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Dress Design, By Talbot Hughes

Dress Design, By Talbot Hughes

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The Project Gutenberg eBook, Dress design,by Talbot Hughes
Title: Dress designAn Account of Costume for Artists & DressmakersAuthor: Talbot HughesRelease Date: January 10, 2011 [eBook #34903]Language: EnglishCharacter set encoding: ISO-8859-1***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK DRESS DESIGN***
E-text prepared by Constanze Hofmann, Suzanne Shell,and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team(http://www.pgdp.net)
Transcriber's Note:
 A number of typographical errors have been corrected. They are shown in the text withmouse-hover popups. Hover the cursor over the marked text and the nature of the correction will appear.All greyscale images have been provided as thumbnails. A larger version of those images isavailable by clicking on the link below the image.The numerous full page images have been moved to the nearest paragraph break, the pagenumbers for these pages have been omitted. Where the index links to such a page, the link goesdirectly to the image in question.
 
 THE ARTISTIC CRAFTS SERIESOF TECHNICAL HANDBOOKSEDITED BY W. R. LETHABYDRESS DESIGNlarger image A Long-trained Muslin Dress. About 1800.
DRESS DESIGN
AN ACCOUNT OF COSTUME FOR ARTISTS & DRESSMAKERS BY TALBOT HUGHES ·ILLUSTRATED BY THE AUTHOR FROM OLD EXAMPLES · TOGETHER WITH 35PAGES OF HALF-TONE ILLUSTRATIONS
 
LONDONSIR ISAAC PITMAN & SONS, LTD.Bath, Melbourne, Toronto, and New York Reprinted 1920
GENERAL PREFACE TO THE SERIES[xi]
In issuing this volume of a series of Handbooks on the Artistic Crafts, it will be well to statewhat are our general aims.In the first place, we wish to provide trustworthy text-books of workshop practice, from thepoints of view of experts who have critically examined the methods current in the shops, andputting aside vain survivals, are prepared to say what is good workmanship, and to set up astandard of quality in the crafts which are more especially associated with design. Secondly, indoing this, we hope to treat design itself as an essential part of good workmanship. During thelast century most of the arts, save painting[xii] and sculpture of an academic kind, were littleconsidered, and there was a tendency to look on "design" as a mere matter of 
appearance
. Such"ornamentation" as there was was usually obtained by following in a mechanical way a drawingprovided by an artist who often knew little of the technical processes involved in production.With the critical attention given to the crafts by Ruskin and Morris, it came to be seen that it wasimpossible to detach design from craft in this way, and that, in the widest sense, true design is aninseparable element of good quality, involving as it does the selection of good and suitablematerial, contrivance for special purpose, expert workmanship, proper finish and so on, far morethan mere ornament, and indeed, that ornamentation itself was rather an exuberance of fineworkmanship than a matter of merely abstract lines. Workmanship when separated by too wide agulf from fresh thought
 — 
that is, from design
 — 
inevitably decays, and, on the other hand,[xiii]ornamentation, divorced from workmanship, is necessarily unreal, and quickly falls intoaffectation. Proper ornamentation may be defined as a language addressed to the eye; it ispleasant thought expressed in the speech of the tool.In the third place, we would have this series put artistic craftsmanship before people asfurnishing reasonable occupations for those who would gain a livelihood. Although within thebounds of academic art, the competition, of its kind, is so acute that only a very few per cent. canfairly hope to succeed as painters and sculptors; yet, as artistic craftsmen, there is everyprobability that nearly every one who would pass through a sufficient period of apprenticeship toworkmanship and design would reach a measure of success.In the blending of handwork and thought in such arts as we propose to deal with, happy careersmay be found as far removed from the dreary routine of hack labour, as from the terribleuncertainty[xiv] of academic art. It is desirable in every way that men of good education shouldbe brought back into the productive crafts: there are more than enough of us "in the city," and itis probable that more consideration will be given in this century than in the last to Design andWorkmanship.

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