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Fisher's Ghost

Fisher's Ghost

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Published by draculavanhelsing
Singleton Argus 1909 (Dec 18)
Singleton Argus 1909 (Dec 18)

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Published by: draculavanhelsing on Aug 28, 2012
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Singleton Argus (NSW : 1880 - 1954) , Saturday 18 December 1909, page 2National Library of Australiahttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article76908890
EARLYAUSTRALIA.
EXCITINGEVENTS
INITS
HISTORY.
~(Written
for
the
Singleton
Argus).
THE
FIStLEKOliOST
MYSTERY.
The
Fisher
ghostmysteryprobablyprovoked
more
widespread
interest,
and
led
to
greaternewspaper
?-
controversythan
anyother
Incidentassociatedwith
early
Australian
history.
FrederickFisher
wastheson
of
highlyrespectableparents
In
England,
but
hadnever
exhibited
anyofhis
progenitors'goodqualities,
and
at
an
early
agewas
transported
to
BotanyBay
toranoffenceofnovery
serious
nature.
His
relatives,enraged
at
thedisgracelie
had
brought
on
them,disownedhim
from
that
day,
andFisherlandedin-Australiasurrounded
by
every
thing
undesirable,
andwithout
a
friendInthe
world.
The
demoralising
Influence
of
the
example
setbythosewithwhom
he.
had
to
associate
toldits
tale,andhebegan
to
indulge
in
strongdrink.After
a
time
hesucceeded,in
gaining
his
ticket-of-leave,audlaten.
'on
obtained
a
grantof'
a
townallotment
at
Canipbelltown,
andcommencedbusi
nessin
a
dual
capacity
,of
shopkeeper
andfarmer.For
a.
time
tilingswentwell"'with
him,
butIn
the
eveningshis
time
hungheavy,andhis
own
fireside
presented
no
attractions
to
him,
andhe
flew
for-
refugefrom
unpleasant
recollec
tions,
and
the
loneliness
ofhis
dismalhome,
to
the
public-houses
at
Campbell
town,
and
sought
relleS
in
theflowing
The'
necessaryconsequences
of
conduct
'
such
as
this
soonbecame
apparent.
Hisbusiness:
was
neglected,
but
Instead
or
endeavouring,
byexertion,
to
extricatehimself
from
thedifficultieswhich-surrounded
him,
he
plunged
deeper
into
a
life
of
dissipation,frequenting
the
pur
lieusof
the
Canipbelltown
hotels-
bothnightand-day.illsinevitableruinbe
cameso
apparent
that
hiscreditors
re
solved
torealise
on
the
fast
disappearing
-assets,
and
Fisher,
wasarrested
for
debt,
and
lodged
In
gaol.'The
Only-per
sonIn
whomhe
appeared
to
place
any
eonfldence
wasaman
named
Wqrnu,
whom-he
"engaged
as
a
sort
ofoverseer
"on
hisfarm.
When
thenewsof
Fisher
s-
arrest'
for
debt
was"
circulated,
Worral
interviewedhim,
and
suggested-the
ex
pediencyof
entering
into
a.
scheme
to
defraud
his
creditors,bymaking
overto
r
him
(Worral)
thewholeofhis
property
which
yetremained;
at
the
sametlmo
agreeing
to
enter
intoa
bond
thatIt
would
be
restored
to
him
onhis
releasefrom-
gaoL.
Fisher
for
a
timerefusedto
countenanceWorral's
suggestion,,
and
stated
that
ho
thought
his
creditors
should'receive
their
own,
andfurther
ex
??-
pressed
the
opinion
thatatthepace
lief
?was-golng
it
would
belittle
use
him
try
ing'to
retain
tho
property.
Worral
persisted
inhiseffortsto
defeatthecreditors,-and
-at
lastFisher
agreed
to
hisproposal,and
two
separate
deeds
weredrawnup,one
handing
all
Fisher
sproperty-overto
Worral,
and
the
other
wasan
agreement
that
Worral
would
return
'
the
sameto
Flshor
on
demand.
,
The-creditorwho
had
Fisher
Imprisoned
for
debt,
on
findinghecould
notrecoverhismoney,
decidedthat
it
wouldbeunwise
policy
to
keep
Fisher
imprisoned,
andarrangedforhisrelease,withtheresultthatFisheralmost
immediately
returned
to
his
property.
Worral
was
now
exer
-?clsingall
his
ingenuity
astohowlie
couldobtainthodocument
in
Ushers
.
possession.
In
which
he
agreed
tohand
Back
all
the
property
atdemand.About
a
weekafterFisher'srelease
'
fromprison,helefthishouse,and
as
hedidnot
return
thefollowing
morning
