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Free Press 9-21-12

Free Press 9-21-12

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01/19/2013

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WWW.CHAMPIONNEWSPAPER.COM • FRIDAY,
SEPT. 21
, 2012 • VOL. 15, NO. 26 FREE
REE 
RESS 
• A PUBLICATION OF ACE III COMMUNICATIONS •
 by Kathy Mitchellkathy@dekalbchamp.com
F
rom a pre-Civil War farming communi-ty to one of America’s many busy smalltowns growing up beside the nation’srailroad lines, Doraville has reinventeditself many times during the past 200 years. Ithas seen a giant automobile manufacturing fa-cility come and go, had the Olympic torch passthrough its streets and made business history as
the site of Georgia’s rst McDonald’s. It was
the home of former astronaut
John Casper
andthe training site of former heavyweight boxingchampion
Evander Holyfield
.These stories and many more are told inthe newly released book on Doraville that is part of Arcadia Publishing’s
 Images of America
 series. Written by local resident
Bob Kelley
,
 Doraville—Images
of 
 America
explores theevents large and small that have made Doravillethe city it is today. Even those who are not espe-cially interested in Doraville are likely to enjoythis portrait of small town America through the19th, 20th and into the 21st century.“I had often seen the
 Images of America
  books at a local Barnes & Noble but never dreamed I would one day author one,” Kelleyrecalled. “Doraville Library Director 
TammyHenry
approached me about an email she hadreceived from Arcadia Publishing seeking some-one to edit such a book and I thought, ‘I coulddo that!’ so I responded to Arcadia and startedthe ball rolling. I thought it would be something
the citizens of Doraville would nd interesting
and that would boost local civic pride.”Kelley calls himself a
 
history buff and saidhe has enjoyed reading history from his child-hood, adding, “At 61, I have experienced a lotof our generation’s most famous history from
Kennedy
’s assassination to landing a man onthe moon to the advent of cell phones and high-end computers.”A native of Claremore, Okla., who movedto Georgia more than 30 years ago, Kelley saidhe didn’t know much about Doraville until hemoved there 10 years ago. “Of course I knewabout the GM plant and that there were a lot of good ethnic restaurants there, but that was aboutit,” he said.Kelley said that once he decided to take onthe project, the
 
major hurdle was getting buy-infrom local residents. “People were reluctant to
Local writer helps Doraville tell its story
Above, writer Bob Kelley holds copies of his new book onDoraville’s history. Below, two images of the city’s past includea 1955 beauty pageant and the training site of former heavy-weight boxing champion Evander Holyfield. Kelley photo by EdSt. Amour, others provided
 
www.facebook.com/ championnewspaper
 
www.championnewspaper.com
 
www.twitter.com/ championnews
 
Follow us.
Serving East Atlanta, Avondale Estates, Brookhaven, Chamblee, Clarkston, Decatur, Doraville, Dunwoody, Lithonia, Pine Lake, Tucker and Stone Mountain.
Ousted Georgia Perimeterpresident discusses legacy
Former Georgia Perimeter College Presi-dent Anthony Tricoli recounts his time atthe institution.
This article is the first in a series looking into the riseand fall of former Georgia Perimeter College presi-dent Anthony Tricoli.
  by Andrew Cauthenandrew@dekalbchamp.com
I
n 2006, Georgia Perimeter College (GPC) boast-ed 20,000 students, 389 faculty and six campuses.That was before
Anthony
 
Tricoli
became president of the institution, founded in 1958.When the 33-year veteran of higher educationwas dismissed in May, the state’s largest two-year college had a roster of 27,000 students, more than500 faculty members and one fewer campus.
The college also had a $16 million decit.
“It’s a wonderful institution,” said Tricoli duringan interview with
The Champion
late August. “It’sone of the best two-year colleges in the country.“I enjoyed every minute of the work…until thelast month. I enjoyed all except the last two weeks.”
The last two weeks
The demise of Tricoli’s GPC tenure started withan April 30 email from
Steve Wrigley
to
Henry
 
See Tricoli on Page 13ASee Doraville on Page 13A
 
The Champion Free Press, Friday, Sept. 21, 2012 Page 2A
Local News
Grandmother arrested for allegedlybeating 3-year-old to death
Brick dedications at three librarybranches leave lasting legacy
 
