Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more ➡
Buy Now $3.99
Standard view
Full view
of .
Add note
Save to My Library
Sync to mobile
Look up keyword or section
Like this
3Activity
×

Table Of Contents

Pre-Victorian cultural influences
Downside of early UK national culture: an emerging ‘coolie’ class
establishment opposition to Victorian manufacturing
Malign influence of certain cultural factors
Contrasting cultures of merchants and manufacturers
An industry-hostile elite and a disenchanted workforce
Industry suffering from a deeply flawed educational culture
the public school exception that proved the rule
Industry disapproval by the literati
Advancing towards the ‘new Industries’
Pre-World-War I UK motor industry pioneers
A national culture unsympathetic to manufacturing
Motor industry culture hung on the choice of production model
Drawbacks of the fordist production model
UK ‘craft-mass’ production model once preferred over Fordism
shortage of investment capital
Fears of globalisation and FDI
near revolution in the labour market and growth of financial sector
Decline of the industrial middle classes hampered management
Adverse effects of industrial protectionism
historic absence of appropriate education for manufacturing staff
Post World-War-II motor industry recovery: fast and then slow
Clouds gather over the nascent British Motor Corporation
Misguided actions of BMC directors
Growing competition from the transplants
A recent assessment of BMC’s comparative market ‘failure’
Performance of BMC relative to transplant manufacturers
Growth in globalisation a further threat for UK’s ability to innovate
should trade-unions be blamed for the BLMC collapse?
Post World War 2 economic realities
Cultural effects on decline of the indigenous UK motor industry
An economic culture damaging to industrial reorganisation
national culture had affected the industrial culture
Changing cultures of the middle and working classes
educational constraints on industrial progress
successive governments’ failure to sustain industry
onward march of globilsation
A malign cultural inheritance
effective directorship squandered by government’s aid withdrawal
BLMC/BL production increased while UK market share dropped
Different forms of individual ‘production-models’
Rover Group privatisation soon led to the BMW takeover
Intensification of the British mercantile and deferential cultures
the wrong focus on manufacturing within education and training
small ‘c’ conservatism and the two cultures in British education
Class-divides and looking backwards hurt industrial performance
Change in political culture led to a painful economic legacy
shorter- and longer-term, economic consequences
Downsides of globalisation, FDI and choice of production model
Distrust and individualism: malign effects of the liberal economy
the final decline of MG-Rover also reveals malign cultural effects
the UK industrial culture inheritance
Questioning the certainties of UK industrial culture
A slimmer monarchy to diffuse ‘establishment’ power
tackling the sacred cow of land ownership
Reforming government policies and institutions
Reforming industrial democracy
A seminal plea from the workshop
Reform of the British education system
school-level educational reforms need priority
University level reforms focus on technology
Requirements for the knowledge economy
Reform of the financial sector
need for UK to change from being a Liberal Market economy
near-future opportunities for eVs, from press reports
Developments for farther future eV operation, from press reports
APPenDIX B
APPenDIX C
Graphs figured in main text
ReFeRenCes
P. 1
New Ways for Indigenous Manufacturing

New Ways for Indigenous Manufacturing

Ratings: (0)|Views: 679|Likes:
Published by AuthorHouseBooks
Many people in the UK, and in other mature economies, are bewildered by the erosion of indigenous manufacturing that has taken place since the 1980s, and before. While a number of economic historians have examined this decline, to reveal the economic causes, little has been made of the underlying national and corporate cultures affecting a single corporation, in this case one comprising all of UK indigenous volume motor manufacturing.

John Fenton studied the writings of researchers who have observed manufacturing decline since the Industrial Revolution, to make a case for the redirection of the culture (ways-of-life) of national and industrial leaders in order to help bring about industrial revival.

New Ways for Indigenous Manufacturing recognizes the very positive contribution to the UK economy of foreign direct investment (FDI) transplants, but past applications of FDI have also yielded negative effects on native industry. The book reminds politicians of some of these dangers, and hopefully restores public confidence in them, with a promise that some patented technologies could be held by start-up companies, for national rather than overseas exploitation.
Many people in the UK, and in other mature economies, are bewildered by the erosion of indigenous manufacturing that has taken place since the 1980s, and before. While a number of economic historians have examined this decline, to reveal the economic causes, little has been made of the underlying national and corporate cultures affecting a single corporation, in this case one comprising all of UK indigenous volume motor manufacturing.

John Fenton studied the writings of researchers who have observed manufacturing decline since the Industrial Revolution, to make a case for the redirection of the culture (ways-of-life) of national and industrial leaders in order to help bring about industrial revival.

New Ways for Indigenous Manufacturing recognizes the very positive contribution to the UK economy of foreign direct investment (FDI) transplants, but past applications of FDI have also yielded negative effects on native industry. The book reminds politicians of some of these dangers, and hopefully restores public confidence in them, with a promise that some patented technologies could be held by start-up companies, for national rather than overseas exploitation.

More info:

Publish date: Aug 29, 2012
Added to Scribd: Sep 03, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9781477223215
List Price: $3.99 Buy Now

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
See More
See less

12/15/2012

231

9781477223215

$3.99

USD

pdf

You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 10 to 96 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 106 to 157 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 167 to 185 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 195 to 210 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 220 to 231 are not shown in this preview.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->