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Free Press 8-17-12

Free Press 8-17-12

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04/13/2014

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WWW.CHAMPIONNEWSPAPER.COM • FRIDAY,
AUG. 17
, 2012 • VOL. 15, NO. 21 FREE
REE 
RESS 
• A PUBLICATION OF ACE III COMMUNICATIONS •
Little farm house in Lithonia
 
www.facebook.com/ championnewspaper
 
www.championnewspaper.com
 
www.twitter.com/ championnews
 
Follow us.
Serving East Atlanta, Avondale Estates, Brookhaven, Chamblee, Clarkston, Decatur, Doraville, Dunwoody, Lithonia, Pine Lake, Tucker and Stone Mountain.
See Farmhouse on Page 15A
Decatur menpreservinghistoric farmhouse inLithonia
 by Andrew Cauthenandrew@dekalbchamp.com
S
ituated on approxi-mately seven acresnear Lithonia, one of DeKalb County’s old-est houses is being preserved.The Housworth-Moseleyfarmhouse, which initially hadtwo rooms, was built around1843 by the Housworth fam-ily who moved into the areain the 1820s. DeKalb Countywas formed in 1822.The Housworth familyowned the house for morethan 160 years.In December 2011, theGeorgia Trust for HistoricPreservation purchased the bank-owned house after itsforeclosure to protect thehouse, which is part of theArabia Mountain NationalHeritage Area and the Klond-ike National Register HistoricDistrict, from demolition andsubdivision.“Such a fine example of an early farm complex is ex-tremely rare in Georgia,” said
Mark C. McDonald
, presi-dent and CEO of The GeorgiaTrust.Founded in 1973, theGeorgia Trust for HistoricPreservation is one of thecountry’s largest statewide,nonprofit preservation organi-zations and works to preserveand enhance Georgia’s com-munities and their historicresources.The Georgia Trust sold thehouse through its EndangeredProperties
 
Revolving Fund program to
Keith Crosby
and
‘Such a fine example of an early farmcomplex is extremely rare in Georgia.’
 – Mark C. McDonald
The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation purchased this 1843 farmhouse after its foreclosure and sold it for $65,000 to twoDecatur men who plan to live in it. The house has several outbuildings on its seven acres and the men have constructed a tempo-rary chicken pen. They plan to operate a small residential farm. Photos by Andrew Cauthen
 
Page 2A The Champion Free Press, Friday, Aug. 17, 2012
Back to School
DeKalb
 
County
 
Foreclosure
 
Prevention
 
and
 
Intervention
 
Workshop
 
Saturday,
 
August
 
18,
 
2012
 
|
 
8
 
AM
 
 –
 
4
 
PM
 
Greater
 
Travelers
 
Rest
 
Baptist
 
Church,
 
H.
 
F.
 
Shepherd
 
Multiplex
 
4650
 
Flat
 
Shoals
 
Parkway,
 
Decatur,
 
GA
 
30034
 
Meet 
 
one
on
one
 
with
 
your 
 
mortgage
 
company 
 
or 
 
a
 
HUD
approved 
 
housing
 
counselor 
 
to
 
 find 
 
options
 
to
 
avoid 
 
 foreclosure
 
For 
 
more
 
information,
 
visit 
 
www.dekalbcountyga.gov 
 
or 
 
www.akataupiomega.com,
 
or 
 
call 
 
404
371
6379.
 
Sponsored
 
by
 
DeKalb
 
County
 
CEO
 
Burrell
 
Ellis
 
DeKalb
 
County
 
Board
 
of 
 
Commissioners
 
Stone
 
Mountain
Lithonia
 
Chapter
 
of 
 
Alpha
 
Kappa
 
Alpha
 
Sorority,
 
Inc.
 
Facing
 
Foreclosure?
 
Need
 
help
 
with
 
your
 
mortgage?
 
IRS
 
Form
 
4506T
EZ
 
and/or
 
last
 
two
 
years
 
of 
 
tax
 
returns
 
Monthly
 
mortgage
 
statement
 
Information
 
about
 
other
 
mortgages
 
on
 
your
 
home,
 
if 
 
applicable
 
Two
 
most
 
recent
 
pay
 
stubs
 
for
 
all
 
household
 
members
 
contributing
 
toward
 
mortgage
 
payment
 
If 
 
self 
 
employed,
 
the
 
most
 
recent
 
quarterly
 
or
 
year
to
date
 
Profit
 
and
 
Loss
 
Statement
 
Documentation
 
of 
 
income
 
you
 
receive
 
from
 
other
 
sources
 
(alimony,
 
child
 
support,
 
social
 
security,
 
etc.)
 
Two
 
most
 
recent
 
bank
 
statements
 
A
 
utility
 
bill
 
showing
 
homeowner
 
name
 
and
 
property
 
address
 
Unemployment
 
insurance
 
letter,
 
if 
 
applicable
 
To
 
better 
 
serve
 
you,
 
homeowners
 
are
 
asked 
 
to
 
bring
 
the
 
 following:
 
Celebrating its second year,the Annie W. Thomas Founda-tion held a Community FunDay/Back to Rally Aug. 4. Itwas one of many such eventsthroughout the county asyoungsters prepared to startthe 2012-13 school year. Therewere games, entertainment,food and distribution of schoolsupplies. The event was held atUPAC – Decatur on Panthers-ville Road in Decatur.
 