Proposed Substantial Amendment to the 2008-2012Consolidated Plan, including the 2008 Annual Action PlanFor 
 
the Neighborhood Stabilization Program 1
The DeKalb County Human and Community Development Department is proposing asubstantial amendment to the 2008-2012 Consolidated Plan, including the 2008 Annual Action Plan. This substantial amendment will amend the budget of NeighborhoodStabilization Program 1 (NSP1) Application submitted to HUD in 2008. In accordancewith the Housing and Economic Recovery Act 2008, the Department of Housing andUrban Development has allocated $18,545,013 in emergency funding for assistancewith the redevelopment of abandoned and foreclosed properties.The purpose of this amendment is to revise the budget to show the planned use of additional program income and any subsequent changes that may be necessary on theuse of NSP1 funds. The budget categories include acquisition, rehabilitation anddisposition of foreclosed homes; establishment of land banks; demolition of blightedstructures; redevelopment of vacant properties; and, complying with all NeighborhoodStabilization Program 1 (NSP-1) requirements. All citizens are invited to review the Proposed Substantial Amendment to the 2008-2012Consolidated Plan, including the 2008 Annual Action Plan for the NeighborhoodStabilization Program 1 from
September 13, 2012 – September 28, 2012
on theDeKalb County website, http://www.co.dekalb.ga.us/commdev/publicNotices.html, andat the location identified below.
DeKalb County Human and Community Development Department150 East Ponce de Leon Avenue, Suite 330, Decatur, Georgia 30030Monday - Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Comment forms may be obtained and completed at the above listed location. Commentsmay also be faxed or emailed to the Human and Community Development Department
.
Fax: (404) 286-3337Email: amitchell@dekalbcountyga.gov
 
Help complete your child’s future by encouraging them to geta college degree. Call the Hispanic Scholarship Fund today at
 
1-877-HSF-INFO or visit
 YourWordsToday.org 
 to learn more.
Their tomorrow depends on your words today.
My child is goingto college at
.
At brick dedicationson Aug. 25, families andother community members
saw for the rst time their 
engraved bricks that were placed at three DeKalbCounty Public Library(DCPL) branches: HairstonCrossing, Salem-Panola andTucker-Reid H. Cofer Li- brary.Seventy-nine commemo-rative bricks were installedfor the dedications withengraved messages such as“READ and QUERY AllYour Lives,” “READINGCHANGES LIVES,” “avidreader and teacher,” and“DCPL Staff is the Best.”Donations for the bricksraised nearly $8,000 for theDeKalb Library Foundation
to benet the library system.
Those who had bricksinstalled at the Tucker-ReidH. Cofer Library includedDistrict 6 Commissioner 
Kathie
 
Gannon
, LibraryDirector 
Alison
 
Weissinger
,DeKalb Library FoundationTreasurer 
Bill
 
Harshman
 and Friends Alliance Presi-dent
Janis
 
Jones
.
Pauline
 
Sawadogo
 remembered her mother 
Iwaoga
 
F. Nikiema
, whonever had the chance tolearn to read, with an en-graved brick. Sawadogo andher family moved to the areafrom West Africa three yearsago and they regularly usethe Tucker-Reid H. Cofer  branch. At the library, sheuses GED test preparationmaterials, her sixth gradeson chooses reading ma-terials and her husband,who teaches English, can
nd adult learning materi
-als.Bricks also commemo-rate business and civicgroups. Among them areMainstreet Tucker Alli-ance founder 
Charlton
 
Allen
,
Tucker Times
,Leadership DeKalb,
TheChampion
newspaper and
 CrossRoads News
. Sev-eral book clubs honoredmembers with a brick,including Tucker Mon-day Book Club member 
Nancy
 
Krawitz
.CD Moody Construc-tion Company, which built both the HairstonCrossing and Salem-Panola Library branches,generously donated theentire brick installation atthe Salem-Panola Libraryas well as several engraved bricks. Congressman
Hank 
 
Johnson
spoke at the Sa-lem-Panola Library dedica-tion and honored his mother,a former teacher, with anengraved brick.Bricks also are availableat the new Stonecrest Li- brary until Nov. 1. For moreinformation, call (404) 370-8450, ext. 2238 or emailfoundation@dekalblibrary.org.
 by Daniel Beauregarddaniel@dekalbchamp.com
Selena Rivera
, 42, wasarrested and held without bond Sept. 10 for alleg-edly beating her 3-year-oldgranddaughter to death witha pipe.Police responded Aug.21 to a call at Rivera’sresidence at 4532 Golf VistaCircle in Decatur referenc-ing a “3-year-old female,unconscious and not breath-ing.”According to a policereport, Rivera told policethat she was in bed with thevictim reading the Biblewhen she noticed the vic-tim’s hand turning blue, eyesglossy and rolling back intoher head and white foamcoming from her nose. Thevictim was transported toEgleston Children’s Hospitalin Atlanta where she waslater pronounced dead.Rivera told the policethat on Aug. 8, the victimhad a seizure in the show-er and had slipped and hither forehead and had to goto the hospital. However,
medical ofcials ruled the
death a homicide and anarrest warrant states thevictim’s 8-year-old sister later told police Riverawas “beating the victimwith a silver pipe on theday she died and shovedthe victim in a closet.”The arrest warrantalso states that during the
victim’s autopsy ofcials
found extensive bluntforce trauma from her head to her calves.
NOTICE
 
