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Table Of Contents

Introduction
AAntony,‘Father ofmonks’—and Father of Solitaries
1.His place in history
2.The spiritual battle
BAthanasius the biographer,Evagrius the translator
CThe Life
1.First beginnings
2.Christians in the political world ofthe 3rd century
2.The first Christian solitaries
3.The hermits ofthe desert
4.The cenobites,Pachomius etc
E The Way ofthe Desert
1.Celibacy,manual labour,fastings and vigils
2.Visions,demons and angels
Chronological Table
Prologue ofEvagrius to Innocent
Bishop Athanasius to his pilgrim brothers1
Solitude near the village
First temptations ofthe devil
A stricter rule
Departure to the tombs and more severe testing
Departure to the deserted fort in the desert
Emergence from the fort
His teaching to his followers:(a) ascetic discipline
His teaching:(b) War against the demons
His teaching:(c) Demonic deceits
His teaching:(d) Description ofhis own battles against the demons
The beginning ofthe ‘peopling ofthe desert’
Antony visits in prison the victims ofMaximian’s persecution
The cure ofMartinius’daughter
Departure to the inner desert
Further battles with the devil
Miracles and healings
Counsel to those who came to him
More healings and miracles
His spiritual insights
His condemnation ofthe Arians and his preaching in Alexandria
He refutes the pagan philosophers
Consulted by the Emperor
Visions ofthe future
Counsellings and prophecies
The manner ofhis death
Epilogue ofEvagrius, the translator from Greek to Latin
P. 1
Vitae Patrum

Vitae Patrum

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Athanasius' Life of Antony is not a biography in the modern sense of the word. It is more in the nature of a hagiography, a 'writing of holiness', in accordance with the conventions of the time. Athanasius was bishop of Alexandria from 328–373 and was well acquainted with this extraordinary person called Antony who from the age of about twenty went off by himself to live in the Egyptian desert, which was considered to be the dwelling place of wild beasts and demons, and where a person could seek to serve God in the absence of all secular distractions. People followed him out to the desert to learn from him, and so began what Athanasius called the 'peopling of the desert'. Antony died in 356 at the age of 105, and Athanasius wrote this celebration of his life soon afterwards. It has had an enormous influence in the history of Christianity throughout the ages, so that Antony is often known as the 'Father of Monks'. But the word 'monk' comes from monos, 'alone'. Antony was never a monk as we understand the word today, but 'solitary' he certainly was. And there is much in his teaching which is still valid for the individual Christian today.

The Latin text used as the source of this translation is the second edition of the Vitae Patrum, published in 1628, in which the Vita Antonii appears. The Vitae Patrum is a collection of various ancient patristic documents about the lives of the fathers and mothers of the desert, edited and annotated by Herbert Rosweyde, SJ. The text also appears in the Patrologia Latina of J P Migne (1800–1875).
Athanasius' Life of Antony is not a biography in the modern sense of the word. It is more in the nature of a hagiography, a 'writing of holiness', in accordance with the conventions of the time. Athanasius was bishop of Alexandria from 328–373 and was well acquainted with this extraordinary person called Antony who from the age of about twenty went off by himself to live in the Egyptian desert, which was considered to be the dwelling place of wild beasts and demons, and where a person could seek to serve God in the absence of all secular distractions. People followed him out to the desert to learn from him, and so began what Athanasius called the 'peopling of the desert'. Antony died in 356 at the age of 105, and Athanasius wrote this celebration of his life soon afterwards. It has had an enormous influence in the history of Christianity throughout the ages, so that Antony is often known as the 'Father of Monks'. But the word 'monk' comes from monos, 'alone'. Antony was never a monk as we understand the word today, but 'solitary' he certainly was. And there is much in his teaching which is still valid for the individual Christian today.

The Latin text used as the source of this translation is the second edition of the Vitae Patrum, published in 1628, in which the Vita Antonii appears. The Vitae Patrum is a collection of various ancient patristic documents about the lives of the fathers and mothers of the desert, edited and annotated by Herbert Rosweyde, SJ. The text also appears in the Patrologia Latina of J P Migne (1800–1875).

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Publish date: Aug 27, 2003
Added to Scribd: Aug 30, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9781475909524
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