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Sydney Observatory Teachers Notes 2012

Sydney Observatory Teachers Notes 2012

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Published by Powerhouse Museum
Sydney Observatory Teachers Notes 2012
Sydney Observatory Teachers Notes 2012

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Published by: Powerhouse Museum on Aug 31, 2012
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 WHAT WE OFFER FOR YOUR CLASS
Sydney Observatory oers educational toursboth day and night. Daytime tours can be bookedMonday to Friday during school terms or up to80 students starting at 10.00 am or 12.00 noon. Weekend tours can be arranged or countryschools. Night tour session times vary throughoutthe year depending on daylight saving and start at6.15 pm or 8.15 pm (except December and January which start at 8.30 pm).Each 90-minute day tour can be tailored to your students needs and is guided by an astronomyeducator.
See page 17 for booking details.
PROGRAM OVERVIEW 
 Astronomy tour
(see page 7 for details)
•Touroftheastronomyinstrumentsondisplay
in the Observatory
•3-DSpaceTheatre•Planetarium•Telescopeviewing
 Weather tour
(see page 9 for details)
•Visitthe
Observing the weather 
interactive andhistoric exhibition at the Observatory
•DatacollectionusingObservatoryequipment•3-DSpaceTheatre•VisittonearbyBureauofMeteorology
instrument lawn
 AlsoavailablearejointvisitswiththePowerhouse
Museum, IMAX, Sydney Learning Adventures, Australian National Maritime Museum
(see page 5for details).
3-D Space Theatre
(see page 11 for details)
Providinganamazing3-Dspaceexperience,the
3-D theatre technology was developed in Australia by the Centre or Astrophysics andSupercomputing at the Swinburne Institute o 
TechnologyinMelbourneandshowsshortlms
on the solar system, space exploration andcosmology.
Planetarium
Thisisanastronomerledexperienceinacosyplanetarium.Thestareldcylinderusedincludes
an extraordinarily precise depiction o the Milky Way based on the beautiul all-sky panoramascreated by astrophotographer Dr Axel Mellinger.
Telescopes
(see page 13 for details)
TheObservatoryhastwofunctioningtelescopedomes.Theoldersouthdomenowhousesthe
oldest working telescope in Australia, a 290 mm or 
11.5inchrefractingtelescope.Thenorthdome
houses a 400 mm computer controlled SchmidtCassegrain refecting telescope and a CoronadoSolar telescope or sae viewing o the Sun duringthe day.
IN THESE NOTES YOU WILL FIND
•Curriculumlinks—page2•Jointdiscountvisits—page5•Observatoryoorplans—page6•Astronomytours–page7•Weathertours—page9•3-DSpaceTheatre—page11•Backgroundinformation—page13•Astronomyresources—page15
School visits
TEACHERS NOTES
SolarSystemMontage.PhotocourtesyGetty.
 
SYDNEYOBSERVATORYTEACHERSNOTES
2
Theastronomyandmeteorologyexhibitionscan
be easily integrated into content strands, units o  work or areas o teaching and learning in theollowing syllabus areas:
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (YEARS K–6)
Built environments (Stage 2 and 3)
•buildingsandthespaceswithinandsurrounding
these buildings, eg homes, schools, communityacilities and actories, parks and gardens.
•naturalenvironmentsthathavebeenmodied
to suit particular needs, eg land cleared or arming and altered waterways
•servicesprovidedtocommunities,egelectricity,
 water, etc
Inormation and communications (Stage 2 and 3)
•thenatureofcommunications•methodsofcommunicatingbetweenindividuals,
groups and communities, eg personalconversation, telephones, satellite link-ups
•changestoinformationandcommunication
technology over time.
Physical phenomena (Stage 2 and 3)
•relationshipsbetweentime,spaceand
movement
•sourcesofenergy•lightandsomeofitscharacteristics•heatandsomeofitscharacteristics
Earth and its surroundings (Stage 1, 2 and 3)
•thesolarsystem,planets,Earth,Moonandstars•aspectsofthephysicalenvironment,egthe
Earth’s crust, its oceans and atmosphere
•naturalchangesthatoccur,suchassoilerosion,
volcanic eruption, climatic changes andmovement o water 
•thepassingoftimeandthenaturaleventsthat
make people aware o this passing, eg dailycycles, lunar cycles and seasons
•thevarietyandcharacteristicsofnaturally
occurring materials
•themethodspeopleusetoobtainandprocess
materials
•themethodspeopleusetomanagenatural
resources
•limitationstoresourcesavailableonEarth•renewableresources.
Suggested units o work:
•Stage1HotorCold,APlaceinTime•Stage2KeepinTouch,CyclesinourWorld•Stage3OutinSpace,What’stheWeather 
HUMAN SOCIETY AND ITSENVIRONMENT HSIE (K–6)
Stage 2
Change and Continuity, Signifcant Events andPeople
•CCS2.1DescribeseventsandactionsrelatedtotheBritishcolonisationofAustraliaandassesseschangesandconsequences.
Change and Continuity Time and Change
•CCS2.2Explainschangesinthecommunityand
amily lie and evaluates the eects o these ondierent individuals, groups andenvironments.
Environments, Patterns o Place and Location
•ENS2.5Describesplacesinthelocalareaand
other parts o Australia and explains their 
signicance.
Stage 3
Change and Continuity Cultures SignifcantEvents and People.
•CCS3.1Explainsthesignicanceofparticular
people, groups, places, actions and events inthe past in developing Australian identitiesand heritage.
Change and Continuity Cultures CulturalDiversity.
•CUS3.4Examineshowcultureschangethrough
interactions with other cultures and theenvironment.
MATHEMATICS (K–0)
Early Stage 1 Measurement: Time
•Describethedurationofeventsusingeveryday
language
•Sequenceeventsintime•Namedaysoftheweekandseasons
CURRICULUM LINKS
 
SYDNEYOBSERVATORYTEACHERSNOTES
3
Stage 1 Measurement: Time
•Useinformalunitstomeasureandcompare
the duration o events
•Nameandorderthemonthsandseasonsof
the year 
•Identifythedayanddateonacalendar 
Stage 2 Measurement: Time
•Recognisethecoordinatedmovementsofthe
hands on a clock 
•Readandrecordtimeusingdigitalandanalog
notation
•Convertbetweenunitsoftime•Readandinterpretsimpletimetables,
timelines and calendars
Stage 3 Measurement: Time
•Convertbetweenam/pmnotationand24-hour
time
•ComparevarioustimezonesinAustralia,
including during daylight saving
•Drawandinterpretatimelineusingascale•Usetimetablesinvolving24-hourtime
Stage 4 Measurement: Time
•Performoperationsinvolvingtimeunits•Useinternationaltimezonestocomparetimes•Interpretavarietyoftablesandchartsrelated
to time
Stage 4 Data: Data
•Draw,readandinterpretgraphs(line,sector,
travel, step, conversion, divided bar, dot plotsand stem-and-lea plots), tables and charts
•Distinguishbetweentypesofvariablesusedin
graphs
•Identifymisrepresentationofdataingraphs
Stage 2 Space and Geometry: Positions
•DeterminethedirectionsN,S,EandW;NE,
NW, SE and SW, given one o the directions
•Describethelocationofanobjectonasimple
map using coordinates or directions
SCIENCE (7–10)
•Outcome4.1—Identieshistoricalexamplesofhowscienticknowledgehaschanged
people’s understanding o the world
•Outcome5.1—Explainshowsocialfactors
infuence the development and acceptance o 
scienticideas•Outcome4.2—Usesexamplestoillustrate
how models, theories and laws contribute to anunderstanding o phenomena
•Outcome5.2—Describestheprocessesthat
are applied to test and validate models,theories and laws
•Outcome4.4—Identieschoicesmadebypeoplewithregardtoscienticdevelopments•Outcome5.4—Discussesscienticevidence
supporting dierent viewpoints
•Outcome4.6—Identiesanddescribes
energy changes and the action o orces incommon situations
•Outcome5.6—Appliesmodels,theoriesand
laws to situations involving energy, orce andmotion
•Outcome4.9—Describesthedynamic
structure o Earth and its relationship to other parts o our solar system and the universe
•Outcome5.9—Relatesthedevelopmentof
the universe and the dynamic structure o Earth to models, theories and laws and theinfuence o time
•Outcome4.12—Identies,usingexamples,
common simple devices and explains why theyare used
•Outcome5.12—Relatestheinteractions
involved in using some common technologies
totheirunderlyingscienticprinciples•Outcome4.13—Clariesthepurposeofan
investigation and, with guidance, produces aplan to investigate a problem
•Outcome5.13—Identiesaproblemand
independently produces an appropriateinvestigation plan
•Outcome4.15—Usesgivencriteriatogatherrst-handdata•Outcome5.15—Gathersrst-handdata
accurately
•Outcome4.16—Accessesinformationfromidentiedsecondarysources•Outcome5.16—Accessesinformationfroma
 wide variety o secondary sources
•Outcome4.22—Undertakesavarietyof
individual and team tasks with guidance
•Outcome5.22—Plans,implementsand
evaluates the eectiveness o a variety o tasksindependently and as a team member 

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