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Human Vampires (1912)

Human Vampires (1912)

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Published by draculavanhelsing
West Gippsland Gazette 1912 (March 26)
West Gippsland Gazette 1912 (March 26)

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Published by: draculavanhelsing on Aug 31, 2012
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09/01/2013

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West Gippsland Gazette (Warragul, Vic. : 1898 - 1930) , Tuesday 26 March 1912, page 4National Library of Australiahttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article68657761
THE
VAMPIRE.
EX'fitAORDINARY
$TORY,
You
will
probably
think
I
AMpullingyour
legs,
but
I
amasking
y'L
In
all
seriousnessto
letme
knowFYhether
you
havehad
eny
experienceofanifl
pires,Personally,
I
believe
they
do
exist.
I
met
two
'
once
at
MoulteCarlo,
and
was
couvnctlthat
they
were
vampires.
Iremembered
havrinbreaftoldIn
1the
Balkans,
where
ererybody
believesinvampires,thatgarlic
it-
a
very
potent
amlidoe,
SirIprocureda
cloveof
garlic
fromthe
waiter
atthe
.Sportnabe
C;,db,
andlthe
fwovampires
bothered
m
no
more.Buitone
day
asIwasplaytlhrsvlette
I
sat
onthe
garlicand
natle'
myself
very
unpopular.
Here
isa
story
about
a
vam'ptre
W
IhaveJust
read
in
r
ri'denHpaper.Iwelltell
Itas
t
it'
l
happened
tomyself,forthat
iU:lsaenv
time.
1.says
thewriter,knew
a
vampit@'a~
Isliilgonbetweenthe
years
100'?
and'
1905.She
was
married
and
had
fbtt"
chilldion:
She
was
fantasticallybeall:
tiful.
Byvthat
Imean
thatthere
wS:S
something
extraordinary,
almostsupert
natural:
about
hrer
beauty.To
begli'
with,
lier
face
wasaswhiteas
thfs?sheet
of
paper
before
I
beganto
write
on
it,
so
whiteas
tobe
almost
terri
fying.
A
yetsItewasnot
intheleastterrifying
whenyoucame
to
know
her:Onthe
contrary,
she
wasfaseinatin-n.
aspeople
sayinEngland.Her
eyes.lier
hair,her
mouthre
deemed
the-excessive
pallorof
her
skin.I
do
not
know
whichwas
the
most
tempting-tle'burning
bush
which
illuminatedlier'
skull;
the
Imge
pathetic
devouring
eyes,
or
her
srmset-red
lips.
Five
years
previously
she
suddenlydied.Do
notstartoutofyourskins.
Shereally
dill'
dii:
Twodoctors
certi
fiedher
di'ath.
Threedayslaterher
body
began
to
decompose.
On
thefourth
day
EI'elyr
(TrovwIdale
rose
fromthedead.
Sllhe
simuply
rose
front
herdeathbed
and'puton
her
clothes
and
wentaboutasusual:
Not
quiteas
usual,forhermemory
was
in
agreatstateof
disorder.Shetalked
incoherently
and
had
lost
all..affection-for
her
relhtlons.
She
seemed
tohave
a
dual
personality.
In
respect
ofeventssubsequent
toherdeath,
she
-spoke
in
the
fli'stperson;previous
events.
however,
were
attributed
to
a
vague
and
utterlydifferent
personality.
After
a
time
sheseemed
to
acquireaf
fectionforher
relations,
butthe
affec
tion
was
almostunaunny.
tion
was
almostunaunny.
It
had
a
very
remarkableeffect
uponthliem.
Herfather
wasaffected
least
of"all.
ITer
mother
and'
lher
eldersister
HItrrietbecame
languid.Her
youngersister
Juliet
seemed
tohave
gone
Into
a
decline,
while
her
little
brotherJack
becameincapable
ofcontinuing
hisles
sonsat
school;
lieslept
at
least
nine
teenhours
outof
the
twenty-four.
The
family
dbotor
expressed'
surprise,
but
c
suggest
no-
remedy.
In
tilespring
they
wererather
better,
and
their
improvement
coinlided
with
the-appearance
of
a
young
mannamed
James
Bliuewinkle;
who
hadfallenInlove
with
Evelyn.
She
married
himInthe
summer,and
the
family
recovered
its
normal'healthvery
soonafter
herdeparture.But
.TamesBluewihkle-
(thisis
my
Frenchmau'sIdea
ofan
Englishname)
became
pale
andsickly,
thoughhe
had
previouslyhad'the
appearance
ofa
Sandow.The
doctor
packed
him
off
todo
arestcure
in
a
nursing
home,
and
Evelyn
went
tostay
with
herfamily.
They
all
fell
ill'
agait,
while-
Bluewinkle
regained
all
his
oldstrength
and
energd.Whenhe
cameout,
and
was
rejoined
by
hiswife,the
family
re
coveredagainand
he
grewpale
and
sickly.This
aroused
his
suspicions,and
hebeganto
watch
his
wife.
One
night
he
pretendedto
go
to
sleet
but
really
remainedon
tlhe
alert.
At
aboutone
inthemorning
shewoke
up
and'
bent
over
hint
He
felt
herfixing
herwarm-
lipsupon
his
neck.Itwasastrangesensation,
vollptuousand
dis
quieting.
Herlipsbreathedin
some
thing
with
infinite
gentleness,
and
he
felt
his
strength
departing
fromhim.Sohepulled'himselftogether,
leaped
outof
bed
and
exclauimed,"Wretched
woman!"
Theonly
answerwasa
sob,
andwhen
heturnedoo
the
lightshe
saw
Evelyn
hiding
her
face
in
thepillowand
trembling
ineverylimb.
She
answered
dreamily,
"I
can't
help
it.
I
should
die."
Thensuddenly
an
inspiration
en
lilghtenedBluewinkle.
IHe
knew
asan
absolute
factthatEvelyn
was
avampire.
At
first
he
wasfilled
with
fear
aundl
horror.
Thenhe
was
touched
by
her
tears,
blinded
by
the
beauty
of
herblazing
hair.
After
all,
she
was
very
differentfromthe
vampiresof
tradi
tion,
forherheart
andcharacter
were
the
kindest
andpurestin
the
world.
Hetriedtocross-question
her
aboutthe
eventsof
her
apparent
deathfive
yearsago.
Buther
recollectionswere
very
vague.
"I
found
memnories
InEvelyn's
body,"she
said,
"but
allI
know
is
thattheydo
not
belong
to
me.
I
haveother
old

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