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Fast Facts: Back to School: 2012-2013

Fast Facts: Back to School: 2012-2013

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Published by: LJ's infoDOCKET on Aug 15, 2012
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July 24, 2012
Back to School: 2012-2013
By August, summertime will be winding down and vacations will be coming to an end, signalingthat back-to-school time is near. It’s a time that many children eagerly anticipate — catching upwith old friends and making new ones, and settling into a new daily routine. Parents and childrenalike scan the newspapers and websites looking for sales to shop for a multitude of schoolsupplies and the latest clothing fads and essentials. This edition of 
Facts for Features
highlightsthe many statistics associated with the return to classrooms by our nation’s students and teachers.
Back-to-School Shopping$7.7 billion
The amount of money spent at family clothing stores in August 2011. Only in November and
December were sales higher. Similarly, sales at book stores in August 2011 totaled $2.4 billion,
the strongest sales month of the year.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Monthly Retail Trade and Food Services
For back-to-school shopping, choices of retail establishments abound: In 2009, there were
28,520 family clothing stores, 7,092 children and infants clothing stores, 26,651 shoe stores,
8,945 office supply and stationery stores, 21,628 sporting goods stores, 9,390 bookstores and
8,663 department stores.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns: 2009
Students79 million
The number of children and adults enrolled in school throughout the country in October 2010 —
from nursery school to college. They comprised 27 percent of the entire population age 3 and
older.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, School Enrollment – Social and Economic Characteristics of 
Students: October 2010, Table 1
 
 
Pre-K through 12 Enrollment
72%
Percentage of children 3 to 6 enrolled in kindergarten who attended all day, as of October 2010.Source: U.S. Census Bureau, School Enrollment – Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2010, Table 3<http://www.census.gov/hhes/school/data/cps/2010/tables.html>
24%
Percentage of elementary through high school students who had at least one foreign-born parentin October 2010.Source: U.S. Census Bureau, School Enrollment – Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2010, Table 1<http://www.census.gov/hhes/school/data/cps/2010/tables.html>
27%
Percentage of students ages 12 to 17 who were in a gifted class in 2009.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, A Child’s Day: 2009 (Selected Indicators of Child Well-Being),
70%
Percentage of 6- to 17-year-olds who were highly engaged in school (children reported as liking
school, being interested in school and working hard in school) in 2009.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, A Child’s Day: 2009 (Selected Indicators of Child Well-Being);
Languages11.8 million
Number of school-age children (5 to 17) who spoke a language other than English at home in
2010; 8.5 million of these children spoke Spanish at home.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey
Colleges16%
Percentage of all college students 35 and older in October 2010. They made up 34 percent of those attending school part time.Source: U.S. Census Bureau, School Enrollment – Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2010, Table 5<http://www.census.gov/hhes/school/data/cps/2010/tables.html>

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