Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
January First by Michael Schofield - Author Q&A

January First by Michael Schofield - Author Q&A

Ratings: (0)|Views: 168|Likes:
Michael Schofield’s daughter January is at the mercy of her imaginary friends, except they aren’t the imaginary friends that most young children have; they are hallucinations. And January is caught in the conflict between our world and their world, a place she calls Calalini. Some of these hallucinations, like “24 Hours,” are friendly and some, like “400 the Cat” and “Wednesday the Rat,” bite and scratch her until she does what they want. They often tell her to scream at strangers, jump out of buildings, and attack her baby brother.

At six years old, January Schofield, “Janni,” to her family, was diagnosed with schizophrenia, one of the worst mental illnesses known to man. What’s more, schizophrenia is 20 to 30 times more severe in children than in adults and in January’s case, doctors say, she is hallucinating 95 percent of the time that she is awake. Potent psychiatric drugs that would level most adults barely faze her.

January First captures Michael and his family's remarkable story in a narrative that forges new territory within books about mental illness. In the beginning, readers see Janni’s incredible early potential: her brilliance, and savant-like ability to learn extremely abstract concepts. Next, they witnesses early warning signs that something is not right, Michael’s attempts to rationalize what’s happening, and his descent alongside his daughter into the abyss of schizophrenia. Their battle has included a two-year search for answers, countless medications and hospitalizations, allegations of abuse, despair that almost broke their family apart and, finally, victories against the illness and a new faith that they can create a life for Janni filled with moments of happiness.

A compelling, unsparing and passionate account, January First vividly details Schofield’s commitment to bring his daughter back from the edge of insanity. It is a father’s soul-baring memoir of the daily struggles and challenges he and his wife face as they do everything they can to help Janni while trying to keep their family together.

To read more about January First or Michael Schofield please visit Crown Publishing at www.crownpublishing.com.
Michael Schofield’s daughter January is at the mercy of her imaginary friends, except they aren’t the imaginary friends that most young children have; they are hallucinations. And January is caught in the conflict between our world and their world, a place she calls Calalini. Some of these hallucinations, like “24 Hours,” are friendly and some, like “400 the Cat” and “Wednesday the Rat,” bite and scratch her until she does what they want. They often tell her to scream at strangers, jump out of buildings, and attack her baby brother.

At six years old, January Schofield, “Janni,” to her family, was diagnosed with schizophrenia, one of the worst mental illnesses known to man. What’s more, schizophrenia is 20 to 30 times more severe in children than in adults and in January’s case, doctors say, she is hallucinating 95 percent of the time that she is awake. Potent psychiatric drugs that would level most adults barely faze her.

January First captures Michael and his family's remarkable story in a narrative that forges new territory within books about mental illness. In the beginning, readers see Janni’s incredible early potential: her brilliance, and savant-like ability to learn extremely abstract concepts. Next, they witnesses early warning signs that something is not right, Michael’s attempts to rationalize what’s happening, and his descent alongside his daughter into the abyss of schizophrenia. Their battle has included a two-year search for answers, countless medications and hospitalizations, allegations of abuse, despair that almost broke their family apart and, finally, victories against the illness and a new faith that they can create a life for Janni filled with moments of happiness.

A compelling, unsparing and passionate account, January First vividly details Schofield’s commitment to bring his daughter back from the edge of insanity. It is a father’s soul-baring memoir of the daily struggles and challenges he and his wife face as they do everything they can to help Janni while trying to keep their family together.

To read more about January First or Michael Schofield please visit Crown Publishing at www.crownpublishing.com.

More info:

Published by: Crown Publishing Group on Aug 16, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/03/2014

pdf

text

original

 
 A Conversation withMichael Schofield, author of 
JANUARY FIRST
 A Memoir (Crown; August 7, 2012)
Photo Credit: Ivy Brown
 
Q: From her early infancy, it was clear that your daughter January (“Jani”) was unique and brilliant, even testingwith an IQ of 146 at the age of four. When did you begin to think that Jani’s differences might be related to anillness?A:
When other parents would suggest that something was wrong with Jani, I ignored them, but inside their suggestions made me angry. To me, Jani was a genius, and throughout history most geniuses have beenmisunderstood.It wasn’t until the violence began around the time our son, Bodhi, was born that I had to face that there wassomething wrong. During those moments of sudden, intense violence, like what I describe in chapter 5, I would holdJani down to keep her from going after Bodhi, and I would try to get her to make eye contact with me to calm her down. And when she would look into my eyes, I didn’t see my daughter there. I saw something else.But even then I still clung to the belief that this violence was coming from being a genius trapped in the body of asmall child. For me, the moment that I finally had to accept there was an illness was the first time I went to visit Janiat BHC Alhambra Hospital. She’d never been away from either Susan or myself, and I fully expected her to beterrified. But she wasn’t. She was happy, happier than I’d seen her since she was a toddler. It was like she had finallyfound the friends she’d always wanted, only she found them in a psych ward.
Q: How has your marriage to Susan evolved since Jani’s birth? How have you learned to cope as a couple in theface of Jani’s schizophrenia?A:
We almost didn’t make it. Because Jani needed constant stimulation and we had no family or friends who could provide the level of stimulation she needed, Susan and I began to see each other as the “relief shift.” We either worked or we had Jani. There was nothing else. And taking Jani was much harder than working, so whichever parenthad Jani would get increasingly resentful.When the violence and hospitalizations began, we turned on each other constantly, dragging up and throwing in eachother’s faces every mistake we had ever made with Jani. I think that when you feel like you are losing your child tosomething you can’t identify and doctors have no answers, you start to turn on everyone around you.What saved our marriage was the realization that whatever Jani had was not just her “misbehaving” and that sheneeded both of us to fight for her. I think it was fighting the school district that really made me feel as if Susan and Iwere a team again, both focused on the goal of making sure Jani was happy. So the irony is that while the stress of 

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd