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The Shocking Truth about Goats' Milk

The Shocking Truth about Goats' Milk

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Published by Vegan Future
A Viva! undercover investigation into the British dairy goat industry has uncovered shocking death, mutilation and disease.

Find out more in this fully referenced report by Juliet Gellatley BSc, Dip CNM, founder & director, Viva! & Justin Kerswell BA, MSc, campaigns director, Viva!

Support the work of Viva at
http://www.viva.org.uk/supporter/membershipform.htm
A Viva! undercover investigation into the British dairy goat industry has uncovered shocking death, mutilation and disease.

Find out more in this fully referenced report by Juliet Gellatley BSc, Dip CNM, founder & director, Viva! & Justin Kerswell BA, MSc, campaigns director, Viva!

Support the work of Viva at
http://www.viva.org.uk/supporter/membershipform.htm

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Published by: Vegan Future on Aug 16, 2012
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08/16/2012

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The welfare of dairygoats and human healthconsequences ofconsuming goats’ milk
A report by Juliet Gellatley BSc, Dip CNM, founder & director,Viva! and Justin Kerswell BA, MSc, campaigns director, Viva!
The kids are alright 
 
 no t
 
Background 
The domestic goat (
Capra aegagrus hircus
) is asubspecies domesticated from the wild goat ofsouthwest Asia and Eastern Europe. They are amember of the Bovidae family and are closely relatedto sheep as both are in the goat-antelope subfamilyCaprinae. There are over 300 distinct breeds of goat.Female goats are referred to as ‘does’ or ‘nannies’,intact males as ‘bucks’ or ‘billies’; their offspring areknown as kids.There are approximately 500 million goatsworldwide. Globally, more goats are kept for theirmeat than their milk or hair.
Goat nature 
Goats are active and inquisitive. It has been said thatsheep are conformists whereas goats are capricious,unpredictable, flighty, impulsive and whimsical. Theword capricious comes from the Latin for goat(capra). Put into a new field, goats will examine theperimeter and finding a gap they will escape!Whereas some species will run scared from a lowflying plane, goats are more likely to look up andwatch. They are endlessly curious. It is shameful thatthese highly intelligent, playful, friendly animals areincreasingly being factory farmed across theindustrialised world.It is distressing and sad to see animals of such anindependent spirit intensively farmed in zero-grazing sheds.2
Goat’s cheese and milk is becoming increasingly popular amongst consumers; with many mistakenlypresuming that the welfare problems inherent in the milking of dairy cows do not apply to goats.The truth is that British goats suffer as much as dairy cows: with their babies taken away from them almostimmediately (the females to replenish the herd and the males either killed at birth or kept for meat). Also,animals uniquely suited to thriving on tough, mountainous terrains are increasingly kept indoors their wholelives in massive zero-grazing units.
The kids are not alright 
 
The UK industry
Although the goat dairy herd is smaller in the UKthan some other countries it is increasing quickly. It isestimated that the national herd is currently around90,000. Of those, 10,000 are kept for their fibres (suchas Angora and Cashmere breeds) and another 10,000are so-called meat goats (usually Boer breed or Boercross) (9). This puts the UK dairy goat herd atapproximately 70,000.In UK commercial dairy farms the Saanen (fromSwitzerland) or Saanen type is mostly used as this breedhas a high milk yield and a relatively placid nature.Smaller extensive (free-range) and larger intensive(indoor) systems exist in the UK, with a rapid movetowards the latter as it is easier for farmers tomanage and provides a higher return. Indeed, herdsin excess of 2,000 goats are not unheard of in the UKand are becoming increasingly common (2) (5) (8).Some reports havesaid that themarket for goatdairy products isincreasing by 20-30per cent a year inthe UK (1) (11). It isbelieved that themarket is worth inexcess of £50 milliona year in the UKalone (9) (11).According to thegoat industry, 2012 isthe first year Briton’swill drink more thantwo million litres ofgoats’ milk (19).
Milking machines 
Female goats typically give birth (kidding) for the firsttime at 18 months. They are impregnated eitherartificially or, more usually, by ‘stud’ billies from highmilking stocks (21). They have a five monthpregnancy and high yielding dairy breeds often havetwins or triplets (21). (In the natural state, indigenousgoats usually have one kid with each pregnancy.)Lactation (producing milk) can continue for up to twoyears following giving birth in a non-pregnant goatbut as this longer lactation results in a lower milkyield than if the doe is bred again (22), mostcommercial farms breed the nanny goats every year.With a view of improving milk yields even furthersome are impregnated with semen that has beenselected with ‘improver’ genetics (5).
Kidding the reproductive system
According to the Universities Federation for AnimalWelfare (UFAW), “Many European farmers will beinterested in controlling the breeding season in orderto stimulate the goats into breeding all the yearround to eliminate the problems of seasonal milkproduction. The two methods used … areintravaginal hormonal sponges or artificial lightingregimes.” (21.)The sponge involvesimplanting a spongeimpregnated with thehormone progesteroneinto the vagina for 11days. Two days before it’sremoved the goat isinjected with pregnant’mare’s serumgonadotrophin (PMSG)and prostaglandin. Thehormones stimulate thegoats to come intooestrus one to two daysafter sponge removal. IfAI is used, the goats areinseminated 42 to 44 hours after sponge removal.In the UK, the decreasing daylight and increasingdark stimulate breeding in goats. The longer nightsstimulate the release of melatonin which in turnstimulates the release of hormones which make theovaries release an egg (oestrus).Intensive farmers may mimic this affect by subjectingthe goats to increased light in the winter and thenreverting to periods of darkness. The
Dairy Goat  Journal 
recommends exposing goats to 20 hours oflight for 60 days during January to March; oestrusoccurs 10 weeks after a return to ambient lighting (21).3
The welfare of dairy goats and human health consequences of consuming goats’ milkThe welfare of dairy goats and human health consequences of consuming goats’ milk

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