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Table Of Contents

Range ofdecision making processes
What is a decision support system (DSS)
Birth and evolution ofdecision support systems
Application ofdecision support systems
Analytical versus operational systems
Decision support systems do not require a data warehouse
Benefits ofdecision support systems
Whom does it benefit
Consequences ofmultiple applications and platforms
Limitations oftransaction processing systems
Birth ofthe data warehousing concept
Types ofdata warehouses
Enterprise data warehouse
Data mart
Operational data store
Differences in operational and data warehouse data
Competitive environment
Globalization
Economic factors
Key business drivers
Rapidly declining hardware prices
Proliferation ofdata
More desktop power
Technology developments:software and hardware
Growth in Internet and Intranets
Shift in focus from data to information
Availability ofapplication software
End-users are more technology savvy
Beneficiaries
Data Warehouse Characteristics and Design
BASIC CHARACTERISTICS
Integrated
Subject-oriented
Integrated
Time variant
Non-volatile
Database design technique:Star schema
Database partitioning
Aggregation
Levels ofdata
Current detailed data
Lightly summarized data
Highly summarized data
Data archiving
Granularity
Logical data model
Physical data model
Importance ofbuilding a data model
PROCESS Data warehouse process components
Acquisition component
Storage component
Target database
Source database
Target database
Access component
Physical architecture and infrastructure
Application and deployment architecture
Defining the architecture
NEED FOR DATA MIGRATION
Data quality requirements
Problems with source data
Data cleansing
Acquisition
Loading
Data preparation
Automating data migration
Selecting the tools
Data warehouse engine
Engine requirements
Type ofdatabase to use
ETL tasks
ETL tools
Requirements
Data access tools
Features
Categories
Data mining
Choice ofvendors
What is a data mart
Data mart characteristics
Infrastructure:platforms and vendors
Benefits ofdata marts
Problems with data marts
Which approach to use
Extraction and loading
Demand for multi-dimensional views and analysis
Limitations oftraditional databases
Characteristics offact and dimension tables
Multi-dimensional analysis
Multi-dimensional database
Snowflake schema
OLAP database server
Desired OLAP features
OLAP versus OLTP
MOLAP versus ROLAP
Hybrid OLAP (HOLAP)
Selecting a vendor
Justification
Project prerequisites
Evaluate potential impact
Obtain sponsorship
Evaluate readiness for implementation
Consider using a data mart approach
IDENTIFYING BARRIERS,CHALLENGES,AND RISKS
Barriers
Complexity
Integration
Financial risk
Resource and schedule constraints
Politics
Design differences
Complexity and size ofdata warehouses
Difficulty in managing projects
Business and technical skill requirements
Decision making capabilities
Perform skills assessment
Select implementation partner
Select project leader
Determine project team requirements and roles
Select project team members
PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION
Planning
Analysis
Design
Implementation
DEPLOYMENT AND OPERATION Deployment
Operating the data warehouse
Inadequate components
Not differentiating between a database and a data warehouse
Consensus regarding data definitions is lacking
Inadequate or too much data
External data is ignored
Wrong tools are selected
Inadequate project plan and inaccurate estimates
Scope creep
Inadequate testing and validation
Lack ofadequate attention to deployment
Operation issues are not addressed adequately
Shortage ofskilled data warehouse resources
Not realizing that data warehouse projects rarely end
REPORTING Users cannot perform ad hoc reporting
Decision support gets inadequate attention
Inappropriate data access tools
Obtain management commitment
Evaluate development approach and methodology
Do not prematurely narrow down the solutions
Realize that business rules can be conflicting
Plan a solid architecture
Make business requirements the architecture’s foundation
Design a scalable architecture
Do not underestimate migration difficulties
Do not underestimate ETL effort
Do not ignore historical data
Favor best practices
Start with a pilot
Implement using a project plan
Specify responsibilities and deliverables
Select a motivated project team
Choose an experienced leader for the project
Control the scope
Manage rollout
Integration ofdatabases with analytical tools
Integration with transaction systems
Integration across tools and platforms
Integration with ERP and CRM systems
Scalability
Web-enabled access
Improved query and analysis tools
Unstructured data
Merge capabilities
Agent technology
Visualization
List ofData Warehousing Vendors
Index
P. 1
Data Warehousing 101

Data Warehousing 101

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1,485|Likes:
Published by iUniverseBooks
Data Warehousing 101: Concepts and Implementation will appeal to those planning data warehouse projects, senior executives, project managers, and project implementation team members. It will also be useful to functional managers, business analysts, developers, power users, and end-users. Data Warehousing 101: Concepts and Implementation, which can be used as a textbook in an introductory data warehouse course, can also be used as a supplemental text in IT courses that cover the subject of data warehousing.

Data Warehousing 101: Concepts and Implementation reviews the evolution of data warehousing and its growth drivers, process and architecture, data warehouse characteristics and design, data marts, multi-dimensionality, and OLAP. It also shows how to plan a data warehouse project as well as build and operate data warehouses. Data Warehousing 101: Concepts and Implementation also covers, in depth, common failure causes and mistakes and provides useful guidelines and tips for avoiding common mistakes.
Data Warehousing 101: Concepts and Implementation will appeal to those planning data warehouse projects, senior executives, project managers, and project implementation team members. It will also be useful to functional managers, business analysts, developers, power users, and end-users. Data Warehousing 101: Concepts and Implementation, which can be used as a textbook in an introductory data warehouse course, can also be used as a supplemental text in IT courses that cover the subject of data warehousing.

Data Warehousing 101: Concepts and Implementation reviews the evolution of data warehousing and its growth drivers, process and architecture, data warehouse characteristics and design, data marts, multi-dimensionality, and OLAP. It also shows how to plan a data warehouse project as well as build and operate data warehouses. Data Warehousing 101: Concepts and Implementation also covers, in depth, common failure causes and mistakes and provides useful guidelines and tips for avoiding common mistakes.

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Publish date: Aug 21, 2003
Added to Scribd: Aug 30, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9781469719245
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