OF
 
PUBLIC
 
HEARING
 
The
 
Mayor
 
and
 
City
 
Council
 
of 
 
the
 
City
 
of 
 
Chamblee,
 
Georgia
 
will
 
hold
 
a
 
public
 
hearing
 
on
 
Thursday,
 
October
 
11,
 
2012
 
at
 
the
 
Chamblee
 
Civic
 
Center,
 
3540
 
Broad
 
Street,
 
Chamblee,
 
GA
 
30341
 
at
 
6:00
 
p.m.
 
to
 
receive
 
public
 
comments
 
regarding
 
the
 
following
 
zoning
 
matters:
 
1)
 
A
 
variance
 
to
 
Appendix
 
A,
 
Zoning
 
Ordinance,
 
Section
 
907.A.4.c.,
 
Storefront
 
Requirements.
 
The
 
subject
 
property
 
is
 
5130
 
Peachtree
 
Boulevard.
 
The
 
applicant
 
requests
 
window
 
heights
 
begin
 
at
 
7
 
feet.
 
 
Page 3A The Champion Free Press, Friday, Sept. 21, 2012
Atkinson
Accrediting agencyto investigateDeKalb schools
 by Daniel Beauregarddaniel@dekalbchamp.comSchool accrediting agen-cy AdvancED will inves-tigate the DeKalb CountySchool District (DCSD) af-ter concerns thatthe school dis-trict may not bemeeting severalaccreditationstandards.In the Aug.28 letter toSchool Superin-tendent
CherylAtkinson
fromAdvancED,the accreditingagency stated ithas received numerous com- plaints about the manage-ment of the school district.“It was from a broad base of the community— from parents, taxpayers and
staff, to public ofcials,”
said
Mark Elgart
, presidentof AdvancED. “We’ve seena continued pattern of con-cern.”AdvancED’s letter asksthe district to answer al-legations that the DeKalbCounty school board hasmanaged the district’s bud-
get over the past ve years.
The letter also lists other concerns such as undue
inuence by the board in
the hiring of personnel, in-terference with budgeting procedures and accounting,
releasing condential infor 
-mation leaked from execu-tive sessions and undermin-ing the authority of schooladministrators and supervi-sors throughout the system.“The district acknowl-edges challenges from the past and is committed tocontinuing to address andcomply with all AdvancED/SACS standards,” Atkinsonstates in the letter. “Progressis ongoing and we have notstopped working on anyconcerns. Some issues takelonger than others to re-solve.”However, since it has re-ceived Atkinson’s response,AdvancED has decided toappoint a special reviewteam to perform an on-siteinvestigation Oct. 17-19.Since her hiring less thana year ago, Atkinson saidshe has listened to thoseconcerns from board members, thecommunity, stu-dents and staff andresponded to them by implementinga number of initia-tives, which arelisted in the letter.AdvancED ac-knowledged theinitiatives Atkinsonhad started butsaid in a statement,“The concerns described inthe letter of correspondence
to you could have signi
-cant…negative impact onthe capacity of the schoolsystem to realize the manyimprovements that are thefocus of these initiatives.”Changes listed in theletter include initiating a fo-rensic audit of the district’s
nancial records, imple
-menting a zero-based bud-geting process, restructuring
the central ofce, develop
-ing an E-Book technology program, and implementinga new curriculum with quar-terly assessments.Currently, DCSD has an“on advisement” status withAdvancED, which meansthe accreditation agencyhas given the district a listof concerns to address. El-gart said since the last Ad-vancED assessment, the dis-trict hasn’t made adequate progress on addressingthose concerns.According to the state-ment from the accreditingagency, the purpose of theinvestigation is to “affordall parties the opportunityto provide information andevidence related to thestated concerns so that aninformed decision can bemade as to the validity andextent of alleged violationsrelating to the Standards of Accreditation.”
News Briefs
Teenager shot to deathnear Lithonia Sept. 11
A man whom police sayshot to death a teenager near Lithonia Sept. 11 was ar-rested three days later.“Investigators from the
DeKalb Sheriff’s Ofce
Fugitive Squad corneredand arrested 18-year-old
Haenok Temesgen Tesfaye
[Sept. 14] around 10 p.m. atMemorial Drive and I-285,”according to a media releasefrom Sgt.
Adrion Bell,
aspokesman for the DeKalb
Sheriff’s Ofce.
Tesfaye is being chargedfor the murder of 16-year-old
 Frederick English.
According to
Me-kka
 
