Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Cariou vs. Prince: The Copyright Bungle, by Joy Garnett, Artnet, 2011

Cariou vs. Prince: The Copyright Bungle, by Joy Garnett, Artnet, 2011

Ratings: (0)|Views: 2|Likes:
Published by Joy Garnett
Will courts, judges and photographers ever understand the difference between a mass-produced photograph and a unique art object? Artnet Magazine (March 31, 2011)
Will courts, judges and photographers ever understand the difference between a mass-produced photograph and a unique art object? Artnet Magazine (March 31, 2011)

More info:

Categories:Topics, Art & Design
Published by: Joy Garnett on Sep 18, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/18/2013

pdf

text

original

 
March 31 2011
 A photo by Patrick Cariou at left, and its adaptation by Richard Prince at right
Cariou vs. Prince: THE COPYRIGHT BUNGLE
by Joy Garnett
Will courts, judges and photographers ever understand the difference between a mass- produced photograph and a unique art object?
 As is well-known, the artist
Richard Prince
has lost his copyright infringement suit to thephotographer 
Patrick Cariou
[see Artnet News, March 21, 2011]. The decision is nowpending anappeal. The news has prompted heated commentary by almost everyone,includingcopyright maximalists,photographers, collage artists,painters who use appropriated imagery,New York dealersand“open source” mavens. IP lawyers have writtenboilerplate statements, typically devoid of any nuance or even the most basicunderstanding of the visual arts. Artists and photographers who either bear Prince apersonal grudge, or else find his and others’ methods of appropriation suspect, havetrotted out the usual platitudes: "lazy" "thief" "millionaire." In fact, one would think fromreading the comments sections of art blogs that Prince’s great crime was in beingsuccessful, and that copyright is a convenient tool for redistributing some of his wealth.But copyright law is not about generating or artificially leveraging artists’ income. It iscertainly not about redistributing deserved or undeserved wealth.Copyrightis aboutregulatingmass production. Its roots are in late 17th- and early 18th-century publishingand the globalization of theprinting press(cf:Statute of Anne, ca. 1709). Long before

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->