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Following The Money Update

Following The Money Update

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Published by: JewishResearch on Sep 13, 2012
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INSTITUTE FOR JEWISH & COMMUNITY RESEARCH • WWW.JEWISHRESEARCH.ORG1
FOLLOWING THE MONEY:A LOOK AT JEWISH FOUNDATION GIVING
FOLLOWINGTHE MONEY:A LOOK AT JEWISHFOUNDATION GIVINGERIK LUDWIGARYEH WEINBERG
FOLLOWING THE MONEY:A LOOK AT JEWISH FOUNDATION GIVING
MAJOR FINDINGS
• Nearly one quarter (24%) of total dollarsdonated by Jewish foundations, or $335million, went to Jewish causes, showinga small (3%) increase from the previousIJCR study.• Thirty-six percent ($119 million)of total dollars donated by Jewishfoundations to Jewish causes wentto Israel related organizations.• The average grant to Israel relatedorganizations was over 60% larger thanthose to other Jewish organizations.• Jewish foundations are committed tocentralized funding in America andIsrael.• Israel advocacy, including trips to Israel,accounted for 24% of all dollars toIsrael.• The percent of Jewish foundation dollarsdonated to Israel related organizationshas increased from 32% to 36% sincethe previous IJCR study.
INSTITUTE FOR JEWISH &COMMUNITY RESEARCH
The Institute for Jewish & CommunityResearch is an independent, non-partisanthink tank that provides innovativeresearch and pragmatic policy analysis ona broad range of issues including philan-thropy, racial and religious identity, andanti-Semitism.
INTRODUCTION
Following the Money: A Look at JewishFoundation Giving
presents selectedfindings from the forthcoming
Study of  Jewish Foundation
s. The study by theInstitute for Jewish & CommunityResearch (IJCR) provides insight intoJewish foundation philanthropy and itsimpact on Jewish and non-Jewishcharitable organizations. This researchnote focuses on Jewish foundation givingto Jewish causes in America and abroad.Jewish foundations are making their markon the Jewish philanthropic world. Theyhelp to fund the vast network of Jewishcommunal institutions, while also actingas catalysts for innovative programmingand upstart organizations meeting thediverse needs of the Jewish community.The increasing role of foundations is notuniquely a Jewish trend. From 1999 to2009 the number of grantmakingfoundations in America has increased intotal number from 50,201 to 76,545, anincrease of over 50%.
1
Nearly 10,000foundations have made grants to Jewishcauses and of the 100 largest privatefoundations, 16 were founded by a Jewishdonor.The Institute for Jewish & CommunityResearch has provided in-depth analysis of 
Erik Ludwig
Chief Operating Officer 
Aryeh Weinberg
Research Director © 2012 All rights reserved. Institute for Jewish & Community Research.
 
INSTITUTE FOR JEWISH & COMMUNITY RESEARCH • WWW.JEWISHRESEARCH.ORG2
FOLLOWING THE MONEY:A LOOK AT JEWISH FOUNDATION GIVING
trends, values and beliefs in philanthropy over thelast fifteen years. Our goal is to provide accurateand understandable data on Jewish giving. We arenot advocating that foundations give in a specificmanner—more Jewishly or less Jewishly—or forwhat purposes foundations should give. Byproviding data and analysis that offer a deeperunderstanding of Jewish giving in America, ourintent is to encourage dialogue betweenfoundations, community leaders, and Jewishorganizations.
METHODOLOGY
Following the Money: A Look at Jewish FoundationGiving
includes 56 foundations with combinedassets of just under $20 billion that made grantstotalling $1.4 billion according to the most recentyear available in IRS 990 filings, either 2009 or2010. Total giving represented 7% of total assets,an amount above the 5% minimum required bythe IRS.“Jewish foundations” are defined as foundationsestablished by a Jewish donor. While the majorityof foundations’ mission statements claim a Jewishinterest, this is not a requirement, though allfoundations selected have made grants to Jewishcauses. The selected Jewish foundations includeprivate foundations and supporting foundationsunder the roof of Jewish Federations. Foundationswere selected for study based on a number of cri-teria, including prominence in the Jewish commu-nity and in American society as a whole, regionaldiversity, size, age and organizational style. Thesample provides a valuable look at a broad rangeof Jewish foundations. The study reflects “founda-tion giving” and does not comprehensively cap-ture the giving of living donors who have access toa multitude of philanthropic mechanisms outsideof their foundations.Jewish recipient institutions were defined as anycharitable organizations that serve the Jewishcommunity directly or serve the general commu-nity with an explicitly Jewish mission. All grantsmade to organizations in Israel are consideredJewish. Grants to Israel related organizations areat times in this report evaluated separately fromother Jewish giving, but together comprise“Jewish giving” as a whole.Please see list of foundations atwww.JewishResearch.org. Any discrepancies incharts are due to rounding errors.
 
INSTITUTE FOR JEWISH & COMMUNITY RESEARCH • WWW.JEWISHRESEARCH.ORG3
FOLLOWING THE MONEY:A LOOK AT JEWISH FOUNDATION GIVING
GIVING TO JEWISH CAUSES
Private foundations established by Jews hold vastsums of wealth. The foundations selected for thisstudy have approximately $20 billion in combinedassets. An important question facing the Jewishcommunity, especially as centralized fundraising inthe Jewish community decreases and the numberof private foundations increases, is: “To whatextent should private foundations be relied on tosupport Jewish causes?” The data revealed that24% ($335 million) of the total $1.4 billion dollarsdonated went to Jewish causes, with the remain-ing 76% ($1.05 billion) going to non-Jewish causes.(Figure 1) The distribution of total grants mirroredtotal dollars, with 24% of all grants going to Jewishcauses, and 76% to non-Jewish causes.The percent of dollars that went to Jewish causes(24%) represents a small increase over findingsfrom the previous IJCR study of Jewish foundationgiving.
2
However, the percent of grants remainedconstant at 24% (2,177) out of a total 9,232, indi-cating an increase in the average size of grants toJewish causes. The average size of a gift to Jewishcauses, excluding Israel related organizations, was$134,000.How much should the Jewish community expectfrom private Jewish foundations? As Jewishorganizations seek to increase philanthropicsupport from Jewish foundations, it is importantto remember that Jewish foundations havehistorically given to general American causes atexceptional rates, and will likely continue to do so.As a community, American Jewry expresses valuesand ethics that are simultaneously Jewish andAmerican. Jewish foundations are no different.Jewish foundations are committed to the Jewishphilanthropic network as well as the vastAmerican independent sector. Many of thesedonors believe their philanthropy to health,education, social justice and human servicesreflect core tenets of Jewish life even when theserecipient organizations may not be Jewish.

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