Parish
, DeKalb Policespokeswoman, police of-
cers were called to 5922
Heritage Walk at 7:40 p.m.Sept. 11 in reference to ashooting.English and two other  people were walking alongHeritage Walk when a black car approached, according todetectives.An occupant of the car 
got out and red multiple
shots at the group, strikingEnglish, who ran a short dis-tance to another street andthen collapsed in the frontyard of a home, according todetectives.Someone at that homedrove the English, who had been struck in the face, to
the hospital before ofcers
arrived. English later died atthe hospital.According to the warrant,English had been involved inan earlier confrontation withTesfaye.A separate warrantagainst Tesfaye also accuseshim of armed robbery onSept. 4. Tesfaye is accusedof pulling a handgun on aman and taking an AppleiPod and $280.Tesfaye was arrestedwithout incident and is beingheld in the DeKalb CountyJail.
Inmate dies en route toDeKalb County jail
An inmate died Sept. 13on the way to the DeKalbCounty jail, according to
DeKalb Sheriff’s Ofce
spokesman
Adrion
 
Bell
.The male inmate, whosename has not been released,was arrested in Fulton Coun-ty for violating his probation.He was being transported
 by DeKalb Sheriff’s Ofce
deputies who stopped at theSouth Fulton Municipal Re-gional Jail in Union City to pick up several inmates.The man collapsed out-side the Union City facilityat approximately 2:20 a.m.on the way to the men’sroom. Union City police andemergency medical techni-cians tried to revive theinmate who was transportedto South Fulton RegionalHospital where he was pro-nounced dead at 3:35 a.m.The cause of death is notyet known.
Permit program mayreduce home construction 
A new DeKalb County pilot program is designed toexpedite the permitting pro-cess for partially constructedhomes abandoned as a resultof bankruptcies in the build-ing industry.The program, which runsthrough Dec. 28, allows for a builder who proposes tocomplete construction of  previously permitted, butincomplete, homes on whichwork has been suspended for more than 90 days to applyfor a new building permit for the structure.Many partially con-structed homes have been bought recently “as is” byhomebuilders who wish tocomplete the construction,
receive a Certicate of Oc
-cupancy (CO) and placethem on the market.Currently, a residential building permit fee of $1,500 – $2,000 is assessed for the completion of partiallyconstructed homes where previously issued building permits have expired or thescope of necessary work tocomplete the homes is un-clear. The “Building Permitfor a Previously PermittedResidential Structure” pro-vides for special building permit procedures and feestailored to the condition of each home and sets the feesat amounts proportionate tothe work needed to completeeach home.If upon initial inspec-tion it is determined that theexisting structure is so in-complete or deteriorated thatit would fail an initial struc-tural inspection, the builder would then be required tosubmit for a full building permit for a new residentialstructure, starting with aninitial structural inspection.For more information,call
David
 
Moss
, senior in-spector, at (770) 572-4830.
DeKalb County to hold jobfair Sept. 21
The DeKalb CountyWorkforce DevelopmentDepartment will hold its sev-enth annual Workforce De-velopment Day job fair Sept.21, 10 a.m.–2 p.m. at theMaloof Auditorium, 1300Commerce Drive, Decatur.The event offers job seek-ers the opportunity to meetwith representatives fromvarious departments andcompanies, including OneDeKalb Works contractorsand private sector employ-ers.Recruiting companiesincluding Comcast, Sears,TJ Maxx, All (n)1 Security,Walmart, Life House Part-ners, Inc., Manpower, andDeKalb County’s publicsafety department have re- ported new hires in the areaof communication techni-cians, forklift operators, po-
lice ofcers, E911 dispatch
-ers, security guards, salesassociates, cashiers, market-ing coordinators and facilitydirectors with salaries rang-ing from $16,000 to $85,000 per year.The upcoming job fair will give job seekers the op- portunity to meet with indus-try professionals who willcritique resumes, provideinterviewing and networkingtips, and explain why per-sonal branding and market-
ing is benecial to their job
search.Job seekers also willhave the opportunity to visitthe county’s mobile career unit to apply for positions,construct a resume and meetwith a workforce profes-sional.Jobseekers interested in participating in the job fair should register online athttp://conta.cc/NEPg1q.For more information,contact
Brent
 
Sharperson
, business relations special-ist, at (404) 687-2771 or  bwsharperson@dekalbcoun-tyga.gov.

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