Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
When workplace bullying takes place in an organisation, it is because the leadership and management of the organisation allow it to happen. Do you agree?

When workplace bullying takes place in an organisation, it is because the leadership and management of the organisation allow it to happen. Do you agree?

Ratings: (0)|Views: 92 |Likes:
An essay for the 2011 Undergraduate Awards Competition by Daniel McGrath. Originally submitted for Human Resource Management at Trinity College, Dublin, with lecturer Ms. Mary Keating in the category of Business & Economics
An essay for the 2011 Undergraduate Awards Competition by Daniel McGrath. Originally submitted for Human Resource Management at Trinity College, Dublin, with lecturer Ms. Mary Keating in the category of Business & Economics

More info:

Published by: Undergraduate Awards on Aug 29, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
See more
See less

10/27/2013

 
1
When workplace bullying takes place in an organisation, it is because the leadershipand management of the organisation allow it to happen. Do you agree?
 Introduction
Workplace bullying is undoubtedly a common occurrence in all manners of organisationsworldwide. Some studies have shown that up to 10.6% of workers feel that they have beenvictims of workplace bullying
(Hoel et al. 2001, Einarsen et al. 1996, O‟Connell et al. 2001,
Lutgen-Sandvik et al. 2007). Three factors are recognised for causing this phenomenon;individual, interpersonal and organisational levels of bullying. I believe that theorganisational level is the most important, and has the most impact on workplace bullying. Aview shared by Harvey et al. (2006). It is because of this that I
 agree
 
with Needham‟s (2003)
statement that workplace bullying takes place because leadership and management allow it tohappen. Organisations must own bullying and harassment as an organisational problem ratherthan between individuals (Rayner, 1997). I believe that there are two major areas that impact
on workplace bullying within the organisational level. First of all, a company‟s culture, it‟s
accepted practices and procedures, and, its working environment, all contribute to the rolebullying plays in any organisation. Secondly, globalisation has influenced the level of competition in international business. This has put added pressure on every organisation,including its managers and subordinates, to get results. In this essay I will discuss thesepoints further. I will also outline reasons behind my failure to
disagree
with the statementabove. First of all however, I will give a brief introduction on the development of workplacebullying as an area of study, as well as a definition for the term.
 
2
Workplace Bullying
Workplace bullying emerged as an area of study during the 1980s. Leymann (1985) firstpursued this area and performed a number of studies around various worker traumas. As aresult of his work Sweden became the first country to introduce anti-bullying legislation forthe workplace in 1994 (Anonymous A). Einarsen (2003, p.15) provides an accurate definitionof what workplace bullying actually is
 – 
 
“Bullying at work means harassing, offending, socially excluding someone, or negatively affecting someone‟s work tasks. In order for the label bullying to be applied to a
particular activity, interaction or process it has to occur repeatedly and regularly (e.g. weekly)over a period of time (e.g. six months). Bullying is an escalating process in the course of which the person confronted ends up in an inferior position and becomes the target of systematic negative social acts. A conflict cannot be called bullying if the incident is anisolated event or if two parties of approximately
equal „strength‟ are in conflict”.
Workplace bullying is now recognised as a major occupational stressor, creating enormousfinancial and legal implications for organisations (Arnold et al. 2010). These implicationsinclude absence due to sickness, disruptions from staff leaving, the costs involved insearching for, recruiting and training new staff, lowered morale, and the reputation damagethe company will suffer. Google and Australian retail firm Sunbury are just some of thethousands of firms whose reputations have suffered because of bullying claims (Connolly2004, Schneiders 2010). It is therefore in their benefit for organisations to address workplacebullying not only before it gets out of hand, but before it can even begin.
 
3
Organisational Culture
Having provided contextual value regarding the study of bullying, I will now explore theimportance of organisational culture in this regard. The culture of an organisation plays acrucial role in combating workplace bullying. Culture forms the basis of group identity andshared thoughts, beliefs, and feelings. One of the most important functions of leaders
 – 
 particularly the founders of a company
 – 
is the creation and management of its culture(Christensen, 2006). Ultimately, the attitudes and beliefs of leadership in an organisationdetermine the psychological climate of an institution
 – 
the ethos or culture of that institution(Adams, 1992). Schein (1998) describes organisational culture as a pattern of basicassumptions
 – 
invented, discovered, or developed by a given group as it learns to cope withthe problems of external adaptation and internal integration
 – 
that has worked well enough tobe considered valid and, therefore, to be taught to new members as the correct way toperceive, think, and feel in relation to those problems. Strong organisational cultures becomeinternalised within its employees. (Zaleznick et al. 1992, Soeters et al. 1988). If an
organisation‟s culture is one where anti
-bullying practices are not in place, the result willalmost inevitably be a workplace that is, at its worst, rife with bullying. In effect, this isnegative leadership (Ashforth, 1994). It is up to the employer to take the initiative and beproactive by developing a culture and systems whereby it is able to identify whether bullyingexists or whether it has the potential to exist within the organization (Camilleri, 2010). If acompany creates a culture where bullying is not tolerated, the company will almost definitelyreap the rewards. At this organisational level, it is quite easy to see that without the formationof anti-
 bullying practices within a company‟s culture, it is only right that leadership and
management are blamed for allowing workplace bullying to take place in an organisation.Christensen (2006, p.8) sums up the importance of a strong organisational culture quite well
 – 
 

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->