Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Inclusive Museum: Ways of Learning through Sensory Exploration

The Inclusive Museum: Ways of Learning through Sensory Exploration

Ratings: (0)|Views: 46 |Likes:
An essay for the 2012 Undergraduate Awards (International Programme) Competition by Ada Luisa Sinacore. Originally submitted for Museum Internship at McGill University, with lecturer Cecily J. Hilsdale in the category of Modern Cultural Studies
An essay for the 2012 Undergraduate Awards (International Programme) Competition by Ada Luisa Sinacore. Originally submitted for Museum Internship at McGill University, with lecturer Cecily J. Hilsdale in the category of Modern Cultural Studies

More info:

Categories:Types, School Work
Published by: Undergraduate Awards on Aug 31, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
See more
See less

10/27/2013

 
 The Inclusive Museum:Ways of Learning through Sensory Exploration
 
 AbstractDue to the “ocularcentric” nature of art museums, blind people are continuously beingexcluded from participating in museum life. As a result of the 2004 Disabilities DiscriminationAct (DDA) increasing legal pressure has been placed on museums to develop inclusiveprogramming for the blind and visually impaired. Yet, much of the “inclusive” programming isineffectual and rudimentary. Blind and visually impaired scholars and intellectuals are frustratedwith the lack of rigorous educational opportunities available to them at art institutions. Othersargued that the visitors’ (both sighted and visually impaired alike) inability to employ otherforms of sensory perception at museums inhibits their understanding and ability to appreciate,enjoy and learn about art. In the following paper, I discuss the need to improve museumeducation programming in order to guarantee that the blind and the visually impaired have thesame opportunities to access museum collections as seeing persons. Further, I argue that inprivileging the sense of sight over other senses (e.g. touch) museums are preventing all people(sighted and blind alike) from having embodied learning experiences, and in so doing, arecreating a hierarchy of the senses (thereby favoring sighted people over visually impairedindividuals).
 
 The underlying goal of art museums is as follows: (a) to provide public access to their artcollections, (b) to assure the preservation of artifacts for future generations, and (c) to promoteart education and learning.
1
However, due to the “ocularcentric” nature of art museums, blindand visually impaired people are continuously being excluded from participating in museumlife.
2
As a result of the 2004 Disabilities Discrimination Act (DDA) increasing legal pressurehas been placed on museums to develop inclusive programming for the blind and visuallyimpaired.
3
Yet, much of the “inclusive” programming is ineffectual and rudimentary. Blind andvisually impaired scholars and intellectuals are frustrated with the lack of rigorous educationalopportunities available to them at art institutions. As one blind woman explained, “[theprograms] tend to be very, I know it is a horrible term but, dullened out, when you go out tothings that are organized [for blind people] … where it is almost the lowest commondenominator.”
4
Others argued that the visitors’ inability to employ other forms of sensoryperception at museums inhibits their understanding and ability to appreciate, enjoy and learnabout art. A blind woman affirmed that she never fully understands what a person is describinguntil she can touch the actual object being discussed.
5
Words and descriptions are not asmeaningful as personal sensory experiences. Therefore, in the following essay, I will discuss theneed to improve museum education programming in order to guarantee that the blind and thevisually impaired have the same opportunities to access museum collections as seeing persons.Further, I will argue that in privileging the sense of sight over other senses (e.g. touch) museumsare preventing all people (sighted and blind alike) from having embodied learning experiences,
1
Valorie Beer. “The Problem and Promise of Museum Goals.” In
Curator: The Museum Journal
2
Fiona Candlin. “Blindness, Art and Exclusion in Museums and Galleries.” In
The International Journal of Art & Design Education
22, no. 1 (2003): 101.
3
Ibid.
4
Ibid., 102.
5
Ibid., 104.

Activity (3)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 hundred reads

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->