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Published by Simanta Bordoloi
Artificial intelligence
Artificial intelligence

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Published by: Simanta Bordoloi on Sep 10, 2012
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1
Artificial Intelligence
Lecture – 11
Shyamanta M HazarikaComputer Sc & EngineeringTezpur University
Example
Consider the problem of representingthe following information:
Every person is mortal.
Confucius is a person.
Confucius is mortal.
How can these sentences berepresented so that we can infer thethird sentence from the first two?
 
2
Example
In PL we have to create propositional symbols to standfor all or part of each sentence. For example, we mighthave:
P = “person”; Q = “mortal”; R = “Confucius” 
The above 3 sentences are represented as:
P
Q; R
P; R
Q
we needed an explicit symbol, R, to represent an individual,Confucius, who is a member of the classes “person” and “mortal” 
To represent other individuals we must introduce separatesymbols for each one, with some way to represent the factthat all individuals who are “people” are also “mortal” 
PL is a weak language
Hard to identify “individuals” 
(e.g., Mary, 3) ;
Can’t directly talk about properties of individuals or relations betweenindividuals
(e.g., “Bill is tall”)
Generalizations, patterns, regularitiescan’t easily be represented
(e.g., “all triangles have 3 sides”)
 
3
PL is a weak language
First-Order Logic (abbreviated FOL or FOPC)is expressive enough to concisely representthis kind of information
FOL adds relations, variables, andquantifiers, e.g.,
“Every elephant is gray” 
x (elephant(x)
gray(x))
“There is a white alligator” 
x (alligator(X) ^ white(X))
First-order logic
First-order logic (FOL) models the world in terms of 
Objects,
which are things with individual identities
Properties
of objects that distinguish them fromother objects
Relations
that hold among sets of objects
Functions,
which are a subset of relations wherethere is only one “value” for any given “input” 
Examples:
Objects: Students, lectures, companies, cars ...
Relations: Brother-of, bigger-than, outside, part-of,has-color, occurs-after, owns, visits, precedes, ...
Properties: blue, oval, even, large, ...
Functions: father-of, best-friend, second-half, one-more-than ...

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