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Lase and Place

Lase and Place

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The Naval Research Laboratory has developed a laser-based device-transfer process for placing/embedding on any surface millimeter- to micrometer-size structures, such as semiconductor bare die, surface-mount and optoelectronic devices, sensors, actuators, and microelectro-mechanical systems (MEMS). The NRL Lase and PlaceTM process begins by mounting the components to be transferred on a laser-transparent support using an intermediate sacrificial polymer layer. Upon exposure to pulsed laser light, the sacrificial layer is ablated, and the generated vapor releases a single component and propels it from the support to the desired surface location. The technique is less likely to cause damage to fragile components compared to the mechanical “pick and place” process and has been demonstrated capable of transferring 10-µm thick bare die, which is impossible to achieve with the current mechanical process. Laser direct-write processes can also be used to create a depression, or pocket, in which the component is embedded and to print electrical interconnects to the part after it is in place, thereby combining the work of several tools into one.

NRL Technology Transfer Office
http://www.nrl.navy.mil/techtransfer/fs.php?fs_id=MAT24

Naval Research Laboratory website
http://www.nrl.navy.mil
The Naval Research Laboratory has developed a laser-based device-transfer process for placing/embedding on any surface millimeter- to micrometer-size structures, such as semiconductor bare die, surface-mount and optoelectronic devices, sensors, actuators, and microelectro-mechanical systems (MEMS). The NRL Lase and PlaceTM process begins by mounting the components to be transferred on a laser-transparent support using an intermediate sacrificial polymer layer. Upon exposure to pulsed laser light, the sacrificial layer is ablated, and the generated vapor releases a single component and propels it from the support to the desired surface location. The technique is less likely to cause damage to fragile components compared to the mechanical “pick and place” process and has been demonstrated capable of transferring 10-µm thick bare die, which is impossible to achieve with the current mechanical process. Laser direct-write processes can also be used to create a depression, or pocket, in which the component is embedded and to print electrical interconnects to the part after it is in place, thereby combining the work of several tools into one.

NRL Technology Transfer Office
http://www.nrl.navy.mil/techtransfer/fs.php?fs_id=MAT24

Naval Research Laboratory website
http://www.nrl.navy.mil

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Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: U.S. Naval Research Laboratory on Aug 30, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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09/17/2013

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