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World's Fair: Remarks by Robert Moses

World's Fair: Remarks by Robert Moses

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Published by JohnWilliams86
World Fair New York 1964
World's Fair: Remarks by Robert Moses
World Fair New York 1964
World's Fair: Remarks by Robert Moses

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Published by: JohnWilliams86 on Sep 24, 2012
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11/12/2013

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Box# 32Folder# 627Word's Fair: Remarksby Robert Moses
1961-
1963
 
REMARKS
OF
ROBERT
MOSES
UPON RECEIVING
A
PUBLIC
AFFAIRS
AWARD
FROM THE
BRONX
BOARD
OF
TRADE
AT
THE
ANNUAL
DINNER
CONCOURSE
PLAZA
HOTEL,
NEW
YORK
THURSDAY
EVENING, APRIL
20,
1961
Mr.
Goldman, Ladies and
GenUemen:
Thank you for your award which I value hiqhly because, whether·deserved
or
not,
it
expresses the opinion
of
those
who
lmow
what has been
going
on in
the field
of
physical improvements here
in
the Bronx and maybe presumed
to
have some judgment about their contemporariesa
You
are
generous
to
overlook, ignore, gloss over or forget
the
occasional differences and irritations which seem
to
me
to
be
inescapable
ff
we
are
to make progress
in
a democracy. Others, to
be
sure,
regard
the tempests
and
rhubarbs
of
the
day
as
avoidable
by
those skilled
in
theChesterfieldian
or
Machiavelian schools
of
diplomacy, statescraft andparlor society.
Let
me, as the boys
in
the tavern say, take a plea. A friend toldme the other day about a poker game years ago
at
Canoe
Place
Inn
attended
by
Governor Smith and his cronies. After I had left, one
of
the playersmade a caustic
remark
about me
which
the Governor pointedly ignored.Judge James
A.
Foley, however, turned
to
the critic and said, "Leave thatfellow alone. He's a porcupine."There
is
no
place between the canape's and the
dessert
for adisquisition on the old, the present
and
the future Bronx.
My
task and that
 
'!"
.,
-2-
of
my
loyal associates has been to save,
restore,
enhance and make easilyaccessible its natural attractions. This
task
has been
in
part
miraculouslyaided
by
forqotten conservatives
of
the past and
in
part made appallinglydifficult by three-quarters
of
a century of ruthless, senseless
explo~ta.tion
since rapid transit began.
Much
has
been accomplished
in
the
last
thirty
or
forty
years
to reclaim this magnificent gateway
to
the metropolis.
Much
must stUl be
done
at
this late date
when
the obstacles
have
multiplied andthe courage
to
face them seems
at
times non-existent.Here
is
a startling example
of
the appalling cost of delay
in
public works
if
you
wait until the last critic has subsided. The price of
one
mile of the Cross-Bronx Expressway -a half mile
on
each side
of the
Grand Boulevard
and
Concourse -includinq land,
is
twenty-eight milliondollars. With the federal qovernment payinq ninety per cent,
you
can imaginethe reaction
of
members
of
Congress from
states
where they build a hundredmiles
of
qood road within this fiqure,
We
can still pick
up
the
remaininq attractive
open
spaces underthe terms of
the
State
Park
Bond
Proposition adopted
last
Fall.
Sewaqe
,pollution along your matchless East River water front
is
an
increasinqmenace and every
plan
to face it has been knocked
down
by
shortsightedpolitics, callous
public
indifference and lack
of
leadership.
Of
course
it's
a
touqh
job.
If
this were not so,
it
would
have been finished long aqo.
Just
a
word
about housing. The Bronx
will
not
be
rebullt
to
house
middle income cooperative tenants, the only
hope
of
large scale slum

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