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F is for Fat: How Obesity Threatens America's Future

F is for Fat: How Obesity Threatens America's Future

Ratings: (0)|Views: 32,334 |Likes:
Published by Daniel J. Schneider
This new analysis provides a picture of two possible
futures for the health of Americans over
the next 20 years.
This new analysis provides a picture of two possible
futures for the health of Americans over
the next 20 years.

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Published by: Daniel J. Schneider on Sep 18, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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07/10/2013

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September 2012
P
reventing
e
Pidemics
.P
rotecting
P
eoPle
.
Issue RepoRt
2012
F as in Fat:
How obesIty tHReatens ameRIcas FutuRe
embaRGoeD untIL tuesDay, septembeR 18, 2012 at 10 am
 
tFaH boaRD oF DIRectoRs
Gail Christopher, DN
President o the Board, TFAH Vice President—Program Strategy 
 WK Kellogg Foundation
Cynthia M. Harris, PhD, DABT
Vice President o the Board, TFAH  Director and Proessor 
Institute o Public Health, Florida A&MUniversity 
Theodore Spencer
Secretary o the Board, TFAH Senior Advocate, Climate Center.
Natural Resources Deense Council
Robert T. Harris, MD
Treasurer o the Board, TFAH  Former Chie Medical Ofcer and Senior Vice President or Healthcare 
BlueCross BlueShield o North Carolina
David Fleming, MD
 Director o Public Health 
Seattle King County, Washington
 Arthur Garson, Jr., MD, MPH
 Director, Center or Health Policy, University Proessor,And Proessor o Public Health Services 
University o Virginia
 John Gates, JD
 Founder, Operator and Manager 
Nashoba Brook Bakery 
 Alonzo Plough, MA, MPH, PhD
 Director, Emergency Preparedness and Response Program 
Los Angeles County Department o Public Health
Eduardo Sanchez, MD, MPH
Chie Medical Ofcer 
Blue Cross Blue Shield o Texas
 Jane Silver, MPH
President 
Irene Diamond Fund
RepoRt autHoRs
 Jerey Levi, PhD.
 Executive Director 
Trust or America’s Health and
Associate Proessor in the Department o Health Policy 
The George Washington University School o Public Health and Health Services
Laura M. Segal, MA 
 Director o Public Aairs 
Trust or America’s Health
Rebecca St. Laurent, JD
Health Policy Research Manager 
Trust or America’s Health
 Albert Lang 
Communications Manager 
Trust or America’s Health
 Jack Rayburn
Government Relations Representative 
Trust or America’s Health
contRIbutoRs
Kathryn Thomas, MJ
Senior Communications Ofcer 
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Laura C. Leviton, PhD.
Special Advisor or Evaluation 
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Tina J. Kauh, PhD.
Research and Evaluation Program Ofcer 
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Chuck Alexander, MA 
Senior Vice President, and Director, Public Health Team 
Burness Communications
Elizabeth Wenk, MA 
Vice President 
Burness Communications
Elizabeth Goodman, MS
Senior Associate 
Burness Communications
 Adam Zimmerman
Associate 
Burness Communications
peeR ReVIeweRs
Scott Kahn, MD, MPH
Co-Director 
George Washington University Weight Management Center;
and Faculty 
Department o Health Policy o theGeorge Washington University School o Public Health and Health Services
Monica Vinluan, JD
Project Director, Healthier Communities Initiatives 
The Y 
 acKnowLeDGements
t
rust
 
for 
mericA 
s
H
eAltH
 
is
 
 a 
 
non
-
profit
,
non
-
partisan
 
organization
 
dedicated
 
to
 
saving
 
lives
 
by 
 
protecting
 
the
 
health
 
of
 
every 
 
community 
 
 and
 
 working
 
to
 
make
 
disease
 
prevention
 
 a 
 
national
 
priority 
.
 
3
Introduction
The following is a letter from Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, MBA, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Jeff Levi, PhD, executive director of Trust for America’s Health.
T
he uture health o the United States is at a crossroads, due in large part tothe obesity epidemic. Each year, the Trust or America’s Health (TFAH)and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) issue
 F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America’s Future 
to examine strategies or addressing the obesity crisis. Inthis ninth edition o the report, TFAH and RWJF also commissioned a new study tolook at how obesity could impact the uture health and wealth o our nation.
This new analysis provides a picture o two pos-sible utures or the health o Americans overthe next 20 years:
n
I obesity rates continue on their current tra- jectory, it’s estimated that:
s
Obesity rates or adults could reach or ex-ceed 44 percent in every state and exceed60 percent in 13 states;
s
The number o new cases o type 2 diabe-tes, coronary heart disease and stroke, hy-pertension and arthritis could increase 10times between 2010 and 2020 — and thendouble again by 2030; and
s
Obesity-related health care costs could in-crease by more than 10 percent in 43 statesand by more than 20 percent in nine states.
n
But, i we could lower obesity trends by reduc-ing body mass indices (BMIs) by only 5 per-cent in each state, we could spare millions o  Americans rom serious health problems andsave billions o dollars in health spending —between 6.5 percent and 7.8 percent in costsin almost every state.
1
  As this year’s report details, we have seen impor-tant inroads made toward preventing and reduc-ing obesity around the country, especially amongchildren. We know that real changes are possible.But we also have ound that eorts will need tobe intensied i we are going to achieve a majorreduction in obesity and related health problems.The promising results we see in some cities andstates pave the way or more intensive eorts.Multiple studies and reports have demonstratedthat the cities and states that took an early andcomprehensive approach to preventing obesity have demonstrated progress toward reversingthe epidemic. For instance, in Caliornia, over-all rates o overweight and obesity among th-,seventh- and ninth-graders decreased by 1.1 per-cent rom 2005 to 2010, and, in New York City,obesity in grades K-8 decreased 5.5 percent rom2006-07 to 2010-11.
2, 3
In Mississippi, combinedrates o overweight and obesity among all pub-lic elementary school students dropped rom 43percent in 2005 to 37.3 percent in 2011.
4
  While these cases showed that pockets o prog-ress are possible, they also showed that chil-dren who ace the biggest obstacles to healthy choices and are at greatest risk or obesity, suchas children in lower-income amilies and Blackand Hispanic children, did not share equally inprogress. That’s why a study released just thismonth tells the best story o all.New data rom Philadelphia show the city re-duced obesity rates in ways that also helped toclose the disparities gap. In addition to achiev-ing an overall decline in obesity rates amongpublic school students (rom 21.5 percent o allpublic school students in the 2006-2007 school year to 20.5 percent in the 2009-2010 school year), the city made the largest improvementsamong Black male and Hispanic emale stu-dents. For Black male students, rates declinedrom 20.66 percent to 19.08 percent, and ratesor Hispanic emale students declined rom22.26 percent to 20.61 percent within the sametimerame. We need to learn rom the City o Brotherly Love and spread the actions and poli-cies that work so all children can enjoy the ben-ets o better health.These pockets o progress around the country are showing the positive impact that many poli-cies and programs are having — but they needto be taken to scale. Fortunately, we know a lot about what it will take to bend the obesity curvein America.

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