Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
4Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Understanding the Nation-States: In Comparative Research Methods and Theories

Understanding the Nation-States: In Comparative Research Methods and Theories

Ratings: (0)|Views: 35 |Likes:
An essay for the 2012 Undergraduate Awards Competition by Teju Adisa-Farrar. Originally submitted for Arts at None, with lecturer Henrike Rau in the category of Social Studies
An essay for the 2012 Undergraduate Awards Competition by Teju Adisa-Farrar. Originally submitted for Arts at None, with lecturer Henrike Rau in the category of Social Studies

More info:

Published by: Undergraduate Awards on Aug 30, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
See more
See less

04/13/2014

 
Understanding the Nation-States: In Comparative Research Methods and TheoriesWith the increase of globalization, national barriers are continually and consistentlybeing broken down. In addition to the globalization and technology phenomena, sinceindustrialization and the development of modern global cities immigration has steadilyincreased. As a result, not only are there cultural and racial differences, there are alsoclass differences within nation-states that have developed over time. With theculmination of these differences of cultures, ethnicities, races, and social class it makes itdifficult to analyze a nation-state as a homogeneous entity. Regardless, there is still acommon notion upheld that nation-states have constructed a cohesive national identitythat is reflected in their official language, culture, and traditions. While it may seemeffective to compare nation-states as homogenous entities, it would be more effective toanalyze current societies using a different unit of analysis. This question of comparingnations as homogenous entities will be discussed using the Republic of Ireland and SouthAfrica as case studies.Key words: nation-state, comparative research, homogeneity, nationalism, developmentWord count: 3,083 (not including reference list)
 
Understanding the Nation-States: In Comparative Research Methods and TheoriesWith the increase of globalization, national barriers are continually andconsistently being broken down. Even in nations that would be considered “remote,” theInternet has allowed for the spread of ideas beyond national boundaries and anotherforum for cultural imperialism. Movement support spreads around the world in a matterof minutes and inspires other social movements. In addition to the globalization andtechnology phenomena, since industrialization and the development of modern globalcities immigration has steadily increased. As a result, not only are there cultural andracial differences, there are also class differences within nation-states that havedeveloped over time. With the culmination of these differences of cultures, ethnicities,races, and social class it makes it difficult to analyze a nation-state as a homogeneousentity. However, there is the assumption that each nation-state has an official nationalidentity that reflects the nation, usually made up of common language and culturalvalues. Furthermore, while it may be helpful to look at and compare the development of nation-states as homogenous entities, when doing comparative analysis of contemporarynation-states and social issues it will not be effective to use the nation-state as the unit of analysis.With increasing levels of immigration and ethnic differences, heterogeneity hasbecome characteristics of many modern democratic nation-states as a result of colonialand imperial legacies and connections. The Republic of Ireland will be used in theformation of the argument for the usage of the nation-state as a unit of analysis, whereasSouth Africa is a country that represents the difficulties in using nation-states as ahomogenous measure in comparative research and requires debunking general notions of nation-states as homogeneous entities. While it is possible to compare the overalldevelopment of countries (economically and politically) in-terms of the nation state, thisstill proves to be limited and does not take into account the differences regionally,
 
culturally, and socially within countries that are understood to be nation-states.Comparative Sociology as a method has used cross-national research as a way of formulating better policies within nations, studying educational structures cross-culturally, and has used theories to find similarities between nations on two differentsides of the globe. As empires collapsed and were partitioned “nation-states developed,so too did the opportunities for cross-national research” (May, 180). Often nation-statesdeveloped from the fight for independence from an empire or colonial power. Thisusually comes out of nationalist ideologies initiated by a group, a nation or ethnic group,demanding a nation-state that represents their identity and allows them to govern anddetermine their own economic, political, and social affairs. These tend to be countrieswith ethnic groups that were ruled under an oppressive regime or empire and had theircultural values suppressed or attempted to be eliminated. Nationalism is a struggle forterritory to be under the jurisdiction of and controlled by a specific nation or ethnicgroup. In this sense, studying the development post-independence of certain countries canbe done on a nation-state basis.The assumption is that a nation-state has a set of common characteristics that arereflected and agreed upon in the symbols, culture, and people representing that nation.Usually a nation-state has an official language, which is the language spoken by themajority and all official documents and discourse are spoken in this language. Forexample, the official language of Spain is Spanish and the official language of NorthAmerica is English. There is a unifying culture expressed through cultural values such asmusic (a national anthem), food (the national dish), and the religion that is most practicedby the majority. Even in countries where church and state are separated there is a covertunderstanding of what the religious background of the country. The United States hasnever had a president that is admittedly non-Christian. There is one type of currency usedin the whole country and is only accepted as legitimate currency. These are all factors

Activity (4)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->