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The Stag - Issue 44

The Stag - Issue 44

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Published by: The Stag on Sep 09, 2012
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Newspaper of the students of the University of SurreyIssue 44 Tuesday 20
th
March 2012
Union elections
Contenders release their manifestos for the 2012 Elections.See them all here in
The Stag
, starting on page 17.
UNION vs UNIVERSITYSHOWDOWN OVER PAY
L
ast Week the National Unionof Students and UNISON cametogether to launch a new campaign– to ‘name and shame’ universitiesthat fail to award all staff the LivingWage.The union duo said that all staff employed by universities or byprivate sub-contractors on campusesshould be paid at least the nationalLiving Wage of £7.20 an hour or £8.30in London.The NUS and UNISON said thatthey will aim to identify thoseuniversities which fail to award theLiving Wage to the lowest paid staff.This is proposed to take the formof a league table whereby universitieswill be ranked according to pay ratefor those employed by universitiesand sub contractors on campus.This table will also show the gapbetween the lowest and highest paidstaff employed at universities.NUS VP for Society & Citizenship,Dannie Grufferty said: “There isclearly an inherent injustice in theaverage vice-chancellor getting paid
By John Kavanagh. News Team
Continued on page 3...
OPINION & ANALYSISWho should be stopped:
Kony or Russell?
Page 8...FEATURESSee the highlights of IFestival,
including thewonderful Ifashion showon
page 11...FILMReviews of the latest
lms,
including SafeHouse and Detatchmenton
page 39…SCIENCE AND TECHDo woodpeckers getheadaches?
Find outon
Page 14...MUSICRubix vs The LivingRoom –
Shervin Hejazicontemplates Surrey’smusic scene
. Page 33...SPORTGU2 Radio
challenges theSyrians at Ifestival
.Page 48...LITERATUREInternational Women’sDay
2012 and the under-representation of womenin literature.
Page 42...NEWS
More on DGL Securityfeatured in Issues 42 and43.
Page 2...
• National Union of Students joins with UNISON trade union to battle unfair wages.• Surrey Vice-Chancellor Sir Christopher Snowden earns £313,000pa plus £43,000pa pension.
(L) Dannie Grufferty, NUS VP Society & Citizenship has launched a campaign for the Living Wage. (R) Surrey Vice-Chancellor Sir Christopher Snowden earns £356,000 a year, but has yet to sign up to pay all University workers a minimum of just £14,000 a year.
Vote!
26/3till30/3
 
NEWS2The Stag | 20
th
March 2012news@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Editor |
 Jack Whiteeditor@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Editor-in-Chief |
Bakita Kasadhaussu.communications@ussu.co.uk
Deputy Editor (Design) |
Hollie Rowe-Robertsdesign@thestagsurrey.co.ukDesign Team | Ellie Brodie, Paul A Richmond, Hannah Roberts-Owen,Christina Morman, Louisa White and Alexandra Wilks
Deputy Editor (Marketing) |
Tom Gouldingmarketing@thestagsurrey.co.ukMarketing Team | Shervin Hejazi, Imogen Jones, Eleanor Pearson andGenevieve Webb
NewsNews Editor |
Jyoti Rambhainews@thestagsurrey.co.ukNews Team | Kathryn Braid, Sophie Howard, John Kavanagh, JyotiRambhai, Melissa Raske and David Williams
FeaturesFeatures Editor |
Nicole Vassellfeatures@thestagsurrey.co.ukFeatures Team | Peter Bailey, Ellie Brodie, Chris Thomas, Hannah Wann,Becky Powell, Stephen Cartwright, Louisa White, Ellis Taylorand Sophie Vickery
Science and TechnologyScience and Technology Editor |
Nathanael Roomesciencetech@thestagsurrey.co.ukScience and Technology Team | Lawrence Finn, Dave Holcombe,Shourya Khanna, Kate McAtamney, Melissa Raske, Alex Smith andRuth Smithers.