Page 3A The Champion Free Press, Friday, Aug. 17, 2012
A sense of place, a sense of tradition
 by Bob Kelley
Part two: A gem rediscovered
 Northwoods rst appeared on theGeorgia Department of Natural Re
-
sources’ radar as part of the DeKalbHistory Center’s DeKalb SingleFamily Residential Post War Devel
-
opment project in 2009.
RichardLaub
, director of the Heritage Preser 
-
vation Program at Georgia State Uni
-
versity, annually requires his graduatestudents who are seeking degrees inhistoric preservation to choose po
-
tential neighborhoods that meet thecriteria for listing on the NationalRegister. He does this as a part of hisstandard curriculum so that studentscan get involved in real life projectsthat they can use with future employ
-
ers. Their success ratio has been phe
-
nomenal, Laub said.In 2010, Laub suggested North
-
woods as a potential project and soonthe GSU students were diligentlyresearching and surveying the area’shomes, schools, parks and relevantstructures, gathering historic blue
-
 prints and vintage photos via sitevisits and resident interviews. Thestudents also enlisted the aid and sup
-
 port of community groups such asthe Northwoods Area NeighborhoodAssociation (NANA) who hostedmeetings, bringing older residentstogether to share valuable rsthandinformation.The biggest obstacle, according toLaub, was getting initial buy-in fromresidents.“It is really a matter of educatingthe residents, addressing their con
-
cerns and diffusing any anxiety or misunderstanding about the programat the very start,” Laub noted. “Wewanted their endorsement before stu
-
dents blindly showed up at their frontdoor asking questions.”There are a number of advantagesto earning a spot on the NationalRegister, according to Laub.“Contrary to popular belief, withthis type of designation there are nostrict architectural guidelines resi
-
dents have to follow,” Laub added.“Beyond the hometown pride thatcomes with this type of designation,there are income tax and property taxadvantages. If you do rehabilitationwork on your property that meets cer 
-
tain National Park Service standards,then a homeowner’s property taxassessment can be frozen for eightyears.”The listing on the National Reg
-
ister is also recognized by the stateDepartment of Transportation whichtakes the designation into consider 
-
ation when embarking on projectssuch as widening roads or buildingnew structures nearby, he said.Many other neighborhoods usethe designation as a regulatory steptoward a bigger picture such as re
-
vamping business corridors and de
-
termining architectural standards.The designation nomination isongoing with at least two more layersof review to take place before the 
-
nal paperwork is sent to Washington,D.C. However, facilitators of the ef 
-
fort are optimistic that every “t” has been crossed and every “i” has beendotted to make the designation a real
-
ity.
A community revitalized
Long before the historic nomina
-
tion was initiated, Northwoods wasexperiencing a renaissance of sorts.Popular for its affordable housingwithin Atlanta’s perimeter, it held agreat attraction to homeowners whohad once been lured into the morerural areas surrounding the city andwho were growing tired of ghtingthe daily trafc streaming into Atlan
-
ta or residing in an urban landscapeof apartments and condominiums.When the prospect of beinglisted on the National Register camealong, it only fueled residents’ de
-
sire to improve their neighborhood.Homeowners started renovating their homes, bringing them back to their 1950s contemporary glam, even go
-
ing so far as to install new mailboxeswith clean lines representative of themid-century style.The mid-century inuence has at
-
tracted new buyers such as
Ben Hen-son
and his partner,
Steve
 
Austin
.“I grew up in Arkansas wherethese types of homes were scarce andI was always drawn to the mid-centu
-
ry style,” Austin recalled.“We were tired of living in a mid
-
town condo and just wanted some
-
thing that wasn’t a concrete box,”Henson added. “We found our 1953home in Northwoods online and wereattracted to the design and scale of the house, the large yard—but not theugly yellow color. One of the rstthings we did was repaint the exterior a more appropriate shade of blue.”Henson and Austin have also com
-
 pleted extensive interior renovationsto their home. They have replaced thecarpet, painted, restored the replaceto its original brick nish and startedfurnishing it with retro-style furni
-
ture. “We want to return the home asclose as we can to its original 1950slook,” Austin noted. “To do this, wehunt for vintage stores, yard sales andany store where we might nd oldfurniture or 1950s kitsch.”
Looking ahead
For Northwoods residents today,the vintage mid-century avor still permeates the neighborhood. Frolick 
-
ing children have been replaced for the most part by health-conscious joggers or residents out for an eve
-
ning stroll. Ardent pet lovers walk their dogs daily past manicured lawnslled with colorful ower beds andthe occasional tranquil water feature.And the promise of historic rec
-
ognition hangs in the air like thetantalizing aroma from a backyard barbecue.
Doraville’s Northwoods neighborhood is a community with a historic past and —if resident and Georgia State University student efforts prevail—a historic future.
Steve Austin, left, and Ben Henson pause in front of their recently purchased mid-century home in Northwoods. The home, circa mid-1950s, is situated on a spacious cor-ner lot in the National Register-nominated subdivision. It was a bright canary yellow when the couple bought it and, to the relief of neighbors, they immediately changed thecolor to French grey. Photo by Bob Kelley

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