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Coast Artillery Journal - Oct 1927

Coast Artillery Journal - Oct 1927

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Published by CAP History Library
Army
Army

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: CAP History Library on Aug 26, 2012
Copyright:Public Domain

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11/17/2013

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THE
COAST ARTILLERY JOURNAL
Published as the Journal U.S. Artillery from
1892
to
1922
MAJOR ROBERT ARTHUR, C. A. C.FIRST LIEUT. JAMES
L.
WHELCHEL, C. A. C.
 Editor and Manager  Assistant Edito
Volume 67
OCTOBER, 1927
CONTENTS
Number 4
U. S. S. RELIEF ......
.... Frontispiece
THE BEGINNINGS OF COAST FORTIFICATIONS ....281
 By
EDGAR
B.
WESLEYADJUSTMENT OF ANTIAIRCRAFT FIRE ....291
 By
CAPTAIN GORDON
B.
WELCHSECOND BATTLE OF BULL RUN ...........302
 By
COMMITTEENo.1,
Coast ArtWery School,
1926.27 
TROOP SCHOOLS IN THE COAST ARTILLERY CORPS .. 334
 By
CAPTAIN C.
E.
BR,\ND
.
,
. . . . . . . . .
THE 244TH COAST ARTILLERY (9TH REGIMENT, N. Y.)EDITORIAL .
The Blue Uniform-Personnel Situation.
.347
. 353.PROFESSIONAL NOTES ..357
Sixty-Third CoastArtillery (Antiaircraft}-United States Crusiers-Direcand Indirect Fire of CoastArtillery-The Necessity of Unity of Supreme Leadership for Success in War-Antiaircraft Materiel Ready for Test- European Subsistence in Case of IVar-C. M. T. C.Camp, Fort Monroe,
Va.
COAST ARTILLERY BOARD NOTESBOOK REVIEWS
Fi1;eYears in Turkey-Nations and Navies. Authors alone are responsible for statements in contributed articles
.367
• 372
Published monthly nnder the
snpenision
of the Commandant, Coast Artillery School,. by direction
of the Chief of Coast Artillery, for the information of the Coast Artillery personnel of the Regular
Army, Na.tional Guard, and Organized Reserves. ..
Terms: Lnited States,
$3..
00 a year; single copies, 50 cents .. Canada, $3.25 a year; single copieS's.
55
cents ..
Foreign, $3.50 a year; single copies, 60 cents..
Entered as second -class matter at the Post Office at Fortress Monroe, Ya... Acceptance for mailing.at
~ecial
rate of postage proYided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized May 8, 1920.
CopJrigbt, 1927,.
by
the COAST .Ann.r.ny JODL"UL.
Addresa: The
COAST Alrr:rr.I.nY JOI::L"UL,
Fort Monroe, Va..
 
-
. .
 I 
!.
 
THE COAST ARTILLERY JOURNAL
Volume 67
OCTOBER, 1927
Number 4
The Beginnings of Coast Fortifications
 By
EDGAR
B.
WESLEY
T
HE general policy of unpreparedness which prevailed throughoutthe first decades of the United States is well exemplified in thetardy and feeble growth of coast fortifications. Fortunately the Revo-lution terminated successfully for the colonists, but they failed to learnthe lesson of national defense. The army was disbanded, and the hap-piest delusions of reliance upon the militia took the place of prepara-tions. The scanty navy completely disappeared, and was replaced bya blissful trust in isolation. The remains of Revolutionary fortifica-tions crumbled into ruins, and the colonists solaced themselves withthe notion of their ineffectiveness.The series of international crises produced sporadic bursts of en-thusiasm for preparedness but did not result in the establishment oany sustained policy of national defense. The army grew tremendously.onpaper, but in actuality it increased very slowly. A navy was pro-posed and voted whenever danger seemed imminent, but in reality fewships were constructed. '!'hesame lack of a consistent policy prevailedin the matter of coast fortifications, but some were erected, and theirbeginnings are worthy of study.During the Critical Period no attempt wasmade to fortify the coast,and the first years of Washington's administration were equally barrenof results. In his Third Annual Address on October 25,
1791,
Wash-ington urged Congress to consider "the fortification of such places asare peculiarly important and vulnerable,"1 but this recommendation,like many other valuable suggestions of our first president, fell uponan unresponsive group of politicans, immoderately jealous of theirsupposed right and liberties. Kothing was done until
1794. On
Feb-
ruary
28 of that year a House committee recommended the followingfortifications, garrisons, and cannon:
lRichard50n.,
Jlessa&esllnd PUpl!TSof the Presidents,
I, 101.
[281]

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