SocietiesSocieties Editor |
Chris Dightonsocieties@thestagsurrey.co.uk
ArtsDance and Theatre Editor |
Hannah Jellimandancetheatre@thestagsurrey.co.ukDance and Theatre Team | Emily Bourne, Sarah McDowell,Beth Hedges, Lucy Jarvis, Tiffany Stoneman and Lexi Sutton
Film Editor |
Tiffany Tucker
lm@thestagsurre.co.uk
Film Team | Laura Howard, Caroline James, Kristie Marchant, ChristinaMaria Webb and Louisa White
Music Editor |
Sophia Fieldmusic@thestagsurrey.co.ukMusic Team | James Campbell, Liam Conroy, Dan Davidson,Amy McGivern, Tanya Noronha and Elliot Tyres
Literature Editor |
Alexandra Wilksliterature@thestagsurrey.co.ukLiterature Team | Rachel Burgess, Stephanie Davies, Tessa Heenan,Candice Ritchie, Emily Smart, Emma Thomas, Sophie Vickery andRebecca Worley
SportSport Editor |
Jordan Vinesport@thestagsurrey.co.ukSport Team | Douglas Elder, Arabella Gilby, George Gigneyand Sam Limbert
Copy Editors |
Megan Barnacle, Michaela Fulton, Emma Giles,Candice Ritchie and Louisa Whitecopyteam@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Webmaster |
Andrew Smithwebmaster@thestagsurrey.co.uk
Photo Editor |
Tessa Morganphotos@thestagsurrey.co.uk
The Stag
is a newspaper editorially dependent on and published bythe University of Surrey Students’ Union.The views expressed in the paper are those of the individualauthors and do not necessarily represent the views of the educationalteam, the whole Students’ Union or the University of Surrey.Trinity Mirror (South)8 Tessa Road, ReadingRG1 8NS
The Stag
reserves the right to edit all submissions and the right todecide which articles are published.
The
Grapevine
Nothing but the finest Surrey opinion,rumour and conjecture
I
n the print version of this edition of 
The Stag
we reportedthe existence of a rumour circulating the Universityrelating to a senior member of the University staff. Weaccept this should not have been published and would liketo apologise for publishing the rumour which we acceptto be untrue. On a personal level, I apologise to both theindividual concerned and the University for any distressand inconvenience caused. Jack WhiteEditor
O
nce again, several student societieshave had their budgets frozen afterfailing to attend Societies Standing:
•Accounting&
Finance Soc
•MathsSoc•SociologSoc•OrthodoSoc•ARCS•ChessSoc•Entrepreneurs•InvestSoc•AsianSoc•CpriotSoc•HellenicSoc•PolishSoc•RussianSpeakers•TamilSoc•ConservativeSoc
R
ecently the DGL SecurityServices at the University of Surrey has been criticised aboutthe way they have handled certainsituations. ‘The Stag’ even had anarticle about allegations made bySocieties at events in the livingroom.DGL usually offer a continuedprofessional development trainingon a voluntary basis, once everythree months. However, due tothe number of complaints receivedrecently, a Refresher Training a theStudents’ Union was held on March9 and 16.The DGL staffs are there to keepstudents, staff and members of thepublic safe.It is known that alcohol canmake people not care about theconsequences, therefore, it is theDGL staffs job to guide those whohave consumed a bit too much tosafety and remind them of theconsequences of their actions.This can often mean escortingdrunken people off the premises.When escorting people out,it can take up four DGLs: two toguide the individual out, and twoto ensure they have a way outthrough the crowds and to preventany unnecessary situations. Itis mostly for the safety of theindividual involved and others.All members of DGL are trainedto recognise the warning anddanger signs of given situations.They call this ‘The Ladder of Violence’ and will react inaccordingly in an aid to preventthese events turn into aggressiveor violent outbursts.One of the complaints DGLreceived was in regards to bagsearches. DGL door supervisor hasthe right to make a citizen searchif they have asked permission fromthe person whom they want tosearch.The individual does have theright to refuse, and if they arestill searched, then it becomes acommitted offence.These same laws apply to anycitizen of the UK. The same appliesfor arrest, DGL are allowed to makea citizen’s arrest only.Violence or any force againstsomeone is only to be used byDGL in self-defence; if there ispotential harm to themselves orothers around them. However, thisshould be proportionate and onlyused if necessary.The DGL are an importantservice at the University of Surreythat helps keeps students safe.General Manager of DGLServices, Gio, stated: “DGL Servicesrecognises that in today’s businessenvironment quality, consistencyand professionalism are veryimportant to our customers.“We are committed todelivering an excellent service thatexceeds the industry standard,so apart from the more practicaland serious side to security; weadd style, a smile and good publicrelations skills to complement ourservice.”DGL Services can be contactedeither on 01428608818 or by emailon info@dglservices.com.
What does a DGLSecurity job entail?
By Jyoti Rambhai, News Editor
T
he 2012 Labour Students NationalConference, commenced inManchester last week on the 25
th
 February. It was a creative affair,with elections, delegates, candidates,motions on everything from ‘oneperson, one vote’ to ‘whether or not tosupport 6K student tuition fees’.The event started on Saturdaymorning, and began with a talk fromthen Chair Olivia Bailey, swiftly movinginto a series of elections for various fulland part time positions on the council,to motions and caucuses on the fourliberations – LGBT, BAME, Women, andDisabled.One person who stood out wasPhil Pocknee, a candidate from HullUniversity, who gallantly stood downdue to the requirement of at least onefemale needing to be elected into aVice-Chair position. He stood down, toallow for the swift passing of Bex Baileyas Vice-Chair, Communications &Policy. It was a show of understanding,and respect for the process and eachindividual candidate – an event I washappy to be representing the Universityof Surrey at.Pocknee’s actions led to questionsbeing raised over the fairness of this,questions of legalised discriminationsagainst men, in favour of women.Which led to the most importantquestions of all: “Why aren’t morewomen more interested in high powerpositions?” Shouldn’t we be addressingthis issue, instead of changing the lawto accommodate for the few womenwho do want high powered jobs, thusalienating men? This is a discussionthat has been prevalent in the newsthis week, as the EU plans a new quota,to push through more women in theworkroom into high powered positions.There were plenty of interestingquestions raised, and interestingdiscussions at the conference, some of the more notable speakers were EstelleHart, and Danielle Grufferty, bothexceptional young women, who madethe conference very enjoyable.
Question of quotas for women’s engagementdominates 2012 Labour Students conference
By Leia Achampong, Contributor
Do>More and the Students’Union bring you the AnnualCelebration of Volunteering
H
ave you been part of a club or society,been a Freshers’ Angel, worked in StageCrew, fundraised for RAG or volunteeredwith Do>More, been a part of Societies Execor Sports Exec or even Part-Time Union Execor taken part in Sport Relief 2012? If so, comealong to the Celebration of Volunteering torecognise all the good work done this yearby Surrey students. Join us from 6pm inRubix for food, drink, photos with Steve theStag and much more.
By the Union
 
NEWS3The Stag | 20
th
March 2012News Editor: Jyoti Rambhai | Copy Editor: Emma Giles
Showdown with unions overpay for low paid employees
M
onday 12
th
March marked thestart of a week of rallying bystudents across the country in aneffort to get universities and thegovernment to ‘Come Clean’ about
theirnancialplansforhigher
education.Prior to the 2010 elections52,000 students marched togetherin protest to the planned increaseof tuition fees.
Sincethentheghthas
continued, with a number of protests taking place includingthousands of students marchingthrough London last November.Last week it continued, withcampuses all around the countryholding different events includingprotests, rallies, teach-ins anddiscussions.University of Warwick studentspresented receipts stating theamount spent on hidden coursecosts along with pictures of students ‘caged by costs’ to theirVice-Chancellor.Kings College studentsorganised a ‘big day out’ in whichthey hosted teach-ins, other stunts
andattachedpricetagslledout
by students to a giant pound sign.More than 30 universities,colleges and organisations hadtheir own events.The main event was a nationalwalk out held on Wednesday 14March.The aim of the protests wasto allow students to demonstratetheir feelings about the increasedmarketisation of higher educationas well as encouraging universitiesto give fee waivers rather thanbursaries to vulnerable students.It also focused on the shortfallin funding compared to the costsof being at university which areestimated to be more than £8000outside London, for the academic year 2011 to 2012.
Thisgureisbasedonan
average cost of £16,279 for coursecosts including fees, travel costsand books as well as the costof living which includes rent,food, insurance, travel and otherexpenditures.From this number an income(excluding part time job income) of £8,242, estimated by the NationalUnion of Students, is subtracted togive the shortfall.
Thenalaimoftheweekwasto
protest the hidden costs includingthe cost of books, trips and essentialequipment like lab coats.NUS president Liam Burnsspoke about the week stating: “Weneed a national debate on changesto higher education and this weekwe will remind ministers that weare watching what they’re doing.”“…Students, parents, lecturersand anyone with a stake ineducation wants to know what thegovernment and our institutionshave in store for higher educationand demand that they come clean.”
Students take action in‘Come Clean’ campaign
By Melissa Raske, News Team
more than 17 times more than aminimum wage employee on theircampus.“Colleges and universitiesare a community and everyonewithin that community needs tobe treated with dignity and thatmeans paying them a wage theycan live on for their work.“The difference betweenminimum wage and a living wageis the difference between constantmoney worries and being able tomake ends meet. It also makessense for employers who’ll see arise in productivity and greaterretention of staff.“Employers at colleges anduniversities have six months toget their house in order beforewe name and shame those thatallow such shocking disparities tocontinue.”The NUS and UNISON areset to launch the ‘Living WageCampaign’ this month which willbe supporting students and studentunions with developing their ownlocal level campaigns to achieveliving wage status for the low paidemployees of universities.Recently Manchester University
becametherstinstitutionto
achieve success from the campaign,winning the living wage for all fulltime staff on campus.
Tondoutmorevisitwww.
alivingwage.co.uk where resourcesare available to help with acampaign for the living wage atuniversity.
...Continued from front page
“The difference betweenminimum wage and a livingwage is the differencebetween constant moneyworries and being able tomake ends meet.”
The campaign urges the government and univerisities to ‘come clean’ about higher education funding
University helping victimsof prostate cancer to cope
A
new video has been launchedby the University of Surrey tohelp men suffering from prostatecancer.
Thelm,titledGetting
Down to Coping’, is intended toaccompany a self managementprogram for cancer sufferers.The video was made availablevia the University of SurreyWebsite and Youtube on March 1at the request of its participants.The video contains personalstories from fellow sufferers of the disease who speak frankly
onthedifcultiesfacedb
themselves and their families inovercoming prostate cancer.University of Surrey ResearchFellow Jane Cockle-Hearne saidshe hoped “showing how othermen have coped with their liveswill motivate men in the self management program to have
selfbeliefandcondence”.
Prostate cancer is the mostcommon form of cancer in menwith an estimated 250,000 peopleliving with the disease in the UK.A diagnosis of prostate canceralong with the side effects of treatment can have intensepsychological effects on mensuffering from the illness.The new program from theUniversity’s Faculty of Healthand Social Care hopes that havingprevious sufferers talk informallybut directly on the implicationsof treatment will help removethe feeling of isolation anduncertainty that comes with anymajor illness diagnosis.The self managementprogram, spearheaded byProfessor Sarah Faithful, works toteach men practical, physical andcognitive techniques to overcomethe side effects of radiotherapy.While trials are still underway an informal appraisal hasalready been given by mencurrently suffering from thedisease.1 in 9 men will be diagnosedwith prostate cancer in theirlifetime, mostly effecting theover 50’s, and it is estimated thatone man dies of prostate cancerevery hour.A new video has beenlaunched by the University of Surrey to help men sufferingfrom prostate cancer.
Thelm,titledGetting
Down to Coping’, is intended toaccompany a self managementprogram for cancer sufferers.The video was made availablevia the University of SurreyWebsite and Youtube on March 1at the request of its participants.The video contains personalstories from fellow sufferers of the disease who speak frankly
onthedifcultiesfacedb
themselves and their families inovercoming prostate cancer.University of Surrey ResearchFellow Jane Cockle-Hearne saidshe hoped “showing how othermen have coped with their liveswill motivate men in the self management program to have
selfbeliefandcondence”.
Prostate cancer is the mostcommon form of cancer in menwith an estimated 250,000 peopleliving with the disease in the UK.A diagnosis of prostate canceralong with the side effects of treatment can have intensepsychological effects on mensuffering from the illness.The new program from theUniversity’s Faculty of Healthand Social Care hopes that havingprevious sufferers talk informallybut directly on the implicationsof treatment will help removethe feeling of isolation anduncertainty that comes with anymajor illness diagnosis.The self managementprogram, spearheaded byProfessor Sarah Faithful, works toteach men practical, physical andcognitive techniques to overcomethe side effects of radiotherapy.While trials are still underway, an informal appraisal hasalready been given by currentsufferers of the disease.One in nine men will bediagnosed with prostate cancerin their lifetime, mostly effectingthe over-50’s, and it is estimatedthat one man dies of prostatecancer every hour.
By David Williams, News Team
To find out more go to:
 
www.
prostate-cancer.org.uk

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