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Chinese Ghosts (1931)

Chinese Ghosts (1931)

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Published by draculavanhelsing
Cairns Post 1931 (Aug 10)
Cairns Post 1931 (Aug 10)

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Published by: draculavanhelsing on Sep 04, 2012
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02/05/2014

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Cairns Post (Qld. : 1909 - 1954), Monday 10 August 1931, page 2National Library of Australiahttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article48718439
CHINESE.
GHOSTS.
!
SOME
WEIRDSTORIES.
[
Although
China
has
long-teen,
re-;
!
cognifcd
as
cite
ofthe
citadels
oLandehtj
superstition,
trustworthy
accounts
of
its'
ccccltbeliefs
are
comparatively
rare,
and
.¿cernto
havebeencompiled*chiefly
by
¡.eopíc
whoscarcely
regardedthem,
as
:
worth
chronicling.Butthosewho-have
j
thctimeand
taste
forresearch
of
this
\
kind
will
findthemselves
amply
repaid
;
by
exploration,
into
Chinese.
beliefs
i
regarding
thc
unseen
worldand,thespeer
»re.»
anddemonswhopeople
it
(writes
I
Levis
Spence
in
the
"Weekly
Scots
iman").
\
.
I
Although
theChinecc
are
by
nomeanstl«;
mest
innatelysuperstitious
among
j
¡the
nations
and
profess
to
laugh
at!
i
supernormal
occurrences
just
as
many
!
Europeans
do.they
are
still
extremely
prone
to
ideas
so
bizarreand
even
grue
?one
that
itislittle
wonder
that
even
j
thesebest
acquainted
withthembelieve
I
them
to
bethe
most
demon-haunted^
among
thepeoplesoftheEast.Thecatalogueof
Chinese
demonsand
spirits,
good
andbad
is
an
almostend-
lessone,
bnt
inthisarticle
1
shall
deal
more
specifically
withthe
Chinese
ideaofthe
ghost
proper,
the
haunting
spec-
tre,
a
phase
of
Celestial
superstitionwhich
lias
been
unaccountably
neglected
by
Western
writers.
'
GHOSTOF
A
«-STOVE."
Likemanypeoples
in
a
muchlower
state
of
civilisation,
theChineseregard
I
theOtherworld
as
a
shadowy
replica
ofthe
earth-life,
and
even
go
as
far
as
to
attribute
an
afterexistence
to
inani-
mate
objects.
We
must
not
be
surprised,
therefore,
if
we
hearofthe"ghosts"ofchairsand
tables,
ofthespooksof
mats
andcarpets-particularlynastyspooks,
too,
which
are
liableto
leap
cn*one
fromtheshadowsof
a
deserted
staircase
and
I
make
matters
unpleasantforhim.
I
These,
indeed,
are
usuallybf
a
most
malevolent
disposition.
Astory
is
told
of
two
students
who
begged
to
beal-
lowed
to
put
upin
an
unoccupied
house
near
Pekinwhile
sitting
for
their
exam-
inations
in
the
capital.
Thehouse
was
believed
to
bchaunted.Buttheyscoffed
at
the
rumor.
