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Coast Artillery Journal - Mar 1928

Coast Artillery Journal - Mar 1928

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Published by CAP History Library
Army
Army

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: CAP History Library on Aug 27, 2012
Copyright:Public Domain

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01/31/2013

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THE COAST ARTILLERY JOURNAL
Published as the Journal U.S. Artillery from
1892
to 1922
MAJOR ROBERT ARTHUR, C. A. C.FIRST LIEUT. JAMES L. WHELCHEL, C. A. C..
 Editor and Manager  Assistant Edito
Volume 68
{J.
S. S. WYOMINGANTIAIRCRAFT SPOTTING
MARCH, 1928
CONTENTS
Number 3
... Frontispiece
 By
CAPT. C. E. BRAND 199THE ANTIETAM CAMPAIGN ..... 209
 By
MAJORS WELSHMER, MOORE, WILDRICK, AND SEYDELOUR MERCHANT MARINE ...
. By
MAJ. F. L. HOSKINS 229THE MILITARY SITUATION OF CANADA .
By
LIEUT. P. W. GEORGE 239GENERAL SCOTT'S LANDING AT VERA CRUZ .... 244
 By
MAJ. H. W. T. EGLINCOAST FORTS OF COLONIAL RHODE ISLAND 248PROFESSIONAL NOTES 257
The 59th Coast Artillery (TrDr)-Private Frank G. Peterson--BatteryOfficersShoot Down Sleeve Target-The Disarmament Question--Con-quering the World Before Thirty-Brigadiers-Face Powder and GunPowder-New Antiaircraft Gun--40th Division Reunion-Officers on Detached Service.
COAST ARTILLERY BOARD NOTES 271BOOK REVIEWS ..... 272.
Peace or War-All the World's AiTships-Taschen' buch der kriegs flotten-The Conquest of the Air-The Outline of Man's Knowledge-Photography, Its Principles and Practice-The Silent Force-TheThundrer. Authors alone are responsible for stat"ments in contributed articles
Published monthly under the supervision of the Commandant,. Coast Artillery
Schoo~
by direction
of the Chief of Coast Artillery, for the informatioa of the COa!ltArtillery personnel of the Regular
Army,
National Guard, and Organized Reserves.
Terms: United States, $3.00 a year; single copies, 50 cents. Canada, $3.25 a year; single copies,55
cents.
Foreign, $3.50
B.
year; single copies, 60 cents.
Entered as see:ond class matter at the Post Office at Fortress Monroe, Va. Acceptance for mailing at
.pecial rate of postage provided for
in
Section
1103~
Am: of October 3, 1917, authorized
Ma.y
8,
1920.
Copyright, 1927,
by
the COAST AxTILLlmY JoUBNAL.
Address: The
COAST .AB.TILI..EliY
Jomt..~.AL,
Fort Monroe, Va:.
 Printed 
by
HOUSTON PRINTING AND
PL"ELISHING
HOUSE ..
Hampton, Va.
 
THE COAST ARTILLERY JOURNAL
Volume68
MARCH, 1928
Antiaircraft Spotting
 By
CAPTAIN C.
E.
BRAND, C.
A.
C.
First Prize, Annual Prize Essay Contes
Number 3
T
HE comparatively recent experimental determination of the effec-tive danger space of the antiaircraft shell burst in flight has placedthe determination of "hits" for antiaircraft gun fire upon a sound basisof fact which is very comforting to battery commanders and reassuringto the entire service. The hypothetical target-area based upon thisexperimentally determined danger space has, moreover, a symmetrywithregard to the line of fire which should greatly simplify the deter-mination of hits and the observations therefor. Although the systemof observation and computation of hits contemplated by the regulationsweredevisedfor the former semi-cubical target-area, and are thereforesomewhat antiquated, the commendable latitude in training methodsallowedorganizations in this development stage af antiaircraft artilleryhas permitted the development and adaptation to the problem of agreatly simplified system of spotting. This. system, which it is thepurpose of this paper to describe, utilizes the symmetry of the hypothe-tical target to reduce the number of observations to be made andmatchedin determining hits, from three for each shot to two for eachshot. In doing this it greatly simplifies the two remaining observationsand removes the
necessity
for matching observations at all, which isthe greatest single source of error.The great difficulties which attend the spotting of antiaircraft fireare well known to everyone in the antiaircraft service. They may
he
divided into two.classes: (1) inaccuracies of measurements of devia-ti~ns, and (2) difficulty of matching observed deviations. Whereasthe former permit wide variations as to the number of hits reported
in
a given shoot, according to the skill and care of the observers, thelatter, degenerating into a juggling contest among the several batteries,permitssuchwideand questionable latitude of choicethat many batterycommanders have come to consider the highest score as evidence of "the biggest liar," as it is sometimes rather inelegantly expressed
in
[199]

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