Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Other Side of Rabindranath Tagore

The Other Side of Rabindranath Tagore

Ratings: (0)|Views: 483|Likes:
Rabindranath Tagore (7 May 1861 – 7 August 1941) is worshipped by many as God. He was awarded Noble Prize in 1913 for his contrbution to literature. Though he admired Islaam in many of his writings and was deeply influenced by great Isalaamic Scholars like Jalaluddin Rumi (R A ), Allama Zami ( R A) and Shaikh Sadi ( R A), he remained communal throughout his life. Apart from being communal, Tagore also was a profligate and a typical selfish Zamindar.
Rabindranath Tagore had always been portrayed larger than his life. Hardly people tried or dared to criticize him of his shortcomings. Those who tried to do so failed to propound sufficient supportive arguments. I have taken the trouble of crudely translating some excerpts I collected over the last few years. I wanted to share these with the readers. I am yet to read about Prof Humayun Azad's book 'Nari' where he exposed Rabindranath's anti-feminist views.

After I read a nice article written by one Muhammad Alamgir, I though about elaborating certain points with quotes from Hindu writers. Following is basically a compilation of excerpts taken from books and essays mostly written by Calcatian hindu writers who are basically Rabindra researchers. I hope some readers would be benefited by this.
Rabindranath Tagore (7 May 1861 – 7 August 1941) is worshipped by many as God. He was awarded Noble Prize in 1913 for his contrbution to literature. Though he admired Islaam in many of his writings and was deeply influenced by great Isalaamic Scholars like Jalaluddin Rumi (R A ), Allama Zami ( R A) and Shaikh Sadi ( R A), he remained communal throughout his life. Apart from being communal, Tagore also was a profligate and a typical selfish Zamindar.
Rabindranath Tagore had always been portrayed larger than his life. Hardly people tried or dared to criticize him of his shortcomings. Those who tried to do so failed to propound sufficient supportive arguments. I have taken the trouble of crudely translating some excerpts I collected over the last few years. I wanted to share these with the readers. I am yet to read about Prof Humayun Azad's book 'Nari' where he exposed Rabindranath's anti-feminist views.

After I read a nice article written by one Muhammad Alamgir, I though about elaborating certain points with quotes from Hindu writers. Following is basically a compilation of excerpts taken from books and essays mostly written by Calcatian hindu writers who are basically Rabindra researchers. I hope some readers would be benefited by this.

More info:

Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: Misbah ul Islam Andrabi on Sep 13, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOCX, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

12/22/2013

pdf

text

original

 
The Other Side:
Rabindranath Tagore
 By: Abu Arif Al Alawi
 
Rabindranath Tagore (7 May 1861
 –
7 August 1941) is worshipped by many as God. He wasawarded Noble Prize in 1913 for his contrbution to literature. Though he admired Islaam inmany of his writings and was deeply influenced by great Isalaamic Scholars like JalaluddinRumi (R A ), Allama Zami ( R A) and Shaikh Sadi ( R A), he remained communal throughouthis life. Apart from being communal, Tagore also was a profligate and a typical selfishZamindar.
 
INFLUENCE OF ISLAM ON TAGORE
 
There is no denying the fact that Rabindranath was deeply influenced by Islaam's universalmessage . Professor Ziauddin has written in his " Influence of Islaam on World Civilization"that diring his stay in Santiniketan at Bolpur in 1901, he witnessed Tagore's library enrichedwith Islaamic Literature including immortal writings by Rumi, Sadi , Zami and Hafiz.Rabindranath briefed Ziauddin that his father Devendranath Tagore recited verses of Quranin his death-bed (Influence of Islaam on World Civilization - page 96). Professor Ziauddinopines that Gitanjali is replete with Islaamic spiritualism and mysticism. For example, thevery first poem of Gitanjali is a perfect example in this respect:
 
Thou hast made me endless, such is thy pleasure. This frail vessel thou emptiest again andagain, and fillest it ever with fresh life.This little flute of a reed thou hast carried over hills and dales, and hast breathed through itmelodies eternally new.At the immortal touch of thy hands my little heart loses its limits in joy and gives birth toutterance ineffable.
 
Thy infinite gifts come to me only on these very small hands of mine. Ages pass, and still thoupourest, and still there is room to fill.When thou commandest me to sing it seems that my heart would break with pride; and I lookto thy face, and tears come to my eyes.All that is harsh and dissonant in my life melts into one sweet harmony--and my adorationspreads wings like a glad bird on its flight across the sea.I know thou takest pleasure in my singing. I know that only as a singer I come before thypresence.I touch by the edge of the far-spreading wing of my song thy feet which I could never aspireto reach.Drunk with the joy of singing I forget myself and call thee friend who art my lord.I know not how thou singest, my master! I ever listen in silent amazement."Klanti" the sixth poem in
Gitanjali is also an ideal example:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
,

,
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
এই 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
এ 
,
এই 
 
 
 
 
 
 
,
 
 
 
 

 
এই 
 
 
 
 
 
 
,

,

Activity (3)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
Dwarakanath Gowd liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->