Onenighttheyheardthesoundoffootsteps
as
if
someone
were
mounting
the
stairs.
Taking
a
lightedcandle,theymade
a
search,andin
dismay
beheld
on
the
steps"
a
beingattired
inblack,
about
twofeet-
high,andwithout
eyes,nose,
or
mouth.-
Its
long
hairstood
on
endand
it
whistled
in
a
terrifyingfashion.
It
approached
in
a
terrifyingfashion.
It
approached
them,
throwing
out
extraordinary
rays
ofheat
asit
came,andthehaplessyouths,rooted
to
the
spot,
couldonlyshriekforhelp.Just
as
it
reachedthem¡bewatch,
hearing
theircries,
brokethedoor
down,
andentered,andthe
appar-ition
vanished.
It
was
believed
to
have
beenthe
"ghost"
of
a
large
stove
which
was
afterwardsfound
in
the
garden
be-hindthehouse;andwhen
this
was
broken
up
themanifestationsabruptlyceased.
PHANTOMBARRELANDCANDLESTICK.
i
A
patrolman
intheHo
Tung
district
I
was
going
hisrounds
one
brilliantmoon-light
night
when,
passing
a
monastery,
;
he
sawa
huddled
figure,
squatting
on
I
the
ground.
It
was
black
all
over,
and
1
strangely
stilL
Out
ofcuriosity
be
touched
it
wihhis
staff,
when
it
dis
¡
closed
a
long
leanfacewith
anex-
pression
so
ghastlythathe
immediately
collapsedwithfright.
The
creature
rose,
I
and,after
hovering
over
him,disap-
peared
;
laterwhen
thcmonastery
re-
quired
a
new
gate,
there
was
dug
up
from
the
ground,
at
thc
siteselected,
a
varnished
barrel,
covered
on
thetopwith
white
clay.It
was
the
"ghost''
of
this
seeminglyharmless
object
which
the
patrolman
had
seen.
Amilitary
officer,
one
Shih
TsungWu,
had
a
largefamily,
all
of
whom
i
sufferedfrom
a
peculiarlypainfuland
malignant
disease.
Eachnightthefigureof
a
man,fromwhose
body
sparksof
firewere
emitted,enteredthe
houseand
passed
through
theprincipalapartments.As
it
did
so
thepatients
felt
theirsuf-ferings
increase.
Tsung
tookhisbowandarrows,and
laidin
waitforthe
spectre.
When
it
appearedhe
loosed
his
shaftandthe
arrow
went
home,
knock-
ing
a
showerofsparksfromtheincan-descentimage.Callingfor
lights,
hefoundthathehad
hit
a
very
oldandcuriouscandlestickmadeof
cámphorwood,
whichhadbeen
in
thcfamily
foi
generations.Theobject
wasat'once
broken
up
and
burnt
andtheashefthrownintothe
river,
so
thatthemale-volent
spirit
which
had
dweltwithin
il
might
be
"laid."
After
this
thefamilj
were
curedof
their
malady,
andth<
hauntings
ceased.
But
tlie
ghosts
of
people
are
believec
\y
tlie
Chínese
torevisit
thcearth,
pre-cisely
as
elsewhere,
and
attempts
t(
communicate
withthem
are
quite
acommonas
in.this
country.
TheChin
ese
have
a
special,
kindofplanchettimade
like
a
large
V-shapedwooden,
forkresembling
inits
outlinesthe"wishbone"of
a
fowl,
with
a
pencilattachée
 
