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The Development of Kantian Thought Vleeschauwer

The Development of Kantian Thought Vleeschauwer

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THOMAS
NELSON
ANDSONS
LTD
ParksideWorks
Edinburgh
936
Park
Street
London
WI
I
17
Latrobe
StreetMelbourne
Cl
302-304Barclays
Bank
BuildingCommissioner
and
Kruis
Streets
Johannesburg
THOMAS
NELSON
AND
SONS
(CANADA)
LTD
91-93Wellington
Street
West
Toronto
I
THOMAS
l " ~ E L S O N
ANDSONS
18
East41stStreet
New
York17,N.Y.
SOCIETE
FRANQAISE
n'EnITIONS
NELSON
97
rue
Monge
Paris5Originallypublishedas
L'
Evolution
defa
pensee
Kantienne
PressesUniversitaires
de
France,1939Englishtranslation
©
A.
R.
C.
Duncan
1962
 
Author's
Preface
This
bookis
not
an
originalwork
in
the
strictsense
ofthat
term.
Between
1934
and
1937
I
published
an
extensive
study
of
the
Critical
philosophy
under
thegeneral
title
of
LaDiduction
transcendantale
dans
l'
CEuvre
de
Kant.
This
three-volumework
had
a
dual
purpose.First,
it
was
intended
tooffera
textual
commentary
on
that
part
of
the
Critique
of
Pure
Reason
known
as
theTranscendentalDeduction
of
the
Cate-gories.Secondly,
it
sought
to
tracethe
development
of
the
whole
Critical
problem
which
comestoa
centralpoint
in
theTranscendental
Deduction.
The
kind
receptionaccordedtothis
work
made
it
impossiblefor
me
toignore
the
suggestion
made
by
severalcolleagues
that
I
shouldgiveageneral
account
of
the
evolution
of
Kantian
thought.
The
use
of
the
historical
method
makes
an
author
cautious
about
apriori
schemas
in
anyattempt
to
determine
historical
reality;
it
alsoforbids
him
to
beguided
in
hisresearches
byany
preconceived
idea
of
thenature
of
the
Criticalphilosophy.
An
almostreligiousrespectfor
thedocumentary
evidence
is
for
the
historiana
matter
of
pro-fessionalduty.Twelveyears
devoted
to
thestudy
of
the
Kantian
corpus,to
thecomparison
of
Kant's
letters
with
hispublishedworks,tocautioususe
of
his
Nachlass,
to
inquiry
intothe
cultural
state
of
Germany
in
the
eighteenth
century,constitutedapowerfuldefence
against
any
temptation
to
a
priorism.
Closepersonal
study
of
the
facts
led
the
writer
to
pay
attention
to
the
lesson
of
the
factsthemselves.
From
my
willingacceptance
of
the
demands
of
tIlehistorical
method
hascomea
new
conception
of
someaspects
of
Kant's
intellectual
career,
and
consequently
I
havebeen
forced
to
contradict
some
of
the
criticalclichesto
be
found
in
many
of
the
textbooks.
The
interest
in
the
exactsciel1cesshown
by
Kantat
thebeginning
of
his
careerno
longer
appearstohave
the
mysterious
and
revealingcllaracter
commonly
attributed
toit.
The
recognition
of
theadmir-
able
unity
which
canbetraced
in
Kant's
thought,
in
spite
of
vii
 
AUTHOR'SPREFACE
frequent
deviations
in
the
solution
of
specialproblems,springs
directlyfrom
arutWessrejection
of
the
Hegelian
kind
of
interpretation
typified
by
Kuna
Fischer.
My
emphasis
on
theimportance
of
the
psychology
of
Tetens
in
thestructure
ofth.e
Critical
philosopllY
may
also
be
attributed
to
my
use
of
the
historical
method.
The
same
method
led
me
to
the
paradoxical,
but
none
the
less
true,
view
that
the
second
edition
of
the
Critique
is
not
a
reaction
against
idealism
itself,
but
a
reaction
against
the
subjectivity
inherentin
someforms
of
idealism,
whichled
Kant
to
a
gradual
reinforcement
of
his
own
idealism
by
a
more
and
more
pronounced
constructivism.
My
atten1pt
to
deal
withthevaried
fortunes
of
the
Kantian
systen1,itsreception
both
by
]1is
disciples
and
hisopponents,
and
my
inclusion
of
a
consideration
of
the
Opus
Postumum
in
the
story
of
hisdevelop-
ment,
arethe
natural
outcome
of
myadoption
of
the
:historical
method.
I
am
personallyconvinced
that
the
account
of
Kant's
intellectuallife,
which
I
offer
in
this
book,
owes
what
accuracy
it
has
to
the
methodological
principlesemployed
in
it.
The
reader
must
judge
for
himself
to
what
extent
I
am
correct
inthis
opinion.
For
myself
I
can
onlyexpress
my
personal
conviction.
I
certainly
do
not
claim
tohave
saidthe
last
\vord
in
this
matter-very
farfrom
it.
My
earlier
work,despiteitssize
and
the
austere
nature
of
theargument,
wasgiven
a
favourable
reception
by
the
philo-sophical
public.
This
leads
me
to
believe
that,
after
a
period
of
Kantian
philology
which
has
been
the
source
of
a
multitude
of
specialstudies,
mycommentary
served
a
useful
purpose
and
indeed
came
at
an
opportune
moment.
The
present
work
is
a
gesture
of
gratitude
in
response
to
this
sympathetic
reception
of
my
commentary
and
is
intended
to
give
my
readers
wllat
they
themselves
have
askedfor.
Noone
need
look
in
tIlesepagesfor
a
closeexposition
of
theCritical
teaching
or
for
any
detailedexplanation
of
obscurepassages.
I
am
not
writing
asaphilosopher.
My
purposeis
more
modest.
I
should
liketo
be
consideredas
the
historian
of
a
great
system
and
thebiographer
of
a
greatmind.
I
have
deliberately
r e f r a i : r ; . ~ d
from
any
attempt
to
turn
Vlli

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