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Microvita and the Euro-Zone Crisis

Microvita and the Euro-Zone Crisis

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Microvita and the Euro-zone crisis
In social life, Yaks’a Devayonis (strengthening the interest in accumulating money, originally for a good purpose) and Pisha’ca Pretayonis (bringing about that everything is considered as an object of enjoyment) are of special interest (1), insofar as they refer to the antinomy of puritanism versus hedonism, particularly in the sense that puritanism strongly influences the development of capitalism (Max Weber), whereas hedonism becomes common in affluent societ
Microvita and the Euro-zone crisis
In social life, Yaks’a Devayonis (strengthening the interest in accumulating money, originally for a good purpose) and Pisha’ca Pretayonis (bringing about that everything is considered as an object of enjoyment) are of special interest (1), insofar as they refer to the antinomy of puritanism versus hedonism, particularly in the sense that puritanism strongly influences the development of capitalism (Max Weber), whereas hedonism becomes common in affluent societ

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Published by: Dr. Hans-Joachim Rudolph on Aug 26, 2012
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Microvita and the Euro-Zone Crisis
by Dr. Hans-Joachim Rudolph (MD), Microvita Research e.V.In social life,
 Yaks’a
Devayonis (strengthening the interest inaccumulating money, originally for a good purpose) and
Pisha’ca
Pretayonis (bringing about that everything is considered as anobject of enjoyment) are of special interest (1), insofar as they referto the antinomy of puritanism versus hedonism, particularly in thesense that puritanism strongly influences the development of capitalism (Max Weber), whereas hedonism becomes common inaffluent societies, arising, among other reasons, from such workethics.Corresponding to my previous publications (2,3), the antinomy of  puritanism and hedonism can be understood as an oxymoron, whichis transformed into its polarities by the action of the appertainingneutral, positive or negative microvita respectively. Societies withan excess of interest in collecting and accumulating money willconsume more
 Yaks’a
Devayonis, whereas societies mostlyconsidering everything as an object of enjoyment will consumemore
Pisha’ca
Pretayonis. The appertaining neutral microvitum willproduce both of them in equal amounts, resulting in a socialbalance between puritanism and hedonism.Such balanced states are, however, necessarily unstable, as both,puritanism and hedonism, do have strong tendencies to go waybeyond themselves: The accumulated wealth wants to be spent forthe worship of idols* (Prakrtiliina), for objects of physical or mentalbeauty (Kinnara or Vidya’dhara) or for music (GandharvaDevayonis). And the tendency to consider everything as an objectof enjoyment brings about restlessness (Madhyakapa’la), atendency towards suicide (Kabandha) or towards involving others inmental conflicts or to use the intellect for their suppression(Durmukha or Brahmadaetya Pretayonis). Therefore, such balancedstates can exist only temporarily.Moreover, extremely unbalanced states are unfolding these days infront of our eyes: The Euro-zone is a good example; and thequestion at hand is, how to navigate in such complex fields, or infact, how to influence the related psychic forces?
 
Now, in order to have a better understanding of hedonism, wemight take a look at the classic schools of antiquity. There we findthat the first hedonist school of thought arose in Indiaapproximately 500 BCE. It was called Carvaka, and maintained thatthe Hindu scriptures are false, that the priests are liars, that there isno afterlife, and that pleasure should be the aim of living. Unlikeother Indian schools of philosophy, the Carvakas argued that thereis nothing wrong with sensual indulgence. The earliest of such statements is preserved from the Ramayana,Ayodhya kanda, chapter 108, where Jabali tries to persuade Ramato accept the kingdom by using nastika arguments (4):O, the highly wise! Arrive at a conclusion, therefore, that there isnothing beyond this Universe. Give precedence to that which meetsthe eye and turn your back on what is beyond our knowledge.(2.108.17)Likewise, Amartya Sen said in an interview with Pranab Bardhan,published by the California Magazine, July–August 2006:In some ways people had got used to the idea that India wasspiritual and religion-oriented. That gave a leg up to the religiousinterpretation of India, despite the fact that Sanskrit had a largeratheistic literature than what exists in any other classical language.Madhava Acharya, the remarkable 14th century philosopher, wrotethis rather great book called Sarvadarshansamgraha, whichdiscussed all the religious schools of thought within the Hindustructure. The first chapter is Atheism” – a very strong presentationof the argument in favor of atheism and materialism.In India, the strongest opposer of Carvaka was,however, Shankaracharya (eighth century CE). In one of the versesof his famous Sanskrit poem Vivekachudamani, he says (5):BRAHMA SAT YAM JAGAT MITHYA, JIVO BRAHMAIVA NAPARAH —Brahman is the only truth, the world is unreal, and there isultimately no difference between Brahman and individual self.
 
So, the one (Carvakas) maintain that only the world is real and weshould turn your back on what is beyond our knowledge. And theother (Shankaracharya) maintains that only Brahma is real and weshould turn our back to that which meets the eye (the world).Consequently, philosophers are divided into two broad schools inreference to the question about the nature of the external Universe:Nominalism and Idealism.Here, Prabhat Rainjan Sarkar finds a synthesis, bridging what usedto be insurmountable by occidental and oriental philosophy, as hesays in Ananda Sutram 2/14 (6):BRAHMA SAT YAM JAGADAPI SATYAM A’PEKS’IKAM —Brahma is absolute Truth, the Universe is also Truth, but relative Truth.On the other hand, if we say that
 Yaks’a
strengthens in a personthe interest in collecting and accumulating money, originally for agood purpose – then, what does that good purpose actually mean?For Puritans, the answer was clear: They believed that seculargovernors are accountable to God to protect and reward virtue,including “true religion”, and to punish wrongdoers. They believedthat man existed for the glory of God; that his first concern in lifewas to do God’s will and so to receive
future
happiness (7).Now, with respect to the mentioned imbalance of puritanism andhedonism, we may recall Ac. Vimalananda Avadhuta‘s articleentitled “Prama’ – The Cosmic Principle maintaining stable balancein the Universe” (8). There he writes: Prama’ means equilibrium +equipoise. Equilibrium denotes being perfectly balancedAperfect state of balance will be established between individuals andthe collectivity and between the collectivity and the cosmos. Thissupreme balance in all spheres will bring a perfect state of Prama’everywhere. The society will attain PramaSamvrddhi in thephysical stratum, Prama’ Rddhi in the psychic stratum and Prama’Siddhi in the spiritual stratum. That will be the stage of all-round

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