bone"of
a
fowl,
with
a
pencilattachéeto
tlie
apex.Thepointofthepencil
i:
placed
overa
boxofsand,each
arni
o:
the
instrumentbcing,held
by
oneor
tw«
operators.Charactersintheclums;
Chinese
script
are
written
on
thesandand
are
transcribed
by
a
third
persoiuntil
themessage
is
complete.
I
THE"UNDEAD."
Mediumsandthe
entire¿apparatus
o
^piritnaliím
are
as
commonly
encount
ered
in
China
as
amongourselves,
am
thclaying
or
exorcisingofghosts
i
accomplishedby
following
specificdi
rcctions
given
in
theConfucian
classic:Particular!;.-eerie
are
thoseChinese
tale
ut
the"undead,"
or
vampires,huma:beingswhorefuse
torestintheirgrave;
and
who
desire
to
wreckvengeance
o:
tile
living.
Such
ghostsusuallyhav
fjiaringeyes,
long
sharpclaws,
ani
arc
covered
withwhite
or
greenish-whit
hair,
and
will
pursueformilesthoswho
are
unluckyenough
to
cross
theipaths.
.V
dreadful
tale
is
toldof
a
travelle
who
was
accommodated
by
an
innkeepe
in
a
room
wheretheuncofñned
body
o
i
dead
man
laybehind
a
curtain.
Jus
as
he
was
failing
asleepheheard
;
rustlingbehindthe
screen,
and,th
corpse
emerged.
It
crossedthe
root
to
v:herc
he
lay,
breathedupon
him
aw
rctrrncd
to
the
conch
on
which
it
halbi-en
hid
out.
Eachtimehe
movo
abo
stirred.
At
last,
nerving
himselherushed
from
thehouse,followed
b;
ibe
vengeful
dead.Indesperationhconcealedhimself
behind
a
tree,'
01
whichthe
r:sir~e
rushedwithsuchfur
*
-
".firmly-inthetrunk
%'.?
*;\:itwas
foundthat
its
fin
.
h::;i
boredintothe
tree'so
deep!
-.utto
remove
it
theyhad
to
be
cut
ofi
CORPSETHATYAWNED.
Therelived
at
Hang
G101Î
a
giftei
^uistnamedLiuIHsien.
Hard
b;
welt
a
fatherandhis
son,
and
cn
th
-kath-of
theformerthe
son
askedLiu
t<
rax.t
a
memorial
portraitofhimwhi!:hefuneralr.rrangemcuts
were
bein
made.Tlie
artist
arrived
at.
the
hous
'n
theson'sabsence,and.
went
upstair
;n
searchofthebody,whichhefounjstretched
out
ona
couch'.
Arranging
hi
drawing
materialshe
setto
workcopy
'"n£tlie
palelineaments,
when
sudden!the
rorree
sat
up,
yawned,
andstretche
its
limbs.Horrified,Liu
at
cnce
concluded
that
itwasa
v.
yampire,and
knowing
wei
that
the
"undead''invariably~attack
one'if
he.
atteUtptstoescapetheir
presence,
if
he.
atteUtptstoescapetheir
presence,
he
quietlycontinued
with
his
drawing;the
corpse
imitatinghis
.
every
move-
ment
inthe
ittóst
unnerving
manner.
-,
The
so.it"at-last
returned,andwhen
i
he
saw
the.body,
of
hisfathersittingup
cn
the.
bed;fainted
in
sheer
terror.
Liupluckilycontinuedwith
hisportrait.
At
last
heheard,
thé'
undertaker's-mencarryingthe
coffin,
andcalledto
tficnito
bring
some
brooms.
Grasping.what
was
.wrong,theyseized
a
couple^of
,
broomsandwithrépeatedblowsbeatthe
vam-
pireback
upon
thc
bed,.andthen
bat-
tened
it
downsecurely
in
the
coffin.
ATTACKED
BYA
"VAMPIRE."
?
?
*
A
stillmore
terrifyingstoryof
a
vampire
comes
from
Canton.Two
citi-zens
of
Nanking,
Chankand
Li,
went
to
Canton
on
business.
Li
prolonged
hisviritto
that
city,
giving
Chang
a
lettertohjs
family,which
was
dulydelivered.But
as
he
was
executing
.this
friendlyerrand
Chang
was
toldthat
Li's
fatherhaddied
on
theprevious
day
andthatthe
body
was
lyingin
state
inthcprin-
cipa!
apartment
ofthehouse.
After
thepious
custom
qf
the'
Chinese
hemadethe"usual
ritual
offerings,and
as
he
was
invited
to
stayovernightoccupied
a
chamber
on
thcother
side
ot
the
court-
yard
to
that-in
whichthedead
man
lay.
Late
at
night
he
was
awakened
by
a
slight
rustling
noise,
and
peering
through,
a
crack
in
tlie
paper
window
hebeheld
a
strange
right;:
The
widow
ofchedeceased^
was
praying
besidethe
body
bfherhusband,
a
lightedincense
stickin
herhand.
Then,approachingChang's
room,sheslipped
off
hergirdleand
tied
thehandlesof
tlie
foldingdoors
tightly
together,.af
ter
which
Chang,
in-
spired
by
a
sense
of
coming
evil,con-
tinued
to
sit
up,
watchingthrough
thecrack
in
thewindow.He
saw
thecof-
fin
openandthedead
manrise.
His
face
xis
black
as
a
demon's,
hiseyes
glaredincandescently
inhis
head,and
his
wholeexpression
was
fierce
and
terrible.
The
awfulthing
leapt
from
its
coffin;
and
with-whistlingbreath
came
straightfor
Chang's
door.
It
snapped
thegirdlewhichheldthedoors
likestraw
andboundedintothe
room.
Chang,
horri-
fied,
hadonlytime
to
push
a
largeward-robe
upon
the
vampire
whenhe
col-
lapsedandfainted.
Thewidow,hearing
the
noise,
andaccompanied
by
herservants,
rushed
to
Chang's
assistance.
When
shehad
re-
vivedhimwith
a
cordialsheexplainedthat
her
husbandhad'led
a
mostevil
life
andsince
his
death
hadappeared
to
herandtoldherthat
Chang
would
visit
Thehouse."Hewill-have
a
large
sum
of

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