Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Christopher Pappas Distance Music Education

Christopher Pappas Distance Music Education

Ratings:

4.33

(1)
|Views: 301|Likes:
Published by Christopher Pappas
www.christopher-pappas.com

Review of the Literature

DISTANCE MUSIC EDUCATION

A. Overview
(Distance Music Education)
B. Historical Context
(Definition and Its Methods)
C. What it means in the world of education today
D. What is the role of the Music Teachers?
E. How effective is it for the students?
www.christopher-pappas.com

Review of the Literature

DISTANCE MUSIC EDUCATION

A. Overview
(Distance Music Education)
B. Historical Context
(Definition and Its Methods)
C. What it means in the world of education today
D. What is the role of the Music Teachers?
E. How effective is it for the students?

More info:

Published by: Christopher Pappas on Jan 16, 2009
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

11/26/2012

 
1Dr. Kathryn S. Hoff C&TE 679: Research in Career and Technology EducationOctober 10, 2007Christopher Pappas
Review of the LiteratureDISTANCE MUSIC EDUCATION
A.
 
Overview(Distance Music Education)B.
 
Historical Context(Definition and Its Methods)C.
 
What it means in the world of education todayD.
 
What is the role of the Music Teachers?E.
 
How effective is it for the students?
 
2Review of the Literature
 Introduction
In 1840, Sir Isaac Pitman, the English inventor of shorthand, was the first man to havethe idea of delivering instruction to a limitless audience via mail (Phillips, 1998). In 1946, theUniversity of South Africa was the only university to offer correspondence education courses.More than 20 years later another university, which has became the largest distance educationuniversity, the Open University in United Kingdom was found.In 1974 in Germany the Ferm University in Hager was the third university to offer distancecourses. Because of the success of these universities by the 1900s, the University of Chicagoestablished the first department of correspondence teaching (Matthews, 1999).Music is probably the last subject one would contemplate teaching online. Face-to-faceinstruction in music education has been the norm at all levels (Sherbon, 2005). Still, in the lastdecades, with the help of technological advantages, more and more universities, schools, andeducational institutes have introduced distance music education.Definition and Its MethodsDistance education comes in many forms and phrases such as “distance education,”“distance learning,” “e-learning,” and “online education” can be confusing. The definition of distance education encompasses teaching and learning, where learning occurs in a different placefrom teaching (Steiner, 1995). According to Clark and Verduin (1989), distance educationseparates the teacher and learner during a majority of each instructional process; uses educationalmedia to unite the teacher and learner and carry course content; and provides two-waycommunication between the teacher, tutor or educational agency, and learner. Distance educationcan include both synchronous (real-time) and asynchronous instruction (time delay). Examples
 
3of synchronous distance education methods include videoconferencing, Internet relay chats(IRC), and interactive TV. Examples of asynchronous distance education methods include self- paced courses taken via the Internet or CD-ROMs, emails, and online discussion groups.What it means in the world of education todayThe Internet has become a gateway for information, and as such, has allowed manyuniversities to offer distance music education courses and degrees. Moreover, more and moreteachers in elementary and in high school have introduced online music courses. For example, inSandpiper Elementary School in Broward Country, Florida, a music teacher called Ms. JoleneLong introduced an online course (Knee, Ariza, & Long, 2002). The significant of this idea wasthat this online course was introduced to elementary students because music instruction was previously limited to one half-hour weekly. Thus, the students did not have the opportunity for mastery of a musical instrument. Because more and more students expressed the desire to takehome instruments and have access to guided lessons, the web-based course was developed. Asolution to the above problem was the use of simple implements like a recorder and web-basedcourses (Knee, et al., 2002, p. 1). Something that was impossible a few years ago now is becoming a necessity.Furthermore, the first large scale project to create Internet-based courses at the pre-college level was the Virtual High School (VHS). It was a cooperative project that is funded in part by a technology challenge grants from the U.S. Department of Education, with technicalsupport from the Concord Consortium, a nonprofit group in Concord, MA. One of the instructorsin a high school, David Jost introduced his students to music theory (Shaw, 1999, p. 1). In thatvirtual class the unusual thing was that the students had never met each other. The instructor inspired interaction among students (Shaw, 1999, p. 1). An advantage was that distance

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->