littlenotice
was
takenofhisabsence,
as
it
was
thought
he
lia'd
gone
toone
ofthe
"?pubs,"
and
was
either
helplesslydrunk,
awas
"?pubs,"
and
was
either
helplesslydrunk,
orin
gaol,
but
as
theday.
wore
on,
a
neighbour
went
to
Inquire
atthe
varioushotels
if
hehadvisited
_any
ofthem.
All"inquiries
failed
to
elicit
anything
to
indicatehiswhereabouts.That,
night?Worral
returnedfrom
Sydney,
andin
formedthe
Inquisitive
inhabitantsthathehad
accompanied
wisher
to[Sydney
the
previousnight,
and
thatthe
latter
?
hadthatday
takenhis
departure
for
England.Everyone
was.
satisfiedwiththetruth,ofthestatement,
as
It
was
well-Known
that
a
ship
had
left
Sydney
that-dayforthe
!'old
country."
Worral
then
took
up
undisputed
possession
of
Fisher's
property,
and
.
whenever
li
s
righttoit
was
questioned,
he
was
ab
e
to
produce
theconveyancewhichmattethe
property
overto
himthe
con
spiracy
to
dofeatthecreditors
wasin
stituted.
Timeworeon,
and
namewas
almostforgotten,
except
bythedeludedcreditors.
-
„„,,,.,.Some
weekslater,MrandMrs
Jiulej,
weir-knownresidents
of
the
locality,
"wereone
night
returning
hometothen
farm
along
the
Campbelltown-road
-They
left
Campoelltownabout
10
o
clocK,
tne
moonThau
risen,butitsbrilliance
was
obscuredbyclouds.They
were
driving,
andhad
Just
passed
Flshei-s
house
when
Farley
observedtheligure
ofaman
sitting
on
the
fence
on
the
same
sideof
the
road
asthehouse.
On
approach
ingnearer?
he
recognised
Fisher,whomhe
S
thought
was
then
onthe
high
seasenrouteto
England.
Thehorse
liewas
driving
becamerestiveandtrembledviolently.Farleythenmade
an
effort
Xoapproach
the
ligure,
so
thathe
cou
d
assure
himselfthat
hewasnot
mistaken,
or:
deceived
by
a
fanciedresemblance.The
ghastly'appearance
which
thefea,-tures
presented
to
hisview
on
his
near?
approach
su'uck
such
a
.chill
ofhorror
n
himselfand.hiswifethatthey
were
,
speTchless,
Theligurethen
rose,
fromthefence,
and,
wavingits
right
aim,
pointed
in
the
*
direction
of
a
small
dry
~r
Ml
tthatran
through
the
puddocK.
Farieyandhiswifewatchedtheligure
which
keptalongthecreek
bank,
and
followedf
the
windings
ofthestream.Itthen
suddenly
disappeared,
fromview.
Theterror
which
overpowered
larleyandIds
wife,
atthe
sight,
defiesallpowerof
.description.
How
theyreached
home
thdt
night
theydidnot
know.M<>-et
mornlns
Farley
went
toFishershouse
expecting
toAndhimathome,
andlearn
of
some
startling
experience
he
hadgone
through,
as
indicated
by
hisaDDearanceon
the
previousnight.
On
?iSSSSn.'at-U.o
door,-WorraPo?
out,
and
Farleyinquired
If???rnturned
home,
ashe
had
seenhimsit.
?ng
on
the
fence
the
previous.night.
Worral
laughed,
and
said,-Why,
man,hehasbeen
on
the
high
seastholastbW
weeks,andIs
on
his
wayto
Eii?
laid."
ThatdayFarley
was
struck
damn'
withdelirium,andrenmned
un
conscious
for
ninedays.Ontheninthday
hewas
quiterestored
to
health,
andasked'thosearoundhimtoaend
„„
fol
-,>"?
PoliceMagistrate.
Amessengerthen
went
out,and
returned
with
Mr
WilliamHowe,
Superintendent
ofPoliceat
Campbelltown.
TohimFarleymade
a
statement,Inwhichhesaidthat
liewas
fullyconvincedthatFisher
had
met
with
foul
play.
As
soonas
Farley
was
ableto
leave
his
bed,
Howe,
occom
naniedby
a
couple
of
constablesand
a
Slack
tractornamed
Gilbert,
werecon
ductedby
Farley
to
tho
scene
oftho
ap
parition.
Whentheyreached
the.spot
theblacktrackerwent
upto
a
panelpi
fencewhich
was
stained,
and
smelt
it.
andthencut
a
piece
off
the
.'all
andtasted
it.
and
pronounced
thestainas
??whitemart's
blood."
FarleythentoldEtowethatthestained
panel
was
the
one
on
whichthe
ligure
sat.Thetracketthen
Jumped
thefence,andfollowed
In
exactlythefootsteps
of
theligure-on
the
night
ofthe
apparition,
and
continued
alfng
thewindingcwak
just
w.form
appeared
todowhen
parley
witnessed
the
vision..AtlengthGilbert
cametoa
pool
on
whichthere
appeared

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