 
Grading Scale
 1. Analysis Essay (10%) A 93-100%2. In-class Essay (5%) A- 90-92%3. Synthesis Essay (15%) B+ 87-89%4. Research Paper (20%) B 83-86%5. Multimodal Project (15%) B- 80-82%6. Electronic Portfolio (25%) C+ 77-79%7. Homework/Class Participation (10 %) C 73-76%C- 70-72%D 65-69%F 64-below
Attendance Policy
Students are expected to attend all class meetings. Improving writing skills takes time and is aprocess unlike learning content alone. In acknowledgment of the fact that students mayexperience some circumstances which prevent complete attendance, the following policy is ineffect:
MWF Courses
5 absences: final course grade lowered by 1 letter grade6 absences: final course grade lowered by 2 letter grades

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