Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Why did Scotland become part of the union of the kings of great Britain in 1707 and Ireland remain an independent Kingdom.

Why did Scotland become part of the union of the kings of great Britain in 1707 and Ireland remain an independent Kingdom.

Ratings: (0)|Views: 10|Likes:
This essay will examine the trajectry of Ireland and Scotland during the 16th century to determine why Scotland became inextricably linked with Britain, while Irelands relationship with the crown gradually fragmented. The crowns approach to both enitys will also be explored and how it had a cultural binding effect in scotland while having a diametrically opposite one in Ireland.
This essay will examine the trajectry of Ireland and Scotland during the 16th century to determine why Scotland became inextricably linked with Britain, while Irelands relationship with the crown gradually fragmented. The crowns approach to both enitys will also be explored and how it had a cultural binding effect in scotland while having a diametrically opposite one in Ireland.

More info:

Published by: Undergraduate Awards on Sep 01, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
See more
See less

01/09/2014

 
Why did Scotland become part of the union of the Kings of Great Britain in 1707,and Ireland remain an independent kingdom.
The 1707 Act of Union would see the amalgamation of Scotland and England, whileIreland would remain an independent kingdom. This essay will begin by suggesting thatScotland was more likely to be subsumed in to a joint British kingdom, due to ahereditary royalist culture and the absence of any credible separatist tradition. The effectsof the enlightenment in the seventeenth and eighteenth century will be examined, arguingthat an evolving of intellectual thought lay the groundwork for the Act of Union inScotland. In contrast, in Ireland the huge injustices perpetrated against the catholicmajority were anything but enlightened, a mutual coming together of Ireland and Englandwas further inhibited by a protestant ascendancy which were more complex than thesubservient protestant Scots. Finally and probably most significantly, economics will belooked at. The Act of Union would also be an index for the beginning of the BritishEmpire. Like all imperialist empires, capitalism dictates. This essay will conclude thatScotland’s integration was more useful to a British economic project in 1707, whileIrelands was not.The union of the Kings in 1603 is significant in understanding why Scotland would besubsumed in to Great Britain and why the kingdom of Ireland would survive. It could beargued King Jame’s accession to the throne was physiologically significant in cultivatinga loyal Scottish mentality, and created an inalienable identity with the British monarchy.Some historians have suggested that the seventeenth century was a period when Scottish1
 
identity was gradually diluted, which in turn was conducive in uniting England andScotland in 1707.
1
While Scotland was divided among presbyterians, jacobites andanglicans it did produce a king in James the I and VI and viewed the national interest beyond its border with England. This thinking can be traced back to James the I and VI,who articulated this emerging ideology when he stated ‘away taking of that partition wallwhich already by gods province is rent asunder’.
2
By 1707 most Scots would have had a preposition towards the idea of a British monarchy in contrast to Ireland. While themajority of Scots would have rejected Kings such as Charles the I and James the II,Scotland did view its place with in a royal frame work more so than the Irish. KeithBrown suggests that the fighting during the English civil war warranted a ‘Britishsolution to a British problem’; he also adds that these situations created opportunities for Scottish leaders to make new contacts with the British aristocracy.
3
The xenophobiclexicon used by Whig politicians such as ‘Scotch vermin and Irish frogs” was matchedwith a cultivating of aristocratic relations between the English and the Scottish.
4
Thiscoupled with increasing cross border marriages, was slowly knitting together theideological integration of England and Scotland.
5
Unlike Scotland, Ireland did not have the same shared hereditary connections with thecrown. Indeed since the kingdom of Ireland was established in 1541, Ireland’s evolutionwas punctuated with rebellion. Rebellions as far back as the Kildare or Desmonds in the
1
Keith Brown, ‘The origins of a British Aristocracy’, Steven Ellis, Sarah Parker ,
Conquest and Union, Fashioning a British State, 1485-1725
, (London 1995), p222.
2
Frank Welsh,
The Four Nations
, (London 2002),p149.
3
Keith Brown, ‘The origins of a British Aristocracy’, Steven Ellis and Sarah Parker 
Conquest and Union, Fashioning a British State, 1485-1725,
(London 1995),p224.
4
Icid,p226.
5
Keith Brown, ‘Scottish Identity’, Brendan Bradshaw and Peter Roberts,
 British Consciousness and  Identity,
(Cambridge 2000),p222.
2
 
sixteenth century, illuminate an ambiguity about loyalty to the crown that would continuethrough out the next century. Eighty per cent of Ireland which was catholic certainly didnot share the same devotion to the idea of monarchy as the Scottish population.
6
Whilemany catholic Irish fought against Cromwell and for James the II, this was probably moreout off a tactical and political necessity, rather than devotion to the monarch. Indeed thewater that separated both countries geographically was also matched with a psychological barrier that limited a British consciousness developing, in contrast to Scotland. JimSmyth suggests that the Scots seen themselves as north Britons, where as the Irish protestants with the expectation of the Ulster presbyterians seen them self’s as English.
7
.Smith states that the kingdom of Ireland was ‘annex’d’ to the king of England and saysthat the Irish protestant community was tied to England by the imperatives of securityand statue.
8
The cultural and political shifts which took place during the seventeenth century is oftenreferred to as the ‘Augustan age’.
9
 This era is also associated with not only a revolutionof literature and art, but also an awaking of emerging political thought. A more rationalapproach to religious views was beginning to percolate sections of society. John Lockes
The Reasonableness of Christianity
reflects a stratum of society that began to challengethe dogmatism of religious and political beliefs.
This new intellectual thinking which began to permeate Europe, was also developing in Britain. Changing political andeconomic circumstances demanded a more rational approach to the national interest. In
6
David Smith,
 A History of the Modern British isles, 1603-1707 
, (Oxford 1998), p334.
7
Jim Smith, ‘Anglo Irish Unionism before 1707’ Brendan Bradshaw and Peter Roberts,
 BritishConsciousness and Identity,
(Cambridge 2000),p307.
8
Icid,p307.
9
David Smith,
A History of the Modern British isles, 1603-1707 
, (Oxford 1998),p323.
10
Icid,p322.
3

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->