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Sense and Sensibility

Sense and Sensibility

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Published by: silvic on Jan 16, 2009
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10/24/2012

 
CHAPTER ICHAPTER IICHAPTER IIICHAPTER IVCHAPTER VCHAPTER VICHAPTER VIICHAPTER VIIICHAPTER IXCHAPTER XCHAPTER XICHAPTER XIICHAPTER XIIICHAPTER XIVCHAPTER XVCHAPTER XVICHAPTER XVIICHAPTER XVIIICHAPTER XIXCHAPTER XXCHAPTER XXICHAPTER XXIICHAPTER XXIIICHAPTER XXIVCHAPTER XXVCHAPTER XXVICHAPTER XXVIICHAPTER XXVIIICHAPTER XXIXCHAPTER XXX
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CHAPTER XXXICHAPTER XXXIICHAPTER XXXIIICHAPTER XXXIVCHAPTER XXXVCHAPTER XXXVICHAPTER XXXVIICHAPTER XXXVIIICHAPTER XXXIXCHAPTER XLCHAPTER XLICHAPTER XLIICHAPTER XLIIICHAPTER XLIVCHAPTER XLVCHAPTER XLVICHAPTER XLVIICHAPTER XLVIIICHAPTER XLIXCHAPTER L
Sense and Sensibility, by Jane Austen
The Project Gutenberg EBook of Sense and Sensibility, by Jane Austen This eBook is for the use of anyoneanywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use itunder the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.orgTitle: Sense and SensibilityAuthor: Jane AustenCommentator: Austin DobsonIllustrator: Hugh ThomsonRelease Date: June 15, 2007 [EBook #21839]Language: EnglishCharacter set encoding: ISO-8859-1*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK SENSE AND SENSIBILITY ***Produced by Fritz Ohrenschall and Sankar Viswanathan (This book was produced from scanned images of public domain material from the Google Print project.)Transcriber's Note:The Table of Contents is not part of the original book. The illustration on page 290 is missing from the book.The Introduction ends abruptly. Seems incomplete.
Sense and Sensibility, by Jane Austen2
 
[Illustration:
Mr. Dashwood introduced him.
--P. 219.]SENSE & SENSIBILITYBYJANE AUSTENWITH AN INTRODUCTIONBYAUSTIN DOBSONILLUSTRATEDBYHUGH THOMSONLONDON: MACMILLAN AND CO., LIMITEDNEW YORK: THE MACMILLAN COMPANY1902
First Edition with Hugh Thomson's Illustrations
1896* * * * *INTRODUCTIONWith the title of 
Sense and Sensibility
is connected one of those minor problems which delight thecummin-splitters of criticism. In the
Cecilia
of Madame D'Arblay--the forerunner, if not the model, of MissAusten--is a sentence which at first sight suggests some relationship to the name of the book which, in thepresent series, inaugurated Miss Austen's novels. 'The whole of this unfortunate business'--says a certaindidactic Dr. Lyster, talking in capitals, towards the end of volume three of 
Cecilia
--'has been the result of PRIDE and PREJUDICE,' and looking to the admitted familiarity of Miss Austen with Madame D'Arblay'swork, it has been concluded that Miss Austen borrowed from
Cecilia
, the title of her second novel. But herecomes in the little problem to which we have referred.
Pride and Prejudice
it is true, was written and finishedbefore
Sense and Sensibility
--its original title for several years being
First Impressions
. Then, in 1797, theauthor fell to work upon an older essay in letters
à la
Richardson, called
Elinor and Marianne
, which shere-christened
Sense and Sensibility.
This, as we know, was her first published book; and whatever may be theconnection between the title of 
Pride and Prejudice
and the passage in
Cecilia
, there is an obvious connectionbetween the title of 
Pride and Prejudice
and the
title of Sense and Sensibility
. If Miss Austen re-christened
 Elinor and Marianne
before she changed the title of 
First Impressions
, as she well may have, it is extremelyunlikely that the name of 
Pride and Prejudice
has anything to do with
Cecilia
(which, besides, had beenpublished at least twenty years before). Upon the whole, therefore, it is most likely that the passage inMadame D'Arblay is a mere coincidence; and that in
Sense and Sensibility
, as well as in the novel thatsucceeded it in publication, Miss Austen, after the fashion of the old morality plays, simply substituted theleading characteristics of her principal personages for their names. Indeed, in
Sense and Sensibility
the sense
Sense and Sensibility, by Jane